Jesus To The Communist World

Jesus To The Communist World, also known as the “Voice of the Martyrs” was created in 1967 a Romanian Christian minister named Richard Wurmbrand. Wurmbrand born in 1909 in Romanian was anti-communist believing that Christianity and Communist were incompatible.[1] While in Romanian he was imprisoned and tortured for his beliefs multiple times after the USSR took control of Romanian in 1944. In the late 1940s he was imprisoned for 8 and a half years and then again in 1959 he was sentenced to 25 years in prison.[2] He was released from prison for the last time in 1964 for $10,000 leaving Romanian and eventually moving to the United States in 1966. Wurmbrand started to the Voice of the Martyr publication to expose the persecution of Christians around the world especially in Communist and Muslim countries. Wurmbrand died in 2001 in California.

Jesus To The Communist World 1 (1980s)

Jesus To The Communist World 1 (1980s)

 

Jesus To The Communist World 2 (1980s)

Jesus To The Communist World 2 (1980s)

 

Jesus To The Communist World 3 (1980s)

Jesus To The Communist World 3 (1980s)

 

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wurmbrand

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wurmbrand

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John Patler

John Patler was born John C. Patsalos in 1938 in New York.  Patler became a member of the American Nazi Party after he was dishonorably discharged from the Marines after attending a Pro-Nazi rally.[1] Patler served as the editor of the ANP magazine “Stromtrooper” and was moving up in the ranks until he was kicked out of the group after a disagreement with ANP founder and leader George Lincoln Rockwell. Several months later in 1967 Patler assassinated Rockwell and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Patler was released from prison in 1975, changed his name back to Patsalos and moved to New York. [2]

John Patler (Mid-1960s)

John Patler (Left) (Mid-1960s)

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Patler

[2] http://en.metapedia.org/wiki/John_Patler

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Photograph Preservation

As part of an internship program with the Simmons College School of Library and Information Science  LIS student, Michelle Montalbano has been working this semester with the Hall-Hoag collection. In particular she is organizing and describing the 14 record center boxes of thousands of photographs in the collection. Some of the photographs are identified and labeled, but most are not. Michelle is working to identify as many images as possible and then organize them so similar images are collocated. The end goal is to intellectually link to photographs to the organizations and people that also have printed material in the Hall-Hoag Collection. 

Along the way we found photographs that were in the need of preservation. Some of them were folded, bent and frayed with rounded edges that made them hard to fit into boxes. It also made the photographs more susceptible to further damage. We decided with the help of Rachel Lapkin, the university’s preservationist to flatten and press the photographs. We applied pressure to stacks of the photographs using a press that the university owns. We will leave the photographs under pressure for a few weeks. After checking the progress we maybe have to add a bit of moisture to the images and re-press them in they are not flattened at that time.

Damaged Photographs 1

Damaged Photographs 1

Damaged Photographs 2

Damaged Photographs 2

 

Photo Press 1

Photo Press 1

Photo Press 2

Photo Press 2

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Environmental Defense Fund

The Environmental Defense Fund, founded in 1967 in New York, is a very large and active global environmental not for profit group that current has 700,000 members.  Since the 1960s and moving forward the EDF has taken on various green campaigns including legislation against the use of chemicals like DDT, clean air and water acts, pollution reduction, and global warming initiatives.[1] The EDF probably would not be considered by most an extremist environmental group and even according their own site they “believe economic prosperity and environmental stewardship go hand in hand.” [2] They tend to seek collaborative, “market-based” solutions to environmental issues and even have corporate partnerships with companies like FedEx and McDonalds.

However, looking at the items below, the language like “taking offenders to court” is a much more confrontational than what you see on their website now. It seems like the EDF must have gradually moved away from some of its more radical/militant approaches and rhetoric. The EDF is one of many groups in the collection that probably would not be considered very extreme now, but at the time it was collected would be categorized by Gordon Hall as “dissenting” or “groups that were not yet extremist, but might at some point turn in that direction.”

Environmental Defense Fund (1984 Front)

Environmental Defense Fund (1984 Front)

Environmental Defense Fund (1984 Back)

Environmental Defense Fund (1984 Back)

Environmental Defense Fund (1971 Front)

Environmental Defense Fund (1971 Front)

Environmental Defense Fund (1971 Back)

Environmental Defense Fund (1971 Back)

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_Defense_Fund

[2] http://www.edf.org/about

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Emergency Civil Liberties Committee

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (later The National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee) was started in 1951 in response to the McCarran Act or the “Subversive Activities Control Act of 1950.” The mission of the organization was to defend the rights of “free speech, religion, travel, and assembly.” [1] The McCarran Act was one of the driving forces behind the “Red Scare” of the 1950s and the rise of McCarthyism. The group was modeled as a more vigorous version of the American Civil Liberties Union and participated directly in the defense of those charged as communists and subversives under the McCarran Act.[1] Throughout the 1950s the NECLC was accused of being a communist front organization because the group was founded and run by people like its chairman Corliss Lamont who were not members of  the Communist Party USA but were known as fellow travelers. [3] Lamont was also previously the director of the ACLU.[4]

The NECLC merged with the Center for Constitution Rights in 1998 but had previously taken cases involving the draft and anti-war protests, child welfare and immigration.[1] They also represented James Peck, a Freedom Rider beaten by the KKK in 1961 who sued the FBI in 1976 for having knowledge of his attack and not acting. The NECLC was run by Edith Tiger from 1968 until 1998.

I have included a reprinting of the Bill of Rights and a few pages from one of their publications about the McCarran Act (and a cartoon that I do not understand at all).

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Reprint Bill of Rights

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Reprint Bill of Rights

 

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963  Cover)

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963 Cover)

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963 Inside)

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963 Inside)

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963  Back Cover)

Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (March 1963 Back Cover)

 

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Emergency_Civil_Liberties_Committee

[2] http://keywiki.org/National_Emergency_Civil_Liberties_Committee

[3] http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/printgroupProfile.asp?grpid=7022

[4] http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/individualProfile.asp?indid=1860Communist%20Party%20USA

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