CFP: Refuge and Refugees in the Ancient World, Columbia University (Abstracts due May 2)

Refuge and Refugees in the Ancient World
Columbia University Ancient World Graduate Student Conference
November 11-12, 2016. Columbia University in the City of New York, USA.

Keynote Speakers: Demetra Kasimis (University of Chicago) and Elena Isayev (University of Exeter)
We invite papers from graduate students working across disciplines related to the ancient world for a two-day conference which will explore the issues of refuge and refugees. From representations of refugees and the notions of “refuge” to their physical traces in the archaeological record, we hope to discuss how ancient societies experienced and conceptualized the flight and plight of displaced peoples.
In light of the recent upsurge in work on ancient Mediterranean migration and exile, as well as current events, new questions arise: What heuristic value does the term “refugee” have for our understanding of the ancient equivalent? How do we define refuge and refugees? Where do we look for the voices of refugees among the ancient evidence? What and where are the sites of “refuge” attested across the ancient Mediterranean world?
We welcome papers in any disciplinary field––and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged––pertaining to the ancient Mediterranean world and surrounding regions, including Egypt, the Near East and the expanses of the Roman Empire, and falling within the period spanning from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity.

Potential topics could include:
• Literary and artistic representations of flight, refuge, or supplication, for example in epic, tragedy, vase or wall painting.
• Classical reception (contemporary engagements with classical representations of refuge and refugees).
• Philosophical and theoretical conceptualizations of refuge, for example in Stoic thought.
• Locations of refuge, such as sanctuary spaces.
• Intersections between refugees and the related spheres of ancient migration, exile, and diaspora.
• Ancient histories of migration catalyzed by displacement through war or other factors.
• The demographic impact of ancient refugees on ancient cities, landscapes, and economies.
• Archaeological evidence, for example, hoards and their significance in tracing ancient refugees.
• Refugee identity, for example, the transition from being a “refugee” to becoming a citizen of a new city.

The conference will include a roundtable on how the content and themes discussed in the context of the ancient world can be brought into dialogue with the contemporary refugee crisis.
Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be emailed to cuconference2016@gmail.com no later than May 2, 2016. In the body of your email, please include your name, institution, contact information, and the title of your abstract. The abstract should be anonymous and sent as an attachment. Papers should be no longer than 20 minutes in length in order to accommodate questions.

Housing accommodations will be provided by Columbia graduate students on a first-come, first-served basis.
For more information please visit: cuancientrefugees2016.wordpress.com

Posted in CFP | Comments Off on CFP: Refuge and Refugees in the Ancient World, Columbia University (Abstracts due May 2)

Fieldwork Opportunity: Archaeological excavations in Corsica – Summer 2016

ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS
July 10-24, 2016
ACULONTRA (CORSICA)
Bronze Age settlement

The site of Aculontra is located in Gavignano, in Upper Corsica (Haute-Corse). It spreads over around 2000 m2. Three distinct archaeological entities have been identified: a medieval tower standing at its highest point, a cluster of 6 to 8 rectangular constructions thought to be protohistoric raised on the south slope of the massif and a statue-menhir that is no longer present.
The focus of the excavation is the protohistoric site which is situated on the southwest side, overlooking the Golu River. It includes at least six structures, of which four are lined up. Downhill and to the West, one or possibly two additional structures were almost entirely destroyed and reused during medieval or modern times. Constructions are of rectangular shape with right-angled quoins. A long side, which is regularised and cladded, always sits against the slope. Doors, even perhaps windows, are visible on the long sides. Walls are made with dry stone blocks of medium (30-50 cm) to very large size (up to 150 cm) with a random coursing. The angle stones are of parallelepiped shape. Elevations have been preserved up to a height of 3 m. The construction close to the summit is the only one to show double faced stone walls. In addition, the site includes several small rock shelters and some of them have revealed splinters of human skulls as surface finds.
The excavation will consist in archaeological surveys (planimetry, altimetry, sections) along with a limited stratigraphic exploration of one of the rectangular structures. The objective is to define the chronology and function of the site in a region (Castagniccia) where very little is known about the Bronze Age period.

Participation requirements:
Student in archaeology, 18 years old minimum, antitetaneous vaccination, 2 week participation minimum, accommodation (campsite and gite) and meals are covered by the excavation.

For further information, please contact the scientific leader of the excavation:
Kewin PECHE-QUILICHINI (baiucheddu@gmx.fr)

 

Posted in Fieldwork Opportunity | Comments Off on Fieldwork Opportunity: Archaeological excavations in Corsica – Summer 2016

Fieldwork Opportunity: Western Argolid Regional Project

Summer 2016 is the final season of WARP, an interdisciplinary archaeological survey along the Inachos river, west of the city of Argos in southern Greece. This intensive pedestrian survey includes the known archaeological sites of the Classical polis of Orneai, Mycenaean chamber tombs, and fortifications of the Roman, Medieval, and Ottoman periods, as well as an extensive system of ancient roads and passes. Among the project’s aims are (a) to understand the settlement dynamics of Argos, an important center in virtually all periods of Greek history but whose hinterland is scarcely understood, and (b) to detect the networks that connected the micro-regions of the western Argolid to each other and to neighboring valleys in the northeastern Peloponnese. We seek undergraduate field walkers for this summer either as volunteers or as credit-earning field school students.

Participants stay on the beach in comfortable vacation apartments in the beautiful fishing village of Myloi on the Gulf of Argos. Saturday field trips include the major Bronze Age palace sites at Mycenae and Tiryns, the Classical sites of Nemea, Corinth, and Epidauros (where we also see a play in the ancient theater), and the Medieval fortress of Nauplio, as well as numerous local museums.

Dates: May 29 – July 10, 2016.

Deadline for Application: April 15, 2015 (This is a rolling deadline, which means that we process applications as we get them until the project fills and this may be before April 15, so apply early!).

Fee: $3750 (for volunteers); $4750 (in-state, CO)/$5750 (out-of-state) (for the six-credit field school). Fees include six-weeks of accommodation in Myloi, most meals and transportation during the project, and entrance to all sites and museums.

For further information, see https://www.archaeological.org/fieldwork/afob/13907 and https://studyabroad.colorado.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=899
Or email Dr. Dimitri Nakassis (d.nakassis@utoronto.ca) or Dr. Sarah James (sarah.a.james@colorado.edu)

Posted in Fieldwork Opportunity | Comments Off on Fieldwork Opportunity: Western Argolid Regional Project

CFP: Critical Perspectives on Culture and Preservation

Call for Papers and Panels – Critical Perspectives on Culture and Preservation: Precarity in our Past, Present, and Future Cultural Heritages

This year’s Critical Legal Conference will feature a stream on “Critical Perspectives on Culture and Preservation: Precarity in our Past, Present, and Future Cultural Heritages”, for which both paper and panel submissions are encouraged. The conference occurs between September 1st and 3rd, 2016 at Kent University.

The past few years have born witness to the destruction of places, spaces, and objects that carry unquantifiable historical, heritage, and cultural value. As the world gazes on, horrified, many critical questions arise in relation to preservation, protection, ownership, and intervention. What role can or does law have? And how is the view of law’s role shaped by critical legal and radical perspectives?

Atrocities committed against relics of the past are but one aspect of the greater question of the role of preservation and protection in our globalizing world. Just as the term “culture” can capture nearly endless possibilities, so too can the question of what should be protected and preserved as “culture”.

What about the destruction of that which exists intangibly within the boundaries of cultural spaces, and practices? As the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage enters its next decade, has it been successful in its goals and intentions? Questions of how to strengthen and better dedicate ourselves to the preservation of human culture go far beyond the physical and the physically destroyed. Much of what constitutes art and culture is intangible—yet these cultural aspects are as vital to human civilization as the towering ruins of the past.

Alongside the question of how law should (or should not) employ preservation strategies in areas of conflict and war, the question of how law should respond to the privatization and commodification of culture within neoliberal development initiatives also arises.

What about urban culture in our cities? As neighbourhoods face gentrifying forces and municipal redevelopment strategies, what important buildings and spaces should be preserved? How do we determine what to preserve? Can live music venues benefit from intangible cultural heritage protection? In the UK, can and should pubs receive protection through legal tools such as designation as an Asset of Community Value in the face of an owner’s development rights? Or, in New York City, does an otherwise unremarkable building, such as the Stonewall Inn, merit landmark designation based on past important events or the importance it carries to a community like the LGBT community?

Further, if we critically deconstruct existing decisions and paradigms to provide, or not to provide, legally enforceable protection to spaces, places, and objects, will we find a replication of the architectures of hegemony, unequal valuation, or even, recolonization? Or will we find something else? Is the notion of “culture” itself something hegemonic or colonial?

This stream seeks to engage the work of critical and radical scholars and perspectives working at the intersections of law, culture, preservation, and the governance of culture—municipally, domestically, and internationally—as well as those interested in tangible and intangible cultural heritage matters and our human right to culture in all of its varied forms. The goal is to create a lively critical dialogue surrounding how we will treat crucial issues in the preservation of our array of collective past, present, and future cultures moving forward.

Possible ideas for conference papers could include (but are absolutely not limited to):
–    The destruction or theft of cultural heritage in conflict regions.
–    The role of cultural preservation during periods of urbanization or urban redevelopment.
–    International or domestic law and the rise of tangible and intangible cultural heritage protection.
–    The interaction between governance and culture.

Paper Proposals should include an abstracts of no longer than 300 words and a brief author biography. Panel Proposals should include the panel title and rationale (of no more than 300 words) and abstracts and biographies for all participants in the panel. Please send your Paper and Panel Proposal to SaraRoss@osgoode.yorku.ca in a *.doc file. The Call Closes on 1 July 2016.

Posted in CFP | Comments Off on CFP: Critical Perspectives on Culture and Preservation

Fieldwork Opportunity: Apolline Project

Call for participants – Summer fieldwork opportunities in Pompeii and on the slopes of Mt. Vesuvius.

sca12

The Apolline Project is an open research network, which sheds light on the hitherto neglected past of the area to the north of Mt. Vesuvius, in the Bay of Naples. The project has run actively since 2004 and has several components, with current major work focusing on human skeletal remains from a Medieval church, excavation of a Roman villa with baths buried by multiple Vesuvian eruptions, and pottery from the Suburban Baths in Pompeii. We will also be starting a new excavation this summer at the Roman city of Aeclanum, in inland Campania; this excavation offers an excellent opportunity for students who want to see how a dig begins, from the ground up.

The Apolline Project is now accepting applications for its summer 2016 field season. Dig participants who join the first or last sessions of the Pollena excavation will have the opportunity to spend an additional week before (May 29- June 5) or after (Sept 24-Oct 1) their chosen session at the project’s accommodation for no additional charge in order to better explore the region (subject to availability).

This year we will be offering a select number of scholarships to participants.

For further information, including course descriptions and fieldwork opportunities, visit: http://www.apollineproject.org/dig.html.

 

 

Posted in Fieldwork Opportunity | Comments Off on Fieldwork Opportunity: Apolline Project

« Older Entries