Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2016

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

September 29, 2016
Katherine Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Zooarchaeological and Genetic Evidence for Cattle Domestication in Ancient China

October 13, 2016
Sophie Moore (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Archives Are Archaeological Objects

October 20, 2016
Bathsheba Demuth (History, Brown University)
Agency Sits in Places: Arctic Ecology and Modern Ideology in the Bering Strait, 1840-1980

October 27, 2016
Jeff Moser (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
Excavating China’s First Archaeologist

November 3, 2016
Laura Hawkins (Egyptology and Assyriology, Brown University)
Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts

November 10, 2016
Benjamin Alberti (Framingham College)
Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina

November 17, 2016
Meltem Toksoz (Middle East Studies, Brown University)
Archaeology as History: 19th century Ottoman Conceptualizations

December 1, 2016
Emily Booker (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Material Girls in a Material World: Anthropomorphic Clay Figurines on Cyprus from 1750-750 BCE

December 8, 2016
JIAAW Fall 2016 Proctor Presentations

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2016

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

 

February 18, 2016:
Craig Cipolla (Royal Ontario Museum)
Mending Stone: Confronting Vibrant Matters in New England Heritage

March 3, 2016:
Jonathan Ruane (Boston University)
Urban Geography at the Classic Maya Center of Xultun, Guatemala: Neighborhoods and the Ordering of Space

March 10, 2016:
David Quixal (Universitat de València)
Settlement Pattern and Cultural Change from the Iron Age to the Roman Period in the Inland Valencia (Eastern Iberia)

March 17, 2016:
Catie Steidl (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Isn’t It Ionic? [Don’t You Think?]

March 24, 2016:
Pinar Durgun (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Putting the Dead in Their Place: Anatolian Cemeteries in Context

April 7, 2016:
Miguel Angel Cau Ontiveros (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Pollentia (Mallorca, Balearic Islands): The Transformation of a Provincial Roman City

April 14, 2016:
Ignacio Grau (Universidad de Alicante)
Social Meanings of Fortified Landscape in the Iberian Iron Age

April 21, 2016:
Itohan Osayimwese (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
Sea, Wall, Camp: Architecture and the Migration Crisis in Europe

April 28, 2016:
Yongsong Huang (Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Brown University)
Linking Climate Change with Cultural and Anthropological Events Using  Recalcitrant Lipids in Archaeological Remains

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2015

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

October 1, 2015:
Nicholas Carter (Haffenreffer Museum, Brown University)
Hinterland History and Hierarchy: The Transformation of a Late Classic Maya Landscape

October 8, 2015:
Douglas Armstrong (Syracuse University)
Small Farm to Large Scale Plantation: The Shift to Capitalism and Slavery in Barbados… and a Preliminary Look at “The Cave of Iron”

October 15, 2015:
Parker VanValkenburgh (Anthropology, Brown University)
El Contrato del Mar: Forced Resettlement and Maritime Subsistence at Carrizales, Zaña Valley, Peru

October 22, 2015:
Tate Paulette (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
“Not to Know Beer Is Not Normal”: The Archaeological Invisibility of Beer and Brewing in Bronze Age Mesopotamia

October 29, 2015:
Ian Randall (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
A Connected Insularity: Conceptualizing Byzantium’s Island Frontiers

November 19, 2015:
Margaret Andrews (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Construction of Commemorative Landscapes in Rome’s Subura during the Imperial and Christian Periods

December 3, 2015:
Jen Thum (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
“Ramesses was Here”: Royal Rock Inscriptions at the Ends of the Egyptian World

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2015

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

February 12, 2015:
Andrew Dufton (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
How Do You Solve a Problem Like the City?

February 19, 2015:
Kathryn Howley (Egyptology & Assyriology, Brown University)
Foreign Exchange: The Role of Egyptian Material Culture in Middle Napatan Nubia

February 26, 2015:
Sarah Newman (Anthropology, Brown University)
Sharks in the Jungle: Real and Imagined Sea Monsters of the Maya

March 5, 2015:
Martin Furholt (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany)
Changing Materialities and the Mobilization of Social Practices: The Expansion of the Neolithic Out of Anatolia

March 12, 2015:
Kathryn McBride (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Extreme Hoarders: Coin Hoards and Entangled Practices in Roman Scotland

March 19, 2015:
Alexander Smith (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Indigeneity and Colonial Response: The Metamorphoses of Balearic Culture in the Late Iron Age

April 9, 2015:
Clive Vella (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Against Change: The Central Mediterranean, Desired Stability, and the Never-Ending Pursuit

April 16, 2015:
Mireia López-Bertran (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
Bodies, Jars and Figurines of the Punic Mediterranean

April 23, 2015:
Tamara Chin (Comparative Literature, Brown University)
Afterlife Economies: Archaeological and Literary Contexts of Money in Early China

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2014

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

September 25, 2014:
Miriam Müller  (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Ancestor Cults and Household Identity at Tell el-Dab’a, Avaris

October 9, 2014:
Brett Kaufman (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Politics, Prayer, and Pollution at the Neo-Punic Urban Mound of Zita, Southern Tunisia

October 16, 2014:
James Osborne (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Return to Mesopotamia: The Iron Age Diaspora and the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey

October 23, 2014:
Matthew Reilly (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Race on the Caribbean Plantation: Archaeology and the “Redlegs” of Barbados

October 30, 2014:
Anne Hunnell Chen (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
New Directions at the Late Antique Palace ‘Felix Romuliana’

November 6, 2014:
Mihalis Kavouriaris (The Ikarian Centre)
A Modern Greek Course for Archaeologists on the Island of Ikaria

November 13, 2014:
Patricia McAnany (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Beyond Colonial Churches: Community Archaeology at Tahcabo, Yucatán

November 20, 2014:
Hallie Meredith (University of Massachusetts Dartmouth)
Engaging Objects: Openwork Vessels and Gold-Glass from the Late Roman Period

The Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque-University of Fez by Zakaria Enzminger

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Buildings within a human context can have multiple functions. These constructions can be viewed as statements of power, authority, wealth or timelessness of individuals or institutions. However, it is also necessary to acknowledge the practical aspects of the building in its common or private usage, as well as the statement it makes about the people to whom it applies. In our studies on the growing and developing urban character of the various Islamic empires, the mosque as a necessary addition to preexisting settlements or a central feature of newly established urban centers has been  at the fore. It functioned as a place of gathering for believers to fulfill their religious obligations, as a medium for rulers to address and reinforce their relation to their subjects, as well as a statement of the dominance of Islam as the official religion. For the purpose of this inquiry, I will be looking at the Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque and Madrasa of Fez as an expression of the origins of the city of Fez, and as the center of scholastic Islam for centuries to come, attracting scholars and students from across the Mediterranean.

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Quasyr ‘Amra and the Umayyad bathhouse (Jordan) by Ian Randall

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In the dusty Balqa region of eastern Jordan there sits a modest structure of roughly hewn stone, set until the early part of the 20th century amidst a charming grove of terebinth and pistachio trees. Now starkly surrounded by gravel, dust, and a visitor’s center, the building appears unusual unless you are familiar with the type (Figures 1 & 2). It consists of a large hall, some fourteen by ten and a half meters, capped by three longitudinal barrel vaults (Figure 3 & 4). Directly off this hall at a right angle are three more, significantly smaller rooms, with an additional room beyond the last, only accessible from the outside. The second and third rooms beyond the hall have deep depressions in their floors.  Beyond its construction, which is clearly designed for a specific purpose, the feature of this building that has attracted the attention of scholars, from its first discovery for the West by the colorful adventurer/academic Alois Musil in 1896, is its vibrant wall paintings, 450 m2 of dancers, entertainers, mythological scenes, hunters, builders, naked women, and kings (Figures 5, 6, & 7).

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Madina al-Zahra (Spain) by Serena Alwani

The palace-city of Madina al-Zahra in Spain was built in 936 CE under the Caliph ‘Abd al-Rahman III in a hillside at the base of the Sierra Morena. This location, some distance from Cordoba in a lush and well-watered landscape, lends to the complex being functionally more diverse and self-sufficient than its predecessors. Though excavations at the site began in 1910, still only about 10 percent has been properly explored. It is a significant site as one of few royal palace-cities that were not built over in later years (Ruggles 2002 pp. 53).

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Hagia Sophia by Zohra Kalani

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The Hagia Sophia is by far one of the most astounding beacons of art and architecture in history. Its walls have seen the reigns of some of the strongest empires of the past, and this rich political and religious history resonates to this day. Once a church, later a mosque, and now a museum, the Hagia Sophia has been a precious gem in the world of architecture. Located in modern-day Istanbul, it is situated at the crossroads of two powerful empires, the Byzantines and the Ottomans. It is the grand representation of two great faiths, and now serves a secular purpose in educating its visitors about the rich history it contains.

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