All posts by Sarah F. Sharpe

CFP: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2019:
The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Friday, February 22 – Sunday, February 24, 2019

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Keynote Panelists:
Logan Kistler, Smithsonian Institution
Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith, University of Otago
Christina Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma

Abstract Deadline: October 15, 2018

 

Ancient DNA has revolutionized archaeology and our understanding of human prehistory. Its insights have revealed hominins unknown from the fossil record, clarified global human migrations, and transformed how we understand plant and animal domestication processes. Despite these discoveries, many questions remain about how to interpret ancient DNA results and how to study the relationships between genes and culture:

  • How can we ensure that genetic results are interpreted within appropriate archaeological and anthropological frameworks?
  • How can we incorporate innovative paleogenetic methods into archaeological fieldwork and research design?
  • What are the ethical considerations of working with samples from archaeological contexts?

As laboratory and analytical methods continue to improve, the ancient DNA revolution is poised to expand even further within archaeology. At this time of innovation and possibility it is critical to assess the current trajectory and future of the discipline: the State of the Field.

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a conference titled State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology on February 22-24, 2019. Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological research. This year’s conference aims to address the many issues surrounding the development and uses of ancient DNA methods around the world and to promote discussion between archaeologists, anthropologists, and geneticists in order to examine new opportunities and challenges for ancient DNA research in archaeology.

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes or a poster, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 15, 2018. We will offer travel awards to multiple attendees, and encourage submissions from early-career scholars.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Genetic and archaeological perspectives on gene-culture co-evolution (e.g., lactase persistence and dairying in Neolithic Europe, high altitude adaptation and the peopling of the Tibetan Plateau, etc.)
  • Using ancient DNA to understand migration, exchange, and cross-cultural connections
  • Ancient DNA from plants and animals
  • Unconventional sources of ancient DNA data (e.g., environmental DNA in soils for identifying flora and fauna that do not preserve in the zooarchaeological or archaeobotanical record, dental calculus as a source of aDNA data on the oral microbiome, etc.)
  • Defining and naming ancient populations
  • Ethical considerations in aDNA research and involving descendant communities

For questions about this Call for Papers, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2019 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.


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Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2018

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

 

October 4, 2018:
Gretel Rodríguez (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
The Arch of Constantine and the Use of Colored Marbles in Late Antique Architecture

October 11, 2018:
Robert Preucel (Anthropology, Brown University)
The Predicament of Ontology

October 18, 2018:
Lauren Yapp (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Reclaimed or Reified? When Colonial Modernity becomes Cultural Heritage

October 25, 2018:
Georgia Andreou (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Cyprus Ancient Shoreline Project: How does coastal erosion fit the archaeological narrative?

November 1, 2018:
Jennifer Bates (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Life in Indus Households: an exploration of SPatial ACtivity Environments

November 8, 2018:
Nicholas Emlen (National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, John Carter Brown Library)

November 15 , 2018:
Surekha Davies (InterAmericas Fellow, John Carter Brown Library)

November 29, 2018:
Praveena Gullapalli (Rhode Island College)

December 6, 2018:
Evan Levine and Daniel Plekhov (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

CFP: Archaeology and Social Justice

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2018:
Archaeology and Social Justice

Friday, March 2 – Saturday, March 3, 2018
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018.  The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, and is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.  Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students.  While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.

Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and, most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.

This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present. We welcome papers that explore the relationship between archaeology and the present political climate, with the intention of addressing the challenges currently facing the field of archaeology and the academy more broadly. We also seek to engage in conversations about the biases and structural problems that make archaeology more accessible to some than to others, in order to help the discipline reach a broader and more inclusive public.

The workshop will include four sessions, each addressing issues of the relationship of archaeology to ongoing struggles for social justice and/or the role of archaeology in those struggles. Rather than predefining the content of these sessions, we intend to shape them with contributions from this call for papers; we wish to offer an open space for discussion of the following, and other, relevant issues:

  • The materiality and temporality of current social issues
  • Disciplinary decolonization
  • Archaeology’s role in discussions of “diversity and inclusion”
  • Identity and inequality in the past and present
  • Structural and practical access to archaeology and the academy
  • Activism and engagement within archaeology
  • Archaeology in/of social justice movements
  • Archaeology’s relationship to white nationalism
  • Archaeology in moments of crisis

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 1, 2017.

For questions about this CFP, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.


Download Call for Papers
 


Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2016

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

September 29, 2016
Katherine Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Zooarchaeological and Genetic Evidence for Cattle Domestication in Ancient China

October 13, 2016
Sophie Moore (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Archives Are Archaeological Objects

October 20, 2016
Bathsheba Demuth (History, Brown University)
Agency Sits in Places: Arctic Ecology and Modern Ideology in the Bering Strait, 1840-1980

October 27, 2016
Jeff Moser (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
Excavating China’s First Archaeologist

November 3, 2016
Laura Hawkins (Egyptology and Assyriology, Brown University)
Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts

November 10, 2016
Benjamin Alberti (Framingham College)
Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina

November 17, 2016
Meltem Toksoz (Middle East Studies, Brown University)
Archaeology as History: 19th century Ottoman Conceptualizations

December 1, 2016
Emily Booker (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Material Girls in a Material World: Anthropomorphic Clay Figurines on Cyprus from 1750-750 BCE

December 8, 2016
JIAAW Fall 2016 Proctor Presentations

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2015

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

October 1, 2015:
Nicholas Carter (Haffenreffer Museum, Brown University)
Hinterland History and Hierarchy: The Transformation of a Late Classic Maya Landscape

October 8, 2015:
Douglas Armstrong (Syracuse University)
Small Farm to Large Scale Plantation: The Shift to Capitalism and Slavery in Barbados… and a Preliminary Look at “The Cave of Iron”

October 15, 2015:
Parker VanValkenburgh (Anthropology, Brown University)
El Contrato del Mar: Forced Resettlement and Maritime Subsistence at Carrizales, Zaña Valley, Peru

October 22, 2015:
Tate Paulette (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
“Not to Know Beer Is Not Normal”: The Archaeological Invisibility of Beer and Brewing in Bronze Age Mesopotamia

October 29, 2015:
Ian Randall (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
A Connected Insularity: Conceptualizing Byzantium’s Island Frontiers

November 19, 2015:
Margaret Andrews (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Construction of Commemorative Landscapes in Rome’s Subura during the Imperial and Christian Periods

December 3, 2015:
Jen Thum (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
“Ramesses was Here”: Royal Rock Inscriptions at the Ends of the Egyptian World

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2015

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

February 12, 2015:
Andrew Dufton (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
How Do You Solve a Problem Like the City?

February 19, 2015:
Kathryn Howley (Egyptology & Assyriology, Brown University)
Foreign Exchange: The Role of Egyptian Material Culture in Middle Napatan Nubia

February 26, 2015:
Sarah Newman (Anthropology, Brown University)
Sharks in the Jungle: Real and Imagined Sea Monsters of the Maya

March 5, 2015:
Martin Furholt (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany)
Changing Materialities and the Mobilization of Social Practices: The Expansion of the Neolithic Out of Anatolia

March 12, 2015:
Kathryn McBride (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Extreme Hoarders: Coin Hoards and Entangled Practices in Roman Scotland

March 19, 2015:
Alexander Smith (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Indigeneity and Colonial Response: The Metamorphoses of Balearic Culture in the Late Iron Age

April 9, 2015:
Clive Vella (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Against Change: The Central Mediterranean, Desired Stability, and the Never-Ending Pursuit

April 16, 2015:
Mireia López-Bertran (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
Bodies, Jars and Figurines of the Punic Mediterranean

April 23, 2015:
Tamara Chin (Comparative Literature, Brown University)
Afterlife Economies: Archaeological and Literary Contexts of Money in Early China

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2014

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

September 25, 2014:
Miriam Müller  (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Ancestor Cults and Household Identity at Tell el-Dab’a, Avaris

October 9, 2014:
Brett Kaufman (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Politics, Prayer, and Pollution at the Neo-Punic Urban Mound of Zita, Southern Tunisia

October 16, 2014:
James Osborne (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Return to Mesopotamia: The Iron Age Diaspora and the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey

October 23, 2014:
Matthew Reilly (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Race on the Caribbean Plantation: Archaeology and the “Redlegs” of Barbados

October 30, 2014:
Anne Hunnell Chen (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
New Directions at the Late Antique Palace ‘Felix Romuliana’

November 6, 2014:
Mihalis Kavouriaris (The Ikarian Centre)
A Modern Greek Course for Archaeologists on the Island of Ikaria

November 13, 2014:
Patricia McAnany (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Beyond Colonial Churches: Community Archaeology at Tahcabo, Yucatán

November 20, 2014:
Hallie Meredith (University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)
Engaging Objects: Openwork Vessels and Gold-Glass from the Late Roman Period

Greek Archaeology Introduction

Greek Archaeology

                                 happy-4th-birthday-acropolis-museum

                      ARCH 0420 Archaeologies of the Greek Past – Fotini Kondyli  

From Bronze Age palaces to the Acropolis in Athens and on the trail of Alexander the Great, this course explores the ancient Greek world through archaeology—using art, architecture, and everyday objects to learn about ancient Greek society, from the monumental to the mundane. It also considers how we experience ancient Greece today, including questions about archaeological practice, the antiquities trade, and cultural heritage. WRIT.

Follow the class’ blog on current views on Greek archaeology, discoveries, debates, politics and archaeology here: http://blogs.brown.edu/arch-0420-2014-spring-s01/

Course website: http://proteus.brown.edu/greekpast2014/Home

Meets: MWF 1:00-1:50pm, Rhode Island Hall 108

To view all blog posts for this class, click on Greek Archaeology at the top right of this page.

Islamic Archaeology Introduction

Islamic Archaeology

Conquest to Conversion: The Formation of the Islamic World

 ARCH 1620  |  Tu/Thu 10.30-11.50  |  Rhode Island Hall 008

Corisande Fenwick 

How did a small group of tribes from Arabia create one of the largest empires the world has ever seen and how did their religion – Islam – come to be a major world religion?  This course challenges monolithic understandings of life in the early Islamic world by highlighting its vibrant cultures, sophisticated technologies, complex cities, monumental architecture and far-reaching commercial networks. Following in the footsteps of Arab-Muslim soldiers, scholars, traders, explorers and missionaries, we will move between Arabia, the imperial centres of Baghdad and Damascus and the furthest reaches of the Arab-Islamic world from Spain to sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian Ocean. We will use the evidence of texts, landscapes, architecture and images to examine how an Arab empire emerged, to explore what it meant to be Muslim and/or Arab, and to understand social life in the first three centuries of Islam (600-900CE).

To view all blog posts for this class, click on Islamic Archaeology at the top right of this page.

Material Networks Introduction

Material Networks

The movement of people and objects has always stood at the heart of endeavors to understand the course and processes of human history. In the Mediterranean, evidence of such movements is particularly abundant, and issues like migration, colonialism and exchange have played prominent roles in archaeological, historical and anthropological discussions.

Migration and Material Culture

Migration and Material Culture

This course explores Mediterranean migration past and present through the lens of material culture by zooming in on the material surroundings of migrants and their host societies and by tracing the connections that they forged across the Mediterranean seas.

ARCH 2230  |  Wed 3.00-5.20  |  Rhode Island Hall 008

Peter van Dommelen

To view all blog posts for this class, click on Material Networks at the top right of this page.