Event | In the Mountains of Madness: A Reading with Author W. Scott Poole

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On Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, W. Scott Poole will give a reading from his new book, In the Mountains of Madness: The Life and Extraordinary Afterlife of H. P. Lovecraft. A discussion will follow the reading. This event is free and open to the public. The book will be available for purchase before and after the event.

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS (SEPTEMBER 2016, 978-1-59376-674-4)

In the Mountains of Madness interweaves the biography of the legendary writer with an exploration of Lovecraft as a phenomenon. It aims to explain this reclusive figure while also challenging some of the general views held by Lovecraft devotees, focusing specifically on the large cross-section of horror and science fiction fans who know Lovecraft through films, Role Playing Games, and video games directly influenced by his work, but who know little or nothing about him.

From a childhood wracked with fear and intense hallucinations, Lovecraft would eventually embrace the mystical, creating ways in which his unrestrained imaginary life intersected with the world he found so difficult to endure. The monsters of his dreams became his muses. Yet, Poole insists that Lovecraft was not the Victorian prude who wrote “squishy monster stories for boys.” Rather he was a kind of neo-romantic mystic whose love of the 18th century allowed him to bring together a bit of Isaac Newton with a bit of William Blake in a real marriage of heaven and hell.

More than a traditional biography, In the Mountains of Madness places Lovecraft and his work in a cultural context, as an artist more in tune with our time than his own. Much of the literary work on Lovecraft tries to place him in relation to Poe or M.R. James or Arthur Machen; these ideas have little meaning for most contemporary readers. In his provocative new book, Poole reclaims the true essence of Lovecraft in relation to the comics of Joe Lansdale, the novels of Stephen King, and some of the biggest blockbuster films in contemporary America, proving the undying influence of this rare and significant figure.

About W. Scott Poole

Poole, scott (c) Leslie McKellar (1)W. Scott Poole, who teaches at the College of Charleston, has written widely about American history, horror, and pop culture. His books include Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror and his award-winning history Monsters in America, which received the John G. Cawelti prize from the Popular Culture Association and was named among the “Best of the Best” by the AAUP for 2011. Poole is a regular contributor to Popmatters and his work has appeared in the Huffington Post, Religion Dispatches, and Killing the Buddha.

Date: Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Film Screening | DEFYING THE NAZIS: THE SHARPS’ WAR | A New Film by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky

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On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 8 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab in the Rockefeller Library, the Brown University Library will screen Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War, a new documentary by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky.

At 6 p.m. on the same night, the corresponding exhibit, A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II, will open with a reception at the John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Streeet, Providence. Martha Sharp Joukowsky, Ph.D.’58 PhB’82 LHD’85 P’87 GP’13 GP’14 GP’17, daughter of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, will speak at the reception.

Both events are free and open to the public.

The 90-minute film tells the story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, a Unitarian minister and his wife from Wellesley, Massachusetts, who left their children behind in the care of their parish and boldly committed to multiple life-threatening rescue missions in Europe, before and after the start of World War II. Over two dangerous years, they helped to save hundreds of imperiled political dissidents and Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazi occupation across Europe. Martha Dickie Sharp is a Brown alumna, Pembroke class of 1926.

Click here to view the trailer.

The story is cinematically told through the letters and journals of the Sharps, with Tom Hanks as the voice of Waitstill and Marina Goldman as the voice of Martha. It features firsthand interviews with the now adult children whom the Sharps saved, as well as leading historians, authors, and Holocaust scholars, including William Schulz, Deborah Dwork, Modecai Paldiel, Ghanda DiFiglia, and Yehuda Bauer.

“The story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp is one of the most incredible tales of compassion, sacrifice and heroism that I have ever heard, and I was completely unaware of it until five years ago when Artemis Joukowsky first shared it with me,” said Ken Burns. “Nearly three years before America as a nation became involved in the Second World War, these two unassuming, so-called ‘ordinary’ Americans gave up everything they knew and loved and risked their lives to become involved in a war 4,000 miles away because they knew there were people in grave danger who needed help.”

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Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

Artemis Joukowsky, a film producer and co-founder of No Limits Media, is the grandson of Waitstill and Martha Sharp and has spent decades researching their story. He is the author of a companion book to the film, featuring a foreword by Ken Burns, which was published by Beacon Press.

“Beyond the cloak-and-dagger suspense of my grandparents’ experience, it is a story of what America meant to refugees fleeing war-torn countries to build new lives. And it underscores what Waitstill would call ‘a collaborative effort’ of how a small but effective underground network of rescue workers saved as many lives as they could, and how important that lesson is for what is happening today,” said Joukowsky.

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This group is part of the Children’s Emigration Project of the Unitarian Service Committee in France, organized by Martha Sharp (standing back row, 3rd from left). The Diamant triplets are in the front row. Caption in scrapbook states: “Children’s Emigration, Six Nationalities from France, Dec 1940”

In January of 1939, as Americans remained mostly detached from news reports of the growing refugee crisis in the escalating war in Europe, Waitstill received a call from the Rev. Everett Baker, Vice President of the American Unitarian Association, asking if they would travel to Czechoslovakia to help provide relief to people trying to escape Nazi persecution. He invited Waitstill and Martha to take part in “the first intervention against evil by the denomination to be started immediately overseas.” The mission would involve secretly helping Jews, refugees, and dissidents to escape the expanding Nazi threat in Europe. If they were discovered, they would face imprisonment, probable torture, and death. Seventeen other members of the church had declined. With two young children at home, the Sharps accepted. They expected to be gone for several months.

Instead, their mission would last almost two years.

During this time, the Sharps would face harrowing encounters with Nazi police, narrowly escape arrest, and watch as the Third Reich invaded Eastern Europe. Their marriage would be tested severely and the two children they left behind would be saddened by their parents’ absence. But dozens of Jewish scientists, journalists, doctors, powerful anti-Nazi activists, and children would find their way to freedom and start new lives as a result of their efforts. To recognize their heroic sacrifice, Martha and Waitstill were honored at Yad Vashem in Israel and declared “Righteous Among the Nations.” Of the thousands so honored, there are only five Americans, including the Sharps.

“The Sharps’ early grasp of the true nature of the Nazi threat and their willingness to leave the safety of America and take action to help endangered refugees was a rare act at a time of widespread indifference,” said Sara J. Bloomfield, director, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. “Their courage and sacrifice should inspire us to reflect deeply on our own responsibilities in a world that also faces many challenges.”

In conjunction with the broadcast on September 20, a wide range of organizations will participate in community outreach and engagement activities, creating screening events and conversations that focus on what it means to be “righteous,” both as it relates to the Holocaust and genocide across the globe today. These include The United States Memorial Holocaust Museum, Hillel House, The Anti-Defamation League, The Unitarian Universalist Association, The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, Jewish Community Centers, The Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Keene State College, Brown University, Harvard University, No Limits Media and others (a full list is available at DefyingtheNazis.org). Both the Brown University Library and the Brown/RISD Hillel are hosting screenings.

Click here for more information about PBS broadcast.

In addition, WETA, the presenting public television station for Defying the Nazis, has partnered with Facing History and Ourselves, one of the world’s most respected educational organizations. FHAO is dedicated to raising students’ awareness of injustice and intolerance. Together WETA and FHAO are creating curriculum materials to help middle and high school teachers use the film and additional primary sources to engage students in the Sharps’ story of sacrifice, rescue, and moral courage. Materials will be available free to schools through PBS’ LearningMedia Services.

Funding is provided by members of The Better Angels Society including Jan and Rick Cohen and Jonathan and Jeannie Lavine; The Starr Foundation; The Threshold Foundation; and donations from individuals.

Defying the Nazis: the Sharps’ War is a co-production of NO LIMITS MEDIA, Inc., and Florentine Films, in association with WETA Washington, D.C. A film by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky. Produced by Ken Burns and Matthew Justus, Ken Burns: Executive Producer. Edited by Erik Angra. Music by Sheldon Mirowitz. Copyright: Farm Pond Pictures, LLC.

Date: September 20, 2016
Time: 6:30 p.m. (Exhibit Opening) and 8 p.m. (Film Screening)
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Dickie Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

An opening reception for the exhibit, A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II, will be held at the John Hay Library on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 6 p.m., followed by a screening of Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War at 8 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library. The exhibition will be on view through December 23, 2016 at the John Hay Library and is open to the public during hours when Special Collections Services are available. Admission is free. Please check the John Hay Library website for detailed information about hours.

Martha Ingham Dickie Sharp

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Martha Ingham Dickie, Pembroke Class of 1926

Ninety-four years ago, in the Fall of 1922, Martha Ingham Dickie entered Pembroke College as a scholarship student. In her four years at Brown, Martha Dickie took up a focused plan of study while participating actively in campus governance, social clubs and athletics. She was, as her yearbook entry noted, “[a] very busy person… and yet … everyone’s friend, especially the lowly and lonely…”

After graduating in May 1926, Martha Dickie went on to work on a graduate degree in social work at Chicago’s Northwestern University, where her studies included a practicum at Hull House, the settlement house project made famous by Jane Addams. But life soon intervened in her professional plans: in 1927, Martha was introduced to a young Harvard law school graduate with a spiritual bent — Waitstill Hastings Sharp, the son of academic Dallas Lore Sharp (Brown 1895). Martha and Waitstill married one year later; Waitstill went on to attend Harvard Divinity School and was ordained as a Unitarian in 1933. Initially assigned to a church in Meadville, Pennsylvania, Waitstill was soon called to shepherd the Unitarian congregation in Wellesley, Massachusetts, in 1937. Martha and her husband took to parish life like fish to water; it gave them a way to employ the caring social and custodial skills that were innate to them both. So perhaps it was natural that when the American Unitarian Association came recruiting for a relief project in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia in 1938, the Sharps were quick to volunteer.

A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II

This fall’s main exhibition in the John Hay Library, A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II, tells the story of these two intrepid people and their humanitarian work as founding members of the Unitarian Service Committee. The exhibition is drawn from personal papers of the Sharps, along with those of USC co-founders Robert Cloutman Dexter (Brown A.B. 1912, A.M. 1917) and his wife Elisabeth Anthony Dexter, and illustrates the efforts of these two couples to administer aid to refugees and others in need across Nazi-occupied Europe under the aegis of the American Unitarian Association and in collaboration with other relief organizations. Papers of the Sharps and the Dexters are held at the Hay Library and are available to interested researchers.

Exhibition website: https://library.brown.edu/create/sharpswar/

Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War

The exhibition aligns with the release of a new film by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky III airing on PBS this fall. Entitled Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War, the film tells the story of the sacrifices made, risks taken, and successes achieved by the Sharps in pursuing humanitarian relief work for the Unitarian Service Committee.

Dates: Exhibit Opening Reception: September 20, 2016; Exhibit: September 20 – December 23, 2016
Times: 6:30 p.m. (Exhibit Opening) and 8 p.m. (Film Screening)
Locations: Exhibit: John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street; Screening: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street

Open House | Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio

Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio

All are invited to tour the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio in the Rockefeller Library during Family Weekend on Saturday, October 22, 2016 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

The new Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, which opened in May of this year, was built to encourage students, faculty, and staff to engage in innovative forms and methods of digital scholarship using facilities that include a video and audio production suite, large format printer, a 3D scanner, and a full-color 3D printer.

3D model of optic neurons

3D model of optic neurons

Students, faculty, and staff have already printed 3D models of optic neurons and the interior of the Sistine Chapel, recorded interviews and podcasts, shot video lectures, and printed original digital art.

During the open house on October 22, several members of the Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship will showcase these technologies, along with several other examples of projects developed in collaboration with Brown faculty that employ such approaches as computational text analysis, data visualization, and GIS.

Come by for a tour and talk and see what libraries have been up to lately! 

3D model of the Sistine Chapel interior

3D model of the Sistine Chapel interior

For more information, see the websites for the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio and the Brown University Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship.

Date: Saturday, October 22, 2016
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Annual Wilmeth Lecture | The Psychology of Magic and the Science of Manipulating Minds

alex_bwOn Monday, October 24 at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, room 001 (lower auditorium), author and magician Alex Stone will deliver the 13th Annual Don Wilmeth Endowed Lectureship in Theatre and Entertainment entitled, “The Psychology of Magic and the Science of Manipulating Minds.”

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the lecture.

Alex Stone

Alex Stone is a renowned journalist, speaker, magician, and former physicist. He is the author of Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks and the Hidden Powers of the Mind—a book about the world of magic and its ties to science. Fooling Houdini was named one of Amazon’s “Ten Best Nonfiction Books of 2012” and has been published in nine countries. Stone’s writing has also appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Harper’s, The New Republic, Discover, Psychology Today, and elsewhere. He lives in New York City.

Lecture Summary

Stone’s talk will show you how to hack the human brain using the principles of magic, illusion, and deception. Through a lively mix of cutting-edge science and jaw-dropping tricks, Stone pulls back the curtain to reveal a host of startling revelations about how the mind works—and why, sometimes, it doesn’t. His enthralling and informative talk offers a wealth of powerful insights into the nature of perception and the hidden forces that shape human behavior, leaving the audience with a new way of looking at the world and at themselves.

The Don Wilmeth Endowed Lectureship was established in honor of Professor Don Wilmeth and his monumental contribution to the study of theatre at Brown. The lectureship supports an annual lecture series on American theatre. Past visiting lecturers have included Laurence Maslon (2005), Jim Steinmeyer (2007), Christopher Bigsby (2008), Laura Linney (2008), Lynn Nottage (2010), Bill Irwin (2011), and Oskar Eustis (2014).

This event is supported by Brown University Library and Friends.

Date: October 24, 2016
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 001, 79 Waterman Street, Providence

Alumni Reunion Forum | The Vietnam War: Our Veterans’ Stories

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Please join the Library for an Alumni Reunion Forum on Saturday, May 28 from 3 – 4:30 p.m. in the Willis Reading Room at the John Hay Library. Professor Beth Taylor, Co-Director of the Nonfiction Writing Program, will moderate a panel of alumni veterans and family who will discuss their memories from the Vietnam War. This event is sponsored by the Brown University Library, Brown Alumni Association, and the Nonfiction Writing Program, Department of English.

Some of them attended Brown with the help of ROTC and they all went to the war before the campus protests. Come hear the surprising stories of Brown’s Vietnam Veterans and join in a discussion with alumni whose lives were changed forever by those difficult times.

The Vietnam Veterans of America will present the University Archives with personal artifacts of John Brooks Sherman ’62 (1st. Lt., U.S. Marine Corps, 1962-1966, d. 1966, Vietnam), recently unearthed in Vietnam. Learn about the newly curated Brown Vietnam Veterans Archive and website — featuring flight jackets, commissioning photos, military documents, and love letters.

Moderator:

Beth Taylor, Co-Director, Nonfiction Writing Program

Panelists:

  • David Taylor ’66 (1st. Lt., U.S. Marine Corps, 1966-1971), Real Estate Developer
  • Barry Kowalski ’66 (1st. Lt., U.S. Marine Corps, 1966-1970), Special Counsel for Civil Rights Division, Department of Justice
  • Elaine Zimmer Davis, widow of Jerry Zimmer ’66 (Capt., U.S. Marine Corps, 1966-1969, MIA, 8-29-69, Vietnam)
  • Augustus A. White, III, ’57, MD, PhD (Capt., Medical Corps, U.S. Army, 1966-1967), Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ellen and Melvin Gordon Distinguished Professor of Medical Education, Harvard Medical School

A corresponding exhibit, also entitled The Vietnam War: Our Veterans’ Stories, will be on display in the Willis Reading Room at the John Hay Library from May 28 – August 19, 2016. The exhibit features photographs, letters, military clothing, and quotations from the Brown Vietnam Veterans Archive to depict how alumni transitioned from Brown to Vietnam and beyond. The Vietnam Veterans Archive preserves the stories of Brown University alumni who served in the military during the Vietnam War through oral histories and personal papers.

Date: Saturday, May 28, 2016
Time: 3 – 4:30 p.m.
Location: Willis Reading Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Commencement Forum | Word/Image/Text: Reading for the Philosophers’ Stone in Atalanta fugiens with Tara Nummedal

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Tara Nummedal, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department

The Library welcomes visitors to a Commencement Forum on Saturday, May 28, 2016 at 11 a.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab and Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio at the Rockefeller Library.

As part of Brown University’s new Digital Publishing Initiative, Professor Tara Nummedal will present on her upcoming publishing project. Project Atalanta will bring a multimedia seventeenth century text to life in digital form. This innovative digital publication will produce a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of Michael Maier’s extraordinary text, Atalanta fugiens (1617/18): an alchemical emblem book that re-casts the myth of Atalanta—the fleet-footed virgin—as a series of fifty emblems. Comprised of text, image, and music, each individual emblem engages sound, sight, and intellect; read together, these emblems serve as an interlocking guide to alchemical theory and the production of the philosophers’ stone.

As a pilot project of the Digital Publishing Initiative, Project Atalanta seeks to bridge the gaps between the readers of today and their seventeenth century counterparts. By transforming the Atalanta fugiens into a dynamic digital object through the collaboration of historians, musicians, rare book curators, linguists, scientists, artists, and other scholars Project Atalanta reflects a dynamic, emergent form of interdisciplinary scholarship. The University Library invites visitors to come and hear about this unique multimedia text, and explore along with Professor Nummedal the implications of reading across time, cultures, and technologies.

Tara Nummedal is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department. She is the author of Alchemy and Authority in the Holy Roman Empire and is currently completing her second book, “The Lion’s Blood: Alchemy, Gender, and Apocalypse in Reformation Germany.” Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and, most recently, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She is Past President of the New England Renaissance Conference and a member of the editorial board of the journal Ambix. She teaches courses in early modern European history and the history of science.

Date: Saturday, May 28, 2016
Time: 11 a.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Events | Carberry Day on Friday the 13th

Josiah Carberry during the Blizzard of 2015, Providence, RI

Professor Josiah S. Carberry

Each Friday the 13th, the Brown University Library celebrates Josiah S. Carberry Day. We invite you to join us for these events on Friday, May 13, 2016:

3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Tours of the John Hay Library
John Hay staff will be available in the Military Collection gallery and the Lincoln and Napoleon rooms on the third floor. View the exhibit curated by Professor Emeritus Don Wilmeth, “Actors and Other Monsters: Graphic Satire As Blood Sport, 1789–1830.” A reception will take place in the foyer.

5 – 6 p.m.
“Bigger Cracks than Carberry’s Pots:  Fracking and Earthquakes”
A talk by Terry Tullis, Professor of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, in the Rockefeller Library Digital Scholarship Lab. Open to the public.

6:30 p.m.
The Carberry Dinner at the Brown Faculty Club, with a cash bar from 6 p.m. 

Buffet dinner with recipes from The Carberry Cookbook. Cost is $45 per person, in advance.  Please make your reservations online at:

http://brown.edu/go/carberry

After dinner, Professor Terry Tullis will condense his afternoon talk.

Event | Online Learning and the MIT Approach with Sanjay Sarma

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Sanjay Sarma

On Monday, May 9, 2016 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Dr. Sanjay Sarma, Dean of Digital Learning at MIT, will give a talk entitled, “Online Learning and the MIT Approach.” This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

MIT launched OpenCourseWare (OCW) 15 years ago, and since then it has reached over 200 million users. Five years ago, it launched MITx, and then edX with Harvard, and it has reached nearly 10 million users with MOOC’s. Dr. Sarma will talk about these advances in digital learning and explain what MIT’s approach is. In particular, he will discuss MIT’s interests in the science of learning and the new initiatives MIT has launched in primary, secondary, tertiary, and professional learning.

Sanjay Sarma is the Fred Fort Flowers (1941) and Daniel Fort Flowers (1941) Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. He is the first Dean of Digital Learning at MIT. He co-founded the Auto-ID Center at MIT and developed many of the key technologies behind the EPC suite of RFID standards now used worldwide. He was also the the founder and CTO of OATSystems, which was acquired by Checkpoint Systems (NYSE: CKP) in 2008. He serves on the boards of GS1, EPCglobal and several startup companies including Senaya and ESSESS. Dr. Sarma received his Bachelors from the Indian Institute of Technology, his Masters from Carnegie Mellon University and his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. Sarma also worked at Schlumberger Oilfield Services in Aberdeen, UK, and at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories in Berkeley, California.  He has authored over 75 academic papers in computational geometry, sensing, RFID, automation and CAD, and is the recipient of numerous awards for teaching and research including the MacVicar Fellowship, the Business Week eBiz Award and Informationweek’s Innovators and Influencers Award. He advises several national governments and global companies.

This event is part of the Teaching and Learning in the Digital Environment lecture series.

Date: Monday, May 9, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Terra Huber on “The Conservation of a 16th Century Papal Bull on Parchment”

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During preservation

During National Preservation Week on Friday, April 29, 2016 from 2 – 3 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Terra Huber, Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, will give a talk entitled, “The Conservation of a 16th Century Papal Bull on Parchment.” This event is free and open to the public.

After preservation

A papal bull is an official letter or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church, named after the bulla, or authenticating lead seal, affixed to the document. Papal bulls are handwritten on parchment, a historical writing surface prepared from animal skin that presents unique challenges to the conservator. This talk will focus on the history, materials, production, and conservation treatment of a papal bull from the collection of the Brown University Library. The Brown University Library’s papal bull is dated to 1580 and was issued by Pope Gregory XIII, the pope responsible for introducing the Gregorian calendar which we use today.

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Terra Huber

Terra Huber has studied and worked in the field of conservation since 2009. She has worked as an Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center since 2015 and has completed internships at the Walters Art Museum, the Newberry Library, the Boston Athenaeum, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Terra earned a Master of Arts with a Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Tyler School of Arts of Temple University. She is a member of the American Institute for Conservation and the Guild of Book Workers.

Date: Friday, April 29, 2016
Time: 2 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence