Event | Sylvia Brown: Grappling with Legacy

On Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, Sylvia Brown will give a talk entitled, “Grappling with Legacy.” The talk is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow as well as a book sale and signing.

Grappling with Legacy: Rhode Island’s Brown Family and the American Philanthropic Impulse

In 2016, Americans gave $41 billion to institutions of higher education.The concept of a university as an agent of social change has become an intrinsic part of our ethos. It started right here in the early 19th century when Nicholas Brown II poured money into Brown University to give young men the moral compass they needed to navigate the era’s stormy seas. Yet less than a century later, a speaker at the inaugural symposium of the University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice declared, “There were no good Browns.” Sylvia Brown’s book, Grappling with Legacy: Rhode Island’s Brown Family and the American Philanthropic Impulse, was born of these two starkly opposed perspectives and tells the story of America’s evolving attitudes towards charitable giving.

Sylvia Brown

The eldest of the 11th generation of the Browns of Rhode Island, Sylvia Brown was attracted to development economics from an early age. Following her BS and MA degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, she pursued a professional career in international development, from Wall Street to the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees. For the past decade, she has worked with donors on their personal strategy and with non-profits looking to improve their sustainability and board governance practices. Her personal philanthropy focuses on both her family’s longstanding interest in history and heritage (including Brown University) and on the impact investment sector in Rhode Island, where she is a director of the Social Enterprise Greenhouse. In 2015, she launched Uplifting Journeys, an immersive donor education program to empower anyone, anywhere, to give more thoughtfully and strategically.

Date: Tuesday, February 20, 2018
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, Second Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Lincoln Recordó en America Latina

LINCOLN RECORDÓ EN AMERICA LATINA

Selected Items on View at the John Hay Library:

“Canción a Abraham Lincoln” Lady’s Fan, c. 1865
Havana, Cuba
Brown University Library, Special Collections

Latin Americans observed, mourned and commemorated Abraham Lincoln’s life and legacy in a number of ways. Argentinians named a city in Buenos Aires Province for him. Statues of Lincoln can be found in Mexico, Cuba and Ecuador. Avenida Abraham Lincoln is a main thoroughfare in the city of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Shown here is a more personal object: a lady’s fan, thought to have been produced in Havana. It commemorates Lincoln’s life and assassination in both English and Spanish.

Vida de Abran Lincoln, décimo sesto presidente de los Estados Unidos
Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (1811–1888)
Nueva York, Estados Unidos: D. Appleton y Ca., 1866
Brown University Library, Special Collections

In May 1865, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento arrived in New York to take up his post as minister plenipotentiary to the United States from the newly reunified Argentine Republic. Arriving from a country in triumph to a country in deep mourning, Sarmiento heard a great deal and thought deeply about Lincoln, whose ideas about government he found engaging and with whom he felt he would have had much in common. Before the year was out, he had written a full length biography of the assassinated leader, whom he had never met, publishing it in his native Spanish in New York. “In the life of Lincoln,” Sarmiento wrote, “we find commonalities of existence in both Americas, and in the facts relating thereto must deduce lessons and useful warnings for our own government.”  The copy shown here was originally presented by Sarmiento, hot off the press, to the Library of Congress.

Dates: January February 6 – 28, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Annual Address of the Carriers & Newsmen of the N.Y. Herald, 1851

 

Annual Address of the Carriers & Newsmen of the New York Herald:  On the Opening of the Year 1851

Carriers’ Addresses were published by newspapers and local newsboys delivered these greetings in verse each New Year’s Day to customers who understood that a tip was expected.  Lasting for more than two centuries in the United States, the custom originated in England and was introduced during colonial times.

The poems, often anonymous, describe the events of the past year, locally, regionally, and nationally, and end with a request for a gratuity for the faithful carrier. Often the poem referred to the carrier’s diligence and hardships during winter weather. Illustrated with wood-engravings and decorative borders, carriers’ addresses are distinctive examples of popular publishing in nineteenth century America.

Dates: January 5 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | San Francisco General Hospital Pillowcase

From the Scott O’Hara Papers: SFGH Pillowcase

Scott O’Hara (1961–1998) was a sex radical, porn star, writer and publisher. Between 1983 and 1993, he performed in over twenty gay and bisexual adult films.  He also edited and published the quarterly sex-positive journal Steam and the short-lived cultural magazine Wilde.

O’Hara was hospitalized at San Francisco General Hospital with AIDS-related lymphoma in February 1998. He chose to leave the hospital on the afternoon of February 18, and he died at home that evening. He was thirty-six years old.

San Francisco General Hospital was at the forefront of the AIDS crisis. In January 1983, the hospital opened the first outpatient AIDS clinic, followed later that year by the first dedicated AIDS ward in the United States. The hospital became known for the “San Francisco model” of care, an approach to treatment that emphasized compassion and respect, centralized health and social services, and collaboration with community partners.

The pillowcase will be on view in recognition of World AIDS Day.

Dates: December 1 – 21, 2017
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Dancy Box by Caitlín R. Kiernan & Kathryn A. Pollnac

The Brown University Library recently acquired the papers of award-winning science fiction and dark fantasy writer Caitlin R. Kiernan.

“In April 2011, I wrote a story featuring my recurring character Dancy Flammarion. The story was titled “Bus Fair,” and it concerns Dancy having to play a riddle game with a werewolf to get back a cigar box containing her most precious possessions. The story became the basis for the first issue of Alabaster, the graphic novel series I scripted for Dark Horse Comics between 2011 and 2015.

In October and November of 2010, after I’d gotten the idea for “Bus Fair,” Kathryn and I created Dancy’s cigar box, because sometimes we do things like that. To pay bills, we auctioned it on eBay, where it brought a very respectable $785 from a longtime fan from Virginia. In July 2017, the fan offered to return the box to me, so that it could be kept with my papers at the John Hay Library. The New Testament in the box was donated by another fan (it had been her mother’s), and the cigar box itself was given to us by Kathryn’s cousin.”  —Caitlín R. Kiernan

The Dancy Box is currently on view.

Dates: November 3 – November 30, 2017
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

 

Event | A Conversation about Stephen Mopope, Kiowa Artist

Mopope, Stephen, “Sun prayer” (1931). Stephen Mopope paintings of seven Native American subjects. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library.

On Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 2 p.m., the Library will host a talk with Kiowa elder Vanessa Paukeigope Jennings, granddaughter of Stephen Mopope (1898-1974), about her grandfather’s life and work. Seven original paintings by Stephen Mopope held in the collections of the Brown University Library will be on display for this event.

The talk will take place in the Lownes Room on the second floor of the John Hay Library. A reception will follow in the Hay Lobby.

Date: October 25, 2017
Time: 2 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, Second Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street

Related event:

On Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. in room 015 at 85 Waterman Street, the Haffenreffer Museum will host a talk with Vanessa Jennings about her own work as an artist and designer in preserving Kiowa cultural traditions.

Event | Dante in Real Time

On Monday, December 4, 2017 at 12 p.m., the Brown University Library and the Program in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (REMS), as part of the Journeys to the Early Modern World in Brown’s Libraries fall series, will present an hour-long workshop, “Dante in Real Time,” designed to introduce undergraduates to the extraordinary possibilities for undertaking engaged research among our special collections.

Dante’s Divine Comedy recounts the poet’s journey through the afterlife and back. From hybrid beasts and fearsome devils to friends and foes, Dante’s world has inspired generations of readers to envision what lay beyond the known world.

In this hands-on workshop, Christopher Geissler, Director of the John Hay Library, and Zoe Langer, 2017 Hay Interdisciplinary Fellow, will view different responses to Dante’s poem, including sixteenth-century maps of Hell and illustrations by Gustave Doré. The Chambers Dante Collection allows us to experience Dante’s poem as its readers encountered it through the centuries and to see how REMS students, working closely with literature, languages, and book illustration, can discover remarkable questions lurking in very old books.

“Dante in Real Time” will take place at 12 p.m. in the Bopp Seminar Room on the third floor of the John Hay Library. A short reception will follow.

Date: Monday, December 4, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Bopp Seminar Room, Third Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street

Exhibit | Victorious Secret by Angela Lorenz ’87, P’18

Victorious Secret: The “Bikini Girls” are Winning the Pentathlon on view at the Rockefeller Library, from August 31 – November 20, 2017

Surprise! The nearly two-thousand-year-old mosaics from Villa Romana del Casale  in Sicily, known simply as the “bikini girls,” are really female athletes from prestigious Roman families. Brown University is the tenth venue for this traveling suite of triptychs, made of buttons and hairpins, which sets the record straight on women in sports.

Meet artist Angela Lorenz, class of 1987, P’18 to learn about her visual arts project and the impact of study abroad on Friday, October 13, 2017, at 4 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library.

Dates: August 31 – November 20, 2017
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Scenes from Cuba’s War of Independence, 1895–1898

Chocolates E. Juncosa Advertising Cards
Scenes from Cuba’s War of Independence,1895–1898.

These advertising cards for the firm Chocolate E. Juncosa, in Barcelona, depict scenes from Cuba’s War of Independence, 1895–1898. Founded in 1835, the company offered cocoa and sugar of the finest quality. This set contains 36 numbered chromolithography cards with color illustrations and caption titles. The reverse of each card contains text advertisement for the company.

Dates: October 5 – October 31, 2017
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Announcement | Curator Li Wang Interviewed by China Library Weekly

During the recent 2017 Beijing International Book Fair–the second largest book fair in the world–Dr. Li Wang, Curator of Brown’s East Asian Collection, was interviewed by China Library Weekly, the only library newspaper published in China. Dr. Wang spoke about Brown University Library as well as his professional activities and perspectives. In the special issue, dated August 25, 2017, a large picture of Brown’s John Hay Library was presented on the newspaper’s front page and a full internal page featured Wang and the interview, entitled: “Librarian Should be an Envoy of Cross-Cultural Exchange.”

Based on his recent study of the mission and vision statements that reflect the new strategies of knowledge services in North American academic research libraries, Wang briefly summarized his ideas on the relationship between libraries and teaching and research at universities. He stressed that, aligning with the educational missions and with the teaching and research goals of their home universities, libraries should further redefine themselves, assume a new role as an academic partner, and engage more actively in knowledge innovation and the research process. That is just what Brown University Library proclaims in its mission statement: “Partnering with students, faculty, staff, and members of the global scholarly community, we foster and guide the creation, acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of knowledge at Brown and beyond in a spirit of free and open inquiry.”

In terms of promoting cross-cultural exchange, Wang also shared his experience in recent years, especially through exhibitions, presentations, travel reports, and other activities in this effort. Wang says, ”The librarian should not only be a manager and educator of scholarly resources. We, as scholars of Chinese studies, should also become an envoy of cross-cultural exchange, creating a genial cultural ambience so as to facilitate cultural exchange and understanding in a global context.”

Click here to read the article in Chinese, or read the translation below (translated by Yanqing Shen ’18).

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