Exhibit | Mail carried by Murier, an enslaved person

Letter from Christopher Scott to Nathan Nield, December 31, 1792
Brown University Library, Special Collections

This piece of paper, sent from Christopher Scott of Petersburg to Nathan Nield of Mercer County, served as both letter and, when folded, as envelope, with a red wax seal.

Known today as “slave carried mail,” this letter was carried by “a Negro woman Murier” and contains information about an exchange of Murier for another enslaved female named Christian.

The Library invites you to parse the contents of the letter. What does this artifact tell us about the history of the country? Of commerce in the U.S.? What does it tell us about the struggles women have faced as well as the fraught nature of relationships? Why is preserving items like this so important to contemporary research?

Dates: October 2 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Interested in Genealogy?

The Library has added two new genealogy databases:

With more than 1.5 billion names in over 4,000 databases, Ancestry Library includes records from the United States Census; military records; court, land and probate records; vital and church records; directories; passenger lists and more!

Fold3 provides convenient access to military records, including the stories, photos, and personal documents of the men and women who served. The Fold3 name comes from a traditional flag folding ceremony in which the third fold is made in honor and remembrance of veterans who served in defense of their country and to maintain peace throughout the world.

Check these out on the Database A-Z list!

Exhibit | Chew on This! Early Dental History & Library Collections

Chew on This! Early Dental History and Library Collections

Whether functional or cosmetic, concern for and care of teeth have long been a part of the human condition. Written accounts of dental practices and practitioners can be found in numerous cultures around the globe as early as 5000 BC, and the first identified book on the subject was published in 1530. The era of “modern” dentistry is marked by the publication of Le Chirurgien Dentiste (The Surgeon Dentist, A Treatise on Teeth) by French surgeon Pierre Fauchard in 1723. Since then, the care and treatment of teeth have continued to grow in distinction and professionalization.

Discover dental history of the 1800s through the Rhode Island Medical Society papers and collections at the Library, and examine some of the tools and text involved in the ever-evolving medical art of dentistry.

Dates: September 5 – 30, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Library Paging Service Down

The single-sign-on service (SSO) for Josiah that is hosted by Innovative is down.  This has been reported as an urgent problem.
Losing SSO means graduate / med / faculty patrons cannot page items from the Rock until service is restored.
In the meantime, users can request most materials from the Annex using the Blacklight discovery service (https://search.library.brown.edu) or login using the Affiliate login (name & barcode).

U.S. Congressional Serial Set Coming to Hein Online

We are excited to announce that the U.S. Congressional Serial Set is coming soon to HeinOnline! The Serial Set is an ongoing project in HeinOnline with the goal to add more than four million pages each year until completion.

It’s important to note that HeinOnline has always contained substantial portions of the Serial Set, including the American State Papers, comprehensive coverage of Foreign Relations of the United States, and thousands of House and Senate reports and documents inside compiled federal legislative histories. The current endeavor will ultimately complete and organize the content of the set into one easy-to-use, comprehensive location.

About the Collection

U.S. Congressional Serial Set
1817-Date

The United States Congressional Serial Set, commonly referred to as the Serial Set, is considered an essential publication for unveiling American history. Spanning more than two centuries and with more than 15,500 bound volumes, the records in this series include House and Senate Documents, as well as House and Senate Reports. The reports are usually from congressional committees dealing with proposed legislation and issues under investigation. The documents include all other papers ordered printed by the House or Senate. Documents cover a wide variety of topics, including reports of executive departments and independent organizations, reports of special investigations made for Congress, and annual reports of non-governmental organizations. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, executive-branch materials were also published in the Serial Set.

American State Papers
1789-1838

United States Congressional Documents from the period 1789 to 1817 are published under the title American State Papers, which consists of 38 volumes. The two series overlap, as American State Papers covers through 1838. Full coverage of the American State Papers are available within this collection inside HeinOnline.

Project Status

The Serial Set in HeinOnline currently includes:

  • Full index containing more than 380,000 records
  • 3,000 volumes and 3 million pages of integrated
    full-text volumes
  • Linking to more than 80% full-text volumes in HeinOnline
    or HathiTrust Digital Library

Project Status (as of 7/19/18)
Full-text volumes will be added monthly until completion.

Exhibit | Victory Won Pro-Life Bumper Stickers (1991–5)

Explore bumper stickers from the Hall-Hoag Collection produced by Victory Won from 1991-5, in support of the anti-abortion/pro-life/right-to-life movement. The movement in general terms seeks to prevent legal abortion and recriminalize the procedure, which was legalized, based on a woman’s right to privacy, in the 1973 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade.

The Gordon Hall and Grace Hoag Collection of Dissenting and
Extremist Printed Propaganda
The Hall-Hoag Collection exceeds 168,000 items emanating from over 5,000 organizations. It constitutes the country’s largest research collection of right- and left-wing U.S. extremist groups from 1950 to 1999.  Largely comprising pamphlets and leaflets, with smaller numbers of photos, audiovisual items, manuscripts and monographs, the unrivaled collection contains printed organizational literature meant for circulation among adherents and items used to proselytize. Materials represent the broad categories of culture, education, environment, gender, international relations, government, labor, media, non-extremism, politics, publishing, race, religion, sexuality, social issues, students and violence/militarism.

Dates: August 1 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Change in access to the clinical information resource “UpToDate”

Starting on August 1, 2018, UpToDate (UtD) will only be available through the intranets of Brown’s affiliated hospitals (Lifespan, CNE, VAMC) or by individual subscription, and not additionally through the University Library.

For the vast majority of the AMS community, this change will affect only the way that you access UtD.

  • Alpert Medical School students will still be able to use UtD via the Lifespan subscription, which is embedded in LifeChart, and is also available through the intranet.
  • Most of our physicians and residents have access to UtD through their hospital appointments. Lifespan, CNE, and the VA all have institutional subscriptions.

Students, faculty, and residents with an UpToDate Anywhere account will need to renew it through hospital access. If you need assistance, your hospital’s library or IS department should be able to assist you with this. You will not have access to UtD through Brown after 7/31/2018. For community-based faculty without hospital access privileges who were using our UtD subscription, we recommend DynaMed Plus.

The University Library will continue to provide all faculty, staff, students, and residents with complete access to DynaMed Plus, which features a robust app and remote access. More information on DynaMed Plus is available at libguides.brown.edu/health/featured.  Many other resources, such as ClinicalKey‘s “Clinical Overviews,” are available via the Library at http://libguides.brown.edu/health.

The decision to provide access to UtD only through our hospital partners was arrived at following consultation with Alpert Medical School leadership and AMS stakeholders after UtD representatives raised concerns about current access arrangements.  UtD charges Brown based on the number of 3rd and 4th year medical students, but faculty and residents could also access this resource through the University’s subscription (either by account or merely logging in through the Library). UtD requested that we limit access to students only with an extra layer of authentication, meaning that no clinical faculty would be able to use our subscription, even for strictly educational purposes.

Because AMS students can also access UtD via Lifespan, these requested restrictions put the Medical School and the Library in the position of paying for a duplicate subscription, with no additional benefit to University faculty or students.  To ensure that we are using our budget resources in the most effective and responsible manner, we prioritize providing our medical community access to materials that are not available through other affiliations.

If you have questions about this change, please feel free to contact Erika Sevetson, the Head of Health and Information Services at the Brown University Library, at Erika_Sevetson@Brown.edu.

Exhibit | Japanese Ceremonial and Other Vehicles, 1890

Matsuoka
Japan: Unknown, 1890
Brown University Library, Special Collections

Selected 19th Century prints with captions from a collection of 28 double-page wood engravings of two-wheeled ceremonial and other vehicles.

Dates: July 9 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence