S.O.S.!!!

S.O.S.!!!, U.S.A., Ship of State was a publication created by Jozef Mlot-Mroz, a Polish immigrant to the United States. Based out of Salem, Massachusetts, Mlot-Mroz was a very active anti-communist and anti-Semetic extremist. Mlot-Mroz activism was mostly based around the concept that communism was created by Jews to destroy Christianity. Mlot-Mroz was often seen at protests in and around the Boston area[1] and was known for his provocative slogans like “Fight and Destroy Jewish Zionist Conspiracy Today” or burning Israeli flags.[2]  Mlot-Mroz was also heavily involved in other groups such as  The Anti-Communist Confederation of Polish Freedom Fighters in United States of America and The New England Captive Nations Committee.[3]

S.O.S.!!! (March 1969)

S.O.S.!!! (March 1969)

S.O.S.!!!  Inside (March 1969)

S.O.S.!!! Inside (March 1969)

S.O.S.!!!  Back Cover (March 1969)

S.O.S.!!! Back Cover (March 1969)

[1] http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1989/4/18/promise-of-a-positive-left-pbabs/

[2] http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/forgive-us-our-trespasses

[3] http://www.commentarymagazine.com/article/nazi-war-criminals/

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Dr. Spock Demonstration

Dr. Benjamin Spock a pediatrician famous for writing the extremely popular book “Baby and Child Care” was born in 1903 and passed away in 1998. [1]  Dr. Spock was also a left wing political activist who even running for president on the People’s Party ticket. [2] In particular Spock became well known as an anti-Vietnam War activist.

In 1968 Dr. Spock was convicted of “conspiring to counsel evasion of the draft” along with four other people from Boston. [3] Throughout 1967 and 1968 Dr. Spock was involved in various protests to the Vietnam War which culminated in an October 16, 1967 event in which a few hundred people burned their draft cards. In January of 1968 Dr. Spock was indicted and in July he was sentenced to federal prison.[4] Later, the two-year sentence was appealed and overturned before he served any time. [5]

The photos below are from a protest in Post Office Square in Boston in  1968 in response to Dr. Spock being indicted.

Dr. Spock Demonstration Arlington Street Church Boston, MA (June 24,  1968)

Dr. Spock Demonstration Post Office Square Boston, MA (1968)

Dr. Spock Demonstration Arlington Street Church Boston, MA (June 24,  1968)

Dr. Spock Demonstration Post Office Square Boston, MA (1968)

Dr. Spock Demonstration Arlington Street Church Boston, MA (June 24,  1968)

Dr. Spock Demonstration Arlington Street Church Boston, MA (1968)

 

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Spock

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Spock

[3] http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/05/17/specials/spock-guilty.html

[4] http://www.massmoments.org/moment.cfm?mid=201

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Spock

 

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Key Records

Key Records was a conservative record label based out of Los Angeles, California, run by a man named Vick Knight that existed in the 1950s and 1960s. [1] Knight who was born in 1908 and died in 1984 was a songwriter, composers, and record producer among other things although very little information is available about him online. [2] Many of Key Records releases were recordings of speeches by right wing political figures like Robert Welch and Ronald Reagan, but they also released original songs sung by artists such as Wini Beatty such as “Folks Songs For Taxpayers.” Common themes for Key Records recordings include: libertarianism,  small government, anti-communism, anti-liberalism, anti-income tax, and free market capitalism. Although there are numerous catalogs and flyers for Key Records as seen below, there seem to be no actual audio recordings in the Hall Hoag collection. However there are some recordings online. I have included the cover of a catalog from 1966 and a 1962 letter from Vick Knight to Peter Flynn who apparently worked at the WTAG radio station in Massachusetts. In the letter Knight states the purpose of the label to the “gradual but increasingly apparent loss of our sovereignty as a nation.”

Key Records Catalog (1966)

Key Records Catalog (1966)

Vick Knight Letter (1962)

Vick Knight Letter (1962)

[1] http://rateyourmusic.com/label/key_records_f1

[2] http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2012/12/walter-brennans-hes-your-uncle-not-your-dad-part-two-and-vick-knight-and-the-key-records-story.html

 

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Ka Huliau

Ka Huliau or “The Turning Point” was a left leaning, underground, independent newspaper printed by  Hawaii Education for Social Progress, Inc..[1][2] Published in the 1980s (presumably from 1982-1986) Ka Huliau self-identified as “An independent newspaper focusing on Hawaii and Pacific issues.” These issues included labor strikes, nuclear proliferation, socialism and others primarily in the context of their effect on Hawaiians and other Islanders. The inclusion of Ku Huliau in the collections illustrates (as have some previous posts) that Gordon Hall collected items that really span the entire country. Admittedly items from Hawaii are fairly sparse. There are only a few copies of Ka Huliau in the Hall Hoag collection and I have included the covers of two of them from 1983.

Ka Huliau (1983)

Ka Huliau (1983)

Ka Huliau (1983)

Ka Huliau (1983)

[1] http://vufind.carli.illinois.edu/vf-uiu/Record/uiu_4306676

[2] http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94023109/

 

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Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan (Waco, TX)

Gordon Hall and his team of volunteers would often write to extremist groups in the guise of someone interested in joining. In return groups would send them recruitment packages usually containing information about the group and some of their publications.

Below are some items from a package sent by the Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. The package includes a few copies of the “White Patriot” newspaper, a hand written note from the grand dragon of the Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Michael Lowe, stickers and a few party balloons.

Stickers

Stickers

Balloons

Balloons

Lowe gained some publicity in the mid 90s because he was represented by an African American lawyer, Anthony P. Griffin [1] in a case that involved the harassment and assault of African American residents in Vidor, Texas.[2]

It can be difficult to track the history of all of the different branches of the KKK. This history of the KKK in Texas is similar to other parts of the country in that is was started in the 1860s during reconstruction with an ebb and flow of membership and activity in the decades that followed. The Texas Knights became well known KKK in the 1990s around the time that this package was sent to Gordon Hall and often found themselves in the center of controversy in Texas. Indeed, Lowe proudly writes in his letter that his Klan group in the one the Anti-Defamation League stated “were the one to be concerned about and to watch.”

Hand Written Note from Michael Lowe

Hand Written Note from Michael Lowe

Hand Written Note from Michael Lowe Page 2

Hand Written Note from Michael Lowe Page 2

[1] http://www.nytimes.com/1993/09/10/news/a-klansman-s-black-lawyer-and-a-principle.html

[2] http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/vek02

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