Focus on Special Collections: Euclid’s Elements

Euclid’s Elements, composed 2400 years ago, is among the most ancient of Greek mathematical treatises and one of the first to be printed using movable type.  Complete with illustrations and diagrams, it has been considered an essential component of educational curricula for centuries.  At noon, on November 16, 2010, come to the Lownes Room in the John Hay Library to learn more about the history of the most influential textbook ever written.

Audubon's Sage Grouse on Display at John Hay Library

Audubon's Sage Grouse

A volume of John James Audubon’s master work, The Birds of America, is on display on the main floor of the John Hay Library. Each plate will be on display for only one month. This month’s bird is the “Cock of the Plains”.

This elephant folio edition of The Birds of America, bound in six volumes, was presented by Albert E. Lownes to the Library on the occasion of his 50th class reunion in 1970.

For more information please contact hay@brown.edu.

Focus on Special Collections: Euclid’s Elements

Euclid’s Elements, composed 2400 years ago, is among the most ancient of Greek mathematical treatises and one of the first to be printed using movable type.  Complete with illustrations and diagrams, it has been considered an essential component of educational curricula for centuries.  At noon, on November 16, 2010, come to the Lownes Room in the John Hay Library to learn more about the history of the most influential textbook ever written.

World War I and Brown

Induction into service, Faunce House, Oct 1918

In November 1919 President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”  The cessation of hostilities between the Allied nations and Germany occurred on November 11, 1918, the end of “the war to end all wars.”  World War 1 official ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles several months later.

Main Green, World War 1

During World War I Brown University adopted a wartime curriculum since the majority of students were enlisted men on active service.  University buildings were transformed to reflect this curriculum: Hope College and University, Maxcy, and Caswell Halls were turned into barracks; the first floor of Rockefeller Hall was a mess hall; Rhode Island Hall was the headquarters of the Student Army Training Corps; and the first floor of Manning Hall was the headquarters of the Naval Unit.  According to statistics published in 1919 by the War Records Committee, 1,974 alumni, faculty, and students were in military service during World War I.  The Soldiers Memorial Arch was dedicated on April 6, 1921, to the memory of the 41 alumni and students and one faculty member who died in service during the war.

Haitian Masks on display at the John Hay

Didier Civil’s papier-mache masks are on display at the John Hay Library November 10 – 12, 2010.  This exhibit is held in conjunction with the Haitian Studies Association Conference which will take place at Brown Nov. 10-13. Born in Jacmel, Haiti, where Carnival masks are part of a long tradition, Didier Civil represents Haitian cultural themes and voodoo subjects in his paintings and his masks. This year, his work was invited to lead the Halloween parade in Manhattan. Additional information can be found at Didier Civil‘s website.

Haitian Masks on display at the John Hay

Didier Civil’s papier-mache masks are on display at the John Hay Library November 10 – 12, 2010.  This exhibit is held in conjunction with the Haitian Studies Association Conference which will take place at Brown Nov. 10-13. Born in Jacmel, Haiti, where Carnival masks are part of a long tradition, Didier Civil represents Haitian cultural themes and voodoo subjects in his paintings and his masks. This year, his work was selected to lead the Halloween parade in Manhattan. Additional information can be found at Didier Civil‘s website.

Audubon’s Cock of the Plains on Display at John Hay Library

A volume of John James Audubon’s master work, The Birds of America, is on display on the main floor of the John Hay Library. Each plate will be on display for only one month. This month’s bird is the “Cock of the Plains”.

This elephant folio edition of The Birds of America, bound in six volumes, was presented by Albert E. Lownes to the Library on the occasion of his 50th class reunion in 1970.

For more information please contact hay@brown.edu.