Event | Abby Smith Rumsey: “Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?”

Abby Smith Rumsey

On Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, writer and historian Abby Smith Rumsey will discuss “Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?” A reception will follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?

Memory technologies from papyrus to print have given humans a unique survival advantage, allowing us to accumulate knowledge. These technologies shape our perception of history, time, and personal and cultural identity. Historian Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory is shaping the future of knowledge and the roles that libraries and archives play in the future of our collective memory.

Abby Smith Rumsey

Abby Smith Rumsey is a writer and historian focusing on the creation, preservation, and use of the cultural record in all media. She has written and lectured widely on digital preservation, online scholarship, the nature of evidence, the changing roles of libraries and archives, intellectual property policies in the digital age, and the impact of new information technologies on perceptions of history and time.

Rumsey served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and has advised universities and their research libraries on strategies to integrate digital information resources into existing collections and services.

For over a decade, Rumsey worked with the Library of Congress’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in development of a national strategy to identify, collect, and preserve digital content of long-term value. She was on the National Science Foundation’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access and was senior writer and editor of the task force’s second-year report, Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet: Ensuring Long- term Access to Digital Information. The Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access. She served on the ACLS Commission on Cyberinfrastructure for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Rumsey served as director of programs at the Council on Library and Information Resources and was responsible for projects that addressed the use and preservation of historical and cultural materials in all genres, formats, and media. She wrote, edited, and commissioned numerous reports on the challenges of migrating our shared intellectual and cultural heritage from paper, film, and audio formats to digital media; and on consequences such organizational disruptions, threats of information loss, and changing conceptions about intellectual property and the value inherent in information.

Prior to that, she managed programs at the Library of Congress relating to preservation of and access to cultural heritage collections. She curated several exhibitions, including the “Treasures of the Library of Congress,” “Living Traditions of Russian Faith: Books and Manuscripts of the Old Believers,” and contributed to the historic display of documents from classified Soviet archives, “Revelations from the Russian Archives.” She worked with former Soviet bloc governments and organizations directing programs to open up access to their libraries and archives.

Abby Smith Rumsey holds a BA from Radcliffe College and MA and PhD degrees in history from Harvard University, where she specialized in Early Modern Russia and intellectual history. She has been a Fulbright Fellow and taught at Harvard and Johns Hopkins Universities.

This event is part of the Library’s ongoing lecture series, “The Future of Scholarly Publishing.” Abby Smith Rumsey’s visit to Brown is co-sponsored by the John Carter Brown Library.

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Event | Matthew Gold and Douglas Armato Discuss “The Future of Scholarly Publishing”

On Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Matthew K. Gold and Douglas Armato will speak as part of the Library’s Mellon-funded “The Future of Scholarly Publishing” series. They will primarily discuss their Mellon Foundation-funded project, Manifold Scholarship, a platform for iterative, networked monographs.

Matthew K. Gold

Matthew K. Gold

Matthew K. Gold is Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he holds teaching appointments in the Ph.D. Program in English, the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies, and the doctoral certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. He serves as Advisor to the Provost for Digital Initiatives, Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, and Director of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab. He edited Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minnesota, 2012) and, with Lauren F. Klein (with whom he is co- editor of the Debates in the Digital Humanities book series), recently co-edited Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016.

His collaborative digital humanities projects include Manifold Scholarship, Commons In A Box, Looking for Whitman, DH Box, and Social Paper. He is Vice President/President-Elect of the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Douglas Armato

Douglas Armato

Douglas Armato is Director of the University of Minnesota Press, where he also acquires books in philosophy, social theory, and digital media and culture. In a thirty-six year career in scholarly publishing, he has also worked at Columbia University Press, Basic Books, Louisiana State University Press, the University of Georgia Press, and the Johns Hopkins University Press. He served two terms on the Board of Directors of the Association of American University Presses and was also that organization’s President in 2005-2006. He was also a member of the steering committees of University Press Content Consortium and the Books at JSTOR initiative. In 2005, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota, he formulated the Mellon Foundation-funded Quadrant Initiative for collaborative scholarly research and publication. He is currently co-PI (with Matthew K. Gold) on a Mellon Foundation Grant to develop Manifold Scholarship, an online platform for networked, iterative scholarship. He has spoken widely on issues of scholarly communication and is often quoted in local and national media stories on scholarly publishing.

Date: Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Event | Omer Bartov Discusses “The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood: Buczacz, Biography of a Town”

Omer Bartov, John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History and Professor of History and Professor of German Studies

On Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, Omer Bartov, John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History and Professor of History and Professor of German Studies at Brown, will present his new book, The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood: Buczacz, Biography of a Town.

A reception will follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood: Buczacz, Biography of a Town

This lecture will discuss how the East Galician town of Buczacz was transformed from a site of coexistence, where Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews had lived side-by-side for centuries, into a site of genocide. Between 1941, when the Germans conquered the region, and 1944, when the Soviets liberated it, the entire Jewish population of Buczacz was murdered by the Nazis, with ample help from local Ukrainians, who then also ethnically cleansed the region of the Polish population. What were the reasons for this instance of communal violence, what were its dynamics, and why has it been erased from the local memory?

Professor Omer Bartov

Born in Israel and educated at Tel Aviv University and St. Antony’s College, Oxford, Omer Bartov’s early research concerned the Nazi indoctrination of the Wehrmacht and the crimes it committed in World War II, analyzed in his books, The Eastern Front, 1941-1945, and Hitler’s Army. He then turned to the links between total war and genocide, discussed in his books Murder in Our Midst, Mirrors of Destruction, and Germany’s War and the Holocaust. Bartov’s interest in representation also led to his study, The “Jew” in Cinema, which examines the recycling of antisemitic stereotypes in film. His monograph, Erased, investigates interethnic relations in the borderlands of Eastern Europe. As a framework for this research, he led a multi-year collaborative project at the Watson Institute, culminating in the co-edited volume, Shatterzone of Empires. Bartov has recently completed a major monograph, The Voice of Your Brother’s Blood: Buczacz, Biography of a Town.

This event is part of the Library’s lecture series, “The Holocaust: History and Aftermath.”

Date: Wednesday, April 12, 2017
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Events | DEFYING THE NAZIS: THE SHARPS’ WAR – Discussions with Artemis Joukowsky

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Spend two evenings with author Artemis Joukowsky III P’14, P’16, who tells the incredible story of his grandparents, Martha Ingham Dickie (Brown 1926) and Rev. Waitstill Hastings Sharp in his new book, Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War (Beacon Press, 2016), also a film by Ken Burns of the same name.

On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. in the Special Collections Reading Room of the John Hay Library, Artemis Joukowsky and Holly Snyder, Ph.D., Curator of American Historical Collections and North American History Librarian, will discuss how Artemis researched this story, collaborated with Ken Burns and others to develop the film project, and ultimately published a companion book.

On Tuesday, February 28, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. in the Special Collections Reading Room of the John Hay Library, we will officially close the exhibit related to the book and film, A Hymn for the Brave: The Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II. During the discussion, Artemis’ parents Martha Sharp Joukowsky, PhD ’58, PHB’82 hon., LHD’85 hon., P’87, GP’13, GP’14, GP’16, GP’17 and Artie Joukowsky, Jr. ’55, LLD’85 hon., P87, GP’13, GP’14, GP’16, GP’17 will join in via WebEx.

A reception and book-signing will follow the discussions on both nights. Books will be available for sale from the Brown Bookstore. These events are free and open to the public.

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

The Sharps, who helped to found the Unitarian Service Committee in the midst of World War II, personally oversaw USC efforts to rescue refugees from dire situations under Nazi occupation in Czechoslovakia and France and helped to save hundreds of lives across Europe. Defying the Nazis supplements the PBS documentary of the same name, co-produced by Joukowsky with Ken Burns, and which premiered on PBS stations in September 2016. Joukowsky’s book fleshes out the Sharps’ story in ways that simply could not be done within the boundaries of a 90 minute film.

Artemis has been researching the wartime efforts of his grandparents since he was a teenager, and over the past four decades has compiled important documentation about their work with refugees and its ultimate costs on their marriage and family. This is a story of simple people finding strength they had no idea they possessed. It is a story of individuals standing up to unthinkable evil. It is a story that contains both the twists and turns of a classic spy thriller, as well as the heartbreaks and triumphs of the most compelling drama. And, above all, Defying the Nazis is a tragic love story—a story of what one man and one woman could accomplish together, and how those very achievements pulled them apart.

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Children’s Journey to Freedom : A Report by Martha Sharp of the First Children’s Emigration Project, Unitarian Service Committee, 1941

Dates: Tuesday, February 21 and Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m., both nights
Location: Special Collections Reading Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Nathaniel Philbrick to Receive Library’s Harris Collection Literary Award

Nathaniel Philbrick

On Thursday, March 2, 2017 at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, the Brown University Library and Friends of the Library will present the Harris Collection Literary Award to renowned author and historian, Nathaniel Philbrick ’78, P’08. A brief awards ceremony will kick off the event, followed by an interview with Philbrick, led by Associate Professor of History, Linford Fisher. A reception will follow.

#HarrisAward

Mr. Philbrick is happy to sign books brought to the event at the reception following the interview program. (Books will not be sold at the event.)

Nathaniel Philbrick

Nathaniel Philbrick grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he attended Linden Elementary School and Taylor Allderdice High School. He earned a BA in English from Brown University and an MA in America Literature from Duke University, where he was a James B. Duke Fellow. He was Brown University’s first Intercollegiate All-American sailor in 1978, the same year he won the Sunfish North Americans in Barrington, RI. After working as an editor at Sailing World magazine, he wrote and edited several books about sailing, including The Passionate Sailor, Second Wind, and Yaahting, A Parody.

In 1986, Philbrick moved to Nantucket with his wife Melissa and their two children. In 1994, he published his first book about the island’s history, Away Off Shore, followed by a study of the Nantucket’s native legacy titled Abram’s Eyes. He is the founding director of the Egan Maritime Institute and a research fellow at the Nantucket Historical Association.

In 2000, he published the New York Times bestseller, In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the National Book Award for nonfiction, followed by Sea of Glory, winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize and the Albion-Monroe Award from the National Maritime Historical Society, and Mayflower, finalist for both the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in History and the Los Angeles Times Book Award and winner of the Massachusetts Book Award for nonfiction. His writing has also appeared in Vanity Fair, the New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and The Boston Globe. He has appeared on the Today Show, the Morning Show, Dateline, PBS’s American Experience, CSPAN, and NPR.

Linford D. Fisher

Professor Fisher grew up in the rolling hills of southeastern Pennsylvania. He received his doctorate from Harvard University in 2008. In 2008-2009 he was an Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University–South Bend. He joined the Department of History at Brown in the summer of 2009. Professor Fisher’s research and teaching relate primarily to the cultural and religious history of colonial America and the Atlantic world, including Native Americans, religion, material culture, and Indian and African slavery and servitude.

Caleb Fiske Harris Collection Literary Award

The Caleb Fiske Harris Collection Literary Award recognizes leaders in the creative community for their outstanding contributions to American literature. Inspired by the love of the arts demonstrated by Caleb Fiske Harris, Brown class of 1838, during his lifetime, the award celebrates the influence of literature in popular culture. Please visit the Harris Collection Literary Award website for more information about this exciting event, the Harris Collection Literary Award, and past recipients, George RR Martin and Tom Doherty.

Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays

The Brown University Library’s Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays is comprised of American and Canadian poetry, plays, and vocal music dating from 1609 to the present. It is perhaps the largest and most comprehensive collection of its kind in any research library. The extensive holdings include the works of most American and Canadian poets and playwrights from the 18th century to the present day — from Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe to many less well-known artists.

This event is brought to campus by the Friends of the Brown University Library.

#HarrisAward

Date: Thursday, March 2, 2017
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Salomon Center for Teaching and Learning, De Ciccio Family Auditorium

Event | The Holocaust and Human Behavior: Facing History to Build the Future with Roger Brooks

On Friday, March 17, 2017 at noon in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, Roger Brooks, President and CEO of Facing History and Ourselves, will give a talk as part of the Library’s lecture series, The Holocaust: History and Aftermath. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

The Holocaust and Human Behavior: Facing History to Build the Future

Theologian and survivor David Weiss Halivni argues that the Holocaust must forever remain an event without an explanation. “Why did the Shoah happen?” he argues, is an affront to God, and any answer is “a justification that almost smacks of participation.” Still, 40 years ago Facing History and Ourselves created a curriculum in Holocaust education designed to make meaning of the events, through rigorous study of mass murder, its causes, and the society that produced it; and through carefully honing students’ historical perspective. The special insight was that deep historical study, combined with careful reflection on identity and belonging, could help students nurture their own ongoing sense of responsibility to society. These organizational insights are found in a newly revised resource volume, Holocaust and Human Behavior, which undergirds a broader arc for understanding contemporary racism, bigotry, and prejudice upon on understanding antisemitism and the Holocaust.

Roger Brooks

Renowned educator, scholar, and leader, Roger Brooks joined Facing History in late 2014, following a long and distinguished tenure at Connecticut College as the Elie Wiesel Professor in the Department of Religious Studies (1991-2014). He also served as Associate Dean of the Faculty (2003-2007) and Dean of the Faculty and Chief Academic Officer (2007-2014). He was named Elie Wiesel Professor Emeritus of Judaic Studies at the College in 2015.

Roger is known for his leadership in curricular reform designed to prepare for and respond to the changing landscape of higher education. He developed and implemented new policies for hiring and retention of diverse faculty at Connecticut College, including systematic outreach to graduate schools and individualized retention plans. He also has a longstanding partnership with the Holocaust Education Foundation, which prepares collegiate faculty to teach curriculum related to the Holocaust and genocide. Roger is an expert in early rabbinic culture, particularly in the third- through fifth-century tax codes that emphasized the relationships between incipient rabbinic culture, the Jews, their God, and Roman Imperial power. He is the author or editor of six books and numerous articles, including several volumes of translation and commentary on foundational Jewish texts.

Date: Friday, March 17, 2017
Times: 12 – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Talk and Workshop | Zines and Radical Librarianship with Jenna Freedman

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 from 3:30 – 5 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Jenna Freedman, Associate Director of Communications and Zine Librarian at Barnard College, will give a talk on zines and zine history, radical librarianship, zinemaking, and queering publishing. This event is free and open to the public.

Jenna Freedman’s research and practice center on zines and activist librarianship. She writes and presents on these and other topics and was a co-founder of the Radical Reference Project and #critlib.

From 7 – 10 p.m. on February 2, Jenna and Malana Krongelb ’17, the Sarah Doyle zine archivist, will lead a workshop about zinemaking as a form of “queering publishing” and creating radical, accessible, authentic platforms.

Craft supplies will be provided, but feel free to bring your own!

The day’s events are part of the festivities surrounding the opening of the Sarah Doyle Center’s Zine Collection, which has been curated and catalogued by Malana Krongelb.

Sponsored by Brown LGBTQ+ Center, Brown University Library, Pembroke Center, Department of American Studies, Sarah Doyle Women’s Center, and Dean of the College.

Date: Thursday, February 2, 2017
Times: 3:30 – 5 p.m. (talk) and 7 – 10 p.m. (workshop)
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab (talk) and Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio (workshop), John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Works from Architectures of Islam & Architectures and Urbanism of Africa

The architecture models displayed in the Rockefeller Library’s Finn Reading Room cases were created by students in Professor Sheila Bonde’s lecture course “Architectures of Islam” and in Professor Itohan Osayimwese’s lecture course, “Architecture and Urbanism of Africa.”

Professor Bonde’s class looked at case studies of Islamic architecture spanning fourteen centuries and three continents, while Professor Osayimwese’s class looked at the built environments of African from earliest times to the present.

Students were asked to create a model based on a building from the Islamic world or from the African world.

Dates: January 6 – May 31, 2017
TimeRockefeller Library Hours
Location: Finn Reading Room Cases, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Dissertation Writing Retreat January 9-13 from the Writing Center, Graduate School and University Library (Deadline 12/28)

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Advanced PhD students are invited to apply now to participate in a Dissertation Writing Retreat in January 2017. The writing-intensive retreat, to be held January 9-13, will provide 16 participants with space, time and encouragement to make progress on their dissertations. Stacy Kastner, Associate Director of the Writing Center, will lead the retreat, which pools the resources and support of the Graduate School, Sheridan Center and Libraries.

The deadline for submitting the electronic form is Wednesday, December 28, 2016. See details, including eligibility, here.

During the retreat, students will meet in the morning to set writing goals over coffee and tea, spend two hours writing, and then break for an informal lunch talk peppered with energizing advice and anecdotes about how to successfully navigate the dissertation writing process. In the afternoon, they will spend another three hours writing, with one-on-one support available from Writing Associates and Research Librarians. The group will close the day at 4 p.m., regrouping to check-in about writing goals and to celebrate progress made.

This offering is a response to the Graduate Student Council’s request for increased writing support for graduate students.

EVENT | Pizza Nights

 

 

84a24e_0631a147db134c92bd8a6701acc3ec2c-jpg_srz_925_616_85_22_0-50_1-20_0Who wants some pizza?

Every semester the Library hosts two nights of pizza to fortify your studying. The first (Tuesday) night will be in the Rock. The next night (Wednesday) there will be pizza in Friedman Study Center at the SciLi. Students that enjoy studying in a library as well as eating pizza are encouraged to attend.

Schedule:
Tuesday, December 13  |  9 p.m.  | Rockefeller Library Lobby
Wednesday, December 14  |  9 p.m.  |  Friedman Study Center (SciLi)

Pizza nights are sponsored by the Library, Campus Life, and an ever true Brown Family.

Good luck with exams!

#pizzanights