Exhibit | From Gospel Hymns to “Mississippi Goddam”: the Evolving Soundtrack of the Civil Rights Era and Beyond

Music was a sonic weapon used by Civil Rights organizations against violence and oppression. Songs were used to inspire, unite and comfort participants at meetings, sit-ins, marches and in jail cells. Trace the journey for equality and the music it inspired, and discover iconic pieces that have become staples of protest movements around the world.

For more documents related to the Civil Rights era (particularly in Mississippi), see the Library’s ‘Freedom Now!’ archive, a cooperative digitizing project undertaken by Brown University and Tougaloo College:

Dates: May 1 – October 1, 2018
TimeLibrary Hours
Location: Orwig Music Library, 1 Young Orchard Avenue, Providence

Exhibit | Painting with Plaster: 3D Printing at the Brown University Library

Since 2016, the library has been printing 3D objects for students, faculty, and staff using a ProJet 660 Pro 3D printer, which creates colored objects out of gypsum powder.

This exhibit showcases some of the varied work created over the last two years using the printer and the artwork of Zak Ziebell ‘19, currently studying painting at RISD and Symbolic Systems at Brown University. He began working for the Rockefeller Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship in 2016, and was the Studio’s artist-in-residence over the summer of 2017.

For more information about the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio and its 3D printing services, please visit:  library.brown.edu/create/digitalstudio

Dates: May 1 – July 15, 2018
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

 

Exhibit | Selections from the Thomas H. Simon Circus Collection

Big Apple Circus, Twenty Years, 1997-1998 season program

Currently on View:  Selections from the Thomas H. Simon Circus Collection

The Thomas H. Simon Circus Collection contains more than 200 items, primarily about the American circus arts, including first-edition books, pennants, programs, stamps, drawings and promotional materials dating from the nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

Simon graduated with a degree in philosophy from Brown University in 1954. An avid reader of American history, he completed a Master of Arts in History at Xavier University in Cincinnati in 1987.  He was President of Schaefer Tailoring Company (Cincinnati), founder of People, Places and Things (1976), and served as a dedicated member of the Brown University Library Advisory Council for more than a decade.

Dates: May 1 – May 31, 2018
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Todd Haynes Image Books (1995 – 2017)

I’m Not There (2007) , Todd Haynes Image Book

Award-winning filmmaker Todd Haynes has created image books for each of his films beginning with Safe in 1995. In an interview with the New York Times, Haynes explained the books in terms of his process as “a way of communicating beyond words that gets to the crux of what the mood, temperature and stylistic references would be.” (January 28, 2016)

Todd Haynes graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in Art-Semiotics (1985). The director of Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, Poison, Dottie Gets Spanked, Safe, Velvet Goldmine, Far from Heaven, I’m Not There, Mildred Pierce, Carol, and Wonderstruck, Haynes was a pioneer of the New Queer Cinema movement and is known for his ongoing visual and narrative experiments within narrative cinema and television and his engagement with gender, sexuality, identity, mediation, and living inside/outside of “the mainstream.”

Currently on View:
Safe (1995)
Velvet Goldmine (1998)
Far from Heaven (2002)
Carol (2015)
Wonderstruck (2017)

Dates: May 1 – 4, 2018
Time: 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Discover.ed/Explor.ed/Inspir.ed: The artists’ books of Angela Lorenz ‘87

View two exhibitions of work by book artist and Brown alumna Angela Lorenz. Often witty and playful, Lorenz’s work is deceptively complex, influenced by her travels and informed by research in libraries and archives.

The Hay second-floor landing features a selection of Lorenz’s artists’ books exploring historical figures. A display in the Bopp Room showcases materials related to Lorenz’s most recent work, r.ed engender.ed, a graphic novel exploration of ephemera, vintage games and what it means to be an artist. The novel playfully features “r.ed monde,” a curious red figure Lorenz created while studying abroad in Bologna, Italy, in 1985.

Lecture and opening reception
April 17, 5:00 p.m., Lownes Room, John Hay Library

r.ed Day at the Hay: A r.ed-themed scavenger hunt
May 1, 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., John Hay Library

Dates: April 16 – May 28, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Exhibition Gallery, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Black Panther Comics

Marvel Comics Black Panther #31, 2001

“T’Challa is the Black Panther – a righteous king, noble Avenger, and fearsome warrior. Under his leadership, the African nation of Wakanda has flourished as one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world. And though he’s a card-carrying member of the Avengers, his first loyalty lies with his people, and he will defend them to his last breath.”  – Marvel

Black Panther, 1977, 1978, 2001
New York, New York: Marvel Comic Groups
Brown University Library, Special Collections

The Black Panther (T’Challa) made his comic strip debut in Fantastic Four: “The Black Panther” (Vol 1 #52) in July 1966. The superhero character premiered in his first solo series in 1977, followed by periodic runs through 2016.

Originally created by Stan Lee (writer) and Jack Kirby (penciler) during the era of the civil rights struggle, the comic addressed the lack of black superheroes in the broader American narrative.  The Black Panther’s significance is multilayered and includes anti-stereotypical representation, self-empowerment, and connectivity to Africa. T’Challa is as relevant today as when first created, as witnessed by the record-breaking box-office sales for the Black Panther movie and the character’s popularity on social media.

The Michael J. Ciaraldi Collection

Michael J. Ciaraldi began collecting in the early 1970s. The collection consists of 60,000 comic books, published from the 1970s to 1995. The most significant sections are comprised of magazine-format comics; graphic novels; fan and collector’s journals; reissues of classic “golden age” comics and newspaper strips; translations of Japanese “manga” and “anime” comics and European comic art; compilations of the work of comic artists; advertising ephemera; role-playing game materials; and adult erotica.

Dates: April 3 – 30, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Haggadah: Telling and Retelling the Story of Jewish Liberation 

Selections from the Dr. Steven Ungerleider Collection of Haggadot

The Dr. Steven Ungerleider Collection of Haggadot, presenting the text recited on the first two nights of the Jewish Passover, represents a remarkable array of geographic, linguistic, and temporal diversity. Encompassing more than four hundred years of Jewish culture, from the Ottoman Empire in 1505 to the State of Israel in the 1950s, the collection is comprised of haggadot from Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and the Near East. It incorporates a wide range of Jewish vernacular languages, from Yiddish and Ladino to Judeo-Italian and Judeo-Arabic in representative exemplars from Jewish communities across the globe, many long since dispersed.

The current exhibition, Haggadah: Telling and Retelling the Story of Jewish Liberation, highlights the breadth and depth of the Ungerleider Collection. This extraordinary gift to the University honors Dr. Steven Ungerleider’s father, Samuel Ungerleider, Jr. ‘39.

The exhibition will be on display in the lobby and main gallery of the John Hay Library from Monday, March 5, through Friday, June 15, 2018.

Dates: March 5 – June 15, 2018
Time: John Hay Library Hours
Location: Exhibition Gallery, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Familiar Wild Flowers

Common Scarlet Poppy or Red-Weed, 1895.

Familiar Wild Flowers (1897)                                                                                              F. Edward Hulme

Frederick Edward Hulme (1841–1909) was born in Hanley, Staffordshire, the son of an accomplished artist. He was a professor of drawing at King’s College London and a prolific writer on natural history, archeology, art instruction, flags of the world and other subjects. Familiar Wild Flowers was Hulme’s third publication and his most popular. Each volume contains 40 color plates and detailed descriptions with historical references for each flower. Eight of the nine volumes were published during his lifetime.

The author reveals the pleasure he took in his work in the preface to the first volume:

“The plants we have represented will be to many as old familiar friends, linked in their minds with sunny memories; and nothing that we can say or leave unsaid will either enhance or detract from their enjoyment. To those, however, who have yet to find in a new study this wealth of interest, we would venture to commend our pleasant labours, in the earnest hope that through them they may be led to enter for themselves on this enjoyable pursuit, and find, like ourselves, in the study of Nature an ever-increasing delight.”

Dates: March 5 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Greek Life – A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa at Brown

Greek Life – A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa at Brown
Selected Items On View From the Brown University Archives

For over 200 years Phi Beta Kappa has celebrated academic achievement and advocated for freedom of thought.  It is the oldest and most prestigious academic honors society in the United States.

The Rhode Island Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was founded at Brown University in 1830. Brown students elected to Phi Beta Kappa join a tradition that exemplifies the Phi Beta Kappa motto “Love of learning is the guide of life,” symbolized in the gold key.  Membership is diverse, connecting U.S. Presidents, Supreme Court Justices, Nobel Laureates, authors, diplomats, athletes, researchers, actors, and business leaders.

Dates: February 6 – March 30, 2018
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Lincoln Recordó en America Latina

LINCOLN RECORDÓ EN AMERICA LATINA

Selected Items on View at the John Hay Library:

“Canción a Abraham Lincoln” Lady’s Fan, c. 1865
Havana, Cuba
Brown University Library, Special Collections

Latin Americans observed, mourned and commemorated Abraham Lincoln’s life and legacy in a number of ways. Argentinians named a city in Buenos Aires Province for him. Statues of Lincoln can be found in Mexico, Cuba and Ecuador. Avenida Abraham Lincoln is a main thoroughfare in the city of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Shown here is a more personal object: a lady’s fan, thought to have been produced in Havana. It commemorates Lincoln’s life and assassination in both English and Spanish.

Vida de Abran Lincoln, décimo sesto presidente de los Estados Unidos
Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (1811–1888)
Nueva York, Estados Unidos: D. Appleton y Ca., 1866
Brown University Library, Special Collections

In May 1865, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento arrived in New York to take up his post as minister plenipotentiary to the United States from the newly reunified Argentine Republic. Arriving from a country in triumph to a country in deep mourning, Sarmiento heard a great deal and thought deeply about Lincoln, whose ideas about government he found engaging and with whom he felt he would have had much in common. Before the year was out, he had written a full length biography of the assassinated leader, whom he had never met, publishing it in his native Spanish in New York. “In the life of Lincoln,” Sarmiento wrote, “we find commonalities of existence in both Americas, and in the facts relating thereto must deduce lessons and useful warnings for our own government.”  The copy shown here was originally presented by Sarmiento, hot off the press, to the Library of Congress.

Dates: February 6 – 28, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence