Events | Love Data Week 2020

What is Love Data Week?

Love Data Week is an international celebration of data, aiming to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services.

#LoveData20

Join us and register for Brown’s Inaugural Love Data Week February 10 – 14, 2020!

Brown’s Love Data Week is sponsored by the Office of Vice President for Research (OVPR) and the University Library. 

What is the theme for 2020?

The theme of Love Data Week 2020 is get to know the data specialists at your institution, the kinds of work they do, and the data and associated issues with which these data specialists engage.

Who should I contact to learn more?

To participate or get more information, email data_management@brown.edu.

Love Data Week Events:

Monday, February 10

Data Carpentry Workshop

  • Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL), Room 135, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street
  • 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Kick off Love Data Week by learning data organization and cleaning skills. The University Library is holding a Data Carpentry workshop on Tidy data, OpenRefine, and GitHub led by certified instructors at Brown, Ashely Champagne and Kelsey Sawyer. Check out the lessons online. Brown is a member of the The Carpentries, a not-for-profit, that trains instructors to teach faculty and students foundational coding, and data science skills to researchers.

Nerd Nite RI: Data Slam Edition

  • The Underground, Stephen Robert 62′ Campus Center, 75 Waterman Street
  • 7 – 9 p.m.

Nerd Nite is a monthly event held around the globe during which experts give fun-yet-informative presentations on a variety of topics. We are excited to collaborate with Nerd Nite RI for Nerd Nite RI: Data Slam Edition! Bar food and drinks provided.

Tuesday, February 11

Movie Night

  • Friedman Auditorium, Metcalf Research Building, 190 Thayer Street
  • 7 pm

In collaboration with the Brown University Film Forum (BUFF), join us for a movie night all about data! Snacks provided.

Wednesday, February 12

Leveraging Big Data to Improve the Public’s Health

  • Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL) Room 135, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street
  • 12 – 1:30 p.m.

Join us as Professor Brandon Marshall and his research group hold a panel on the ways that open access to data and data sharing have impacted their work in epidemiology and public health. Pizza lunch provided.

Thursday, February 13

Data Bytes

  • Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, 1st Floor Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street
  • 12 – 1:30 p.m.

With respect to this year’s theme, we are proud to host “Data Bytes,” an event where data specialists offer “byte”-sized presentations on who they are, what they do, and the data with which they engage. Data specialists include representatives from the Data Science Initiative, CIS Data Science Practice Group and Center for Computation & Visualization, Center for Digital Scholarship, Office of Research Integrity, Office of General Counsel, the Multimedia Lab, the Environmental and Remote Technologies Lab, and Advance CTR and Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics. Presentations will be followed by an informal opportunity to meet your data specialists. Kabob and Curry “bytes” provided.

Event | The Evolving Image of Shaker Life with Rob Emlen

On Tuesday, February 11, 2020 at 4 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, Rob Emlen will discuss his newly-published book Imagining the Shakers, based in part on research in the Hay’s Special Collections.

The Evolving Image of Shaker Life

In the half century between 1830 and 1880, the American public encountered the first visual images of this country’s oldest and largest communal religious society. Published as newspaper and magazine illustrations or as separate engravings and lithographs meant to be framed and displayed, these prints reveal the changing ways in which Americans imagined the radically nonconformist Shakers, evolving from suspicion and ridicule to acceptance as a valued part of the cultural landscape of the nation.

Rob Emlen

Rob Emlen is a Visiting Scholar in American Studies at Brown University and a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society. He recently retired as university curator and senior lecturer in American Studies at Brown, and as a part-time faculty member in the Theory and History of Art and Design at the Rhode Island School of Design. During his 34 years at Brown he conducted much of the research for his book Imagining the Shakers in the collections of the John Hay Library.

Date: Tuesday, February 11, 2020
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

To request special services, accommodations, or assistance for this event, please contact Jennifer Braga at Jennifer_Braga@brown.edu or (401) 863-6913 as far in advance of the event as possible. Thank you.

Workshop | Viewing Topography Across the Globe

The John Hay Library is pleased to be hosting the second session of the “Viewing Topography Across the Globe” workshop, taking place on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 from 2 – 4 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library.

Please RSVP here to attend.

Session details:

“Viewing the Minassian Collection” with Shahzad Bashir (Aga Khan Professor of Islam and the Humanities, Brown University) and Holly Shaffer (Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture, Brown University), and graduate students in Tracing Translations (HMAN 2400R)

“Viewing the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection” with Peter Harrington (Curator of the Military Collection, John Hay Library)

This workshop is sponsored by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, the John Carter Brown Library, the John Hay Library, and the Lewis Walpole Library; it is part of the programming for the Collaborative Humanities course, Tracing Translations: Artistic Migrations and Reinventions in the Early Modern World, and is part of a series on topography organized by the Lewis Walpole Library at Yale University.

The session will be followed by tea and other light refreshments in the lobby of the John Hay Library.

More information on the day-long workshop

Date: Wednesday, December 11, 2019
Time: 2 – 4 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

More information on the entire workshop

Exhibit | Paul Revere’s Buried with Him by Baptism, c.1770s

BUL Special Collections, Drowne Collection

Thought to be designed and engraved by Revere, this print depicts the baptism of Christ, by full immersion.  John the Baptist is shown holding Jesus in the Jordan River.  Interpreted as the 12 Apostles watch from the bank while two pairs of angels on clouds flank the top corners.  A sun with mirrored Hebrew lettering (Tetragrammaton) from which two rays of light emanate, a dove on left and on right the words “This is my beloved Son –hear ye him”, or scripture Luke 9:35 from the Christian Holy Bible.

There are 5 known original prints of this plate.  Found inside a medical book at Brown University in 2012, the rare illustration was part of a donation by physician Solomon Drowne, Brown class of 1773.  Among the surviving engravings, paper and sheet size vary; the Brown University Library copy on laid paper demonstrates the plate print slightly askew.   

Exhibit Dates: December 5, 2019 – January 31, 2020
Exhibit TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Exhibit Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Scott Rettberg on Electronic Literature: Threads of Practice and Literary Genre in Digital Writing

On Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 3:30 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Scott Rettburg, Professor of Digital Culture in the department of linguistic, literary, and aesthetic studies at the University of Bergen, Norway, will give a talk entitled, “Electronic Literature: Threads of Practice and Literary Genre in Digital Writing.” The talk is free and open to the public.

Electronic Literature

In the talk, Professor Rettberg will discuss his new book, Electronic Literature, in which he places the most significant genres of electronic literature in historical, technological, and cultural contexts. These include combinatory poetics, hypertext fiction, interactive fiction (and other game-based digital literary work), kinetic and interactive poetry, and networked writing based on our collective experience of the Internet. He argues that electronic literature demands to be read both through the lens of experimental literary practices dating back to the early twentieth century and through the specificities of the technology and software used to produce the work.

Rettberg will give a brief presentation of the methods and themes of the book, which will be followed by a discussion between Rettberg and Cayley.

Scott Rettberg

Scott Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture in the department of linguistic, literary, and aesthetic studies at the University of Bergen, Norway. Rettberg is the author or coauthor of novel-length works of electronic literature, combinatory poetry, and films including The Unknown, Kind of Blue, Implementation, Frequency, The Catastrophe Trilogy, Three Rails Live, Toxi•City, Hearts and Minds: The Interrogations Project and others. His creative work has been exhibited both online and at art venues including the Venice Biennale, Inova Gallery, Rom 8, the Chemical Heritage Foundation Museum, Palazzo dell Arti Napoli and elsewhere.  Rettberg is the author of Electronic Literature (Polity, 2019), the first comprehensive study of the histories and genres of electronic literature and winner of the 2019 N. Katherine Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature.

Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019
Time: 3:30 p.m.
LocationPatrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Collecting with Distinction: Faculty Insights into Recent Acquisitions

Peruse the gallery and discover what is new and unique about Special Collections at the Hay Library.  Explore recent acquisitions from the 14th century to the present through the lens of renowned Brown faculty, and gain insight into the place where the past, present and individual connect.

Opening reception:  Friday, November 22nd, 4-6 PM

Dates: November 22, 2019 – February 14, 2020
Time: John Hay Library Hours
Location: Exhibition Gallery, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Thanksgiving-Day, November 24, 1864, United We Stand

Harper’s Weekly, December 1864; Brown University Library, Special Collections

Created by famous political cartoonist Thomas Nast, these eight vignettes depict a “state of the Union” featuring President Abraham Lincoln during his reelection year. Each rendering touches on a significant factor during the Civil War, which was in its fourth year and with no clear victor at the time. The double-page image, published in Harper’s Weekly in December 1864, reflects the artist’s more illustrative work. Nast is also credited with crafting the modern American representation of Santa Claus during the course of his time at the magazine.

Exhibit Dates: November 1 – 30, 2019
Exhibit TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Exhibit Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Authors in the Archives with Lauren Russell and Megan Milks

Join the Brown University Library for an unforgettable night of poetry, fiction, and discussion of how library and archival research is essential to creative and literary endeavors. Lauren Russell and Megan Milks will both read from their works, followed by a discussion led by librarians and archivists about how they are using primary sources. A Q&A period will conclude the presentation.

The first event in the Authors in the Archives series, this talk will take place on Monday, October 28, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in the Willis Reading Room of the John Hay Library.

Free and open to the public. A light reception will follow the talk.

Lauren Russell

Lauren Russell headshot
Lauren Russell

Lauren Russell is the author of What’s Hanging on the Hush (Ahsahta Press, 2017) and Descent, a winner of the 2019 Tarpaulin Sky Book Awards and a finalist for the National Poetry Series, forthcoming from Tarpaulin Sky Press in 2020. A 2017 NEA Creative Writing Fellow in Poetry, she has also received fellowships and residencies from Cave Canem, The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, VIDA/The Home School, the Rose O’Neill Literary House, the Millay Colony, and City of Asylum/Passa Porta. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazineboundary 2, the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day,  and Bettering American Poetry 2015, among others. She is assistant director of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh.

Megan Milks

Megan Milks reading from a book at a microphone
Megan Milks

Megan Milks is the recipient of the 2019 Lotos Foundation Prize in Fiction Writing. Their first book, Kill Marguerite and Other Stories, won the 2015 Devil’s Kitchen Reading Award in Fiction and was named a Lambda Literary Award finalist. They have also published four chapbooks, most recently Kicking the Baby and The Feels, an exploration of fan fiction and affect. Their critical writing, for which they won a 2014 Critical Hit Award from Electric Lit, has been published in 4ColumnsLos Angeles Book Review, and The New Inquiry, among other venues. Their work as editor includes The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing, 2011-2013 (Northwestern UP, 2015) and Asexualities: Feminist and Queer Perspectives (Routledge, 2014); currently, they edit the Fiction section of The Account.

Authors in the Archives

The Authors in the Archives series features notable writers whose work is brought to fruition through their creative and sagacious use of primary source materials.

Accessibility

To request special services, accommodations, or assistance for this event, please contact Jennifer Braga at Jennifer_Braga@brown.edu or (401) 863-6913 as far in advance of the event as possible. Thank you.

Date: Monday, October 28, 2019
Time: 6:30 p.m.
LocationWillis Reading Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Exploring the Digital China 2019 with Li Wang, PhD

Li Wang, Ph.D.

On Wednesday, October 23, 2019 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Dr. Li Wang, Curator of the East Asian Collection, will give a talk, “Exploring the Digital China 2019.” This event is free and open to the public. Coffee and cookies will be served.

This new visual report will focus on Dr. Wang’s professional trip this summer in China, where he attended several conferences, Beijing International Book Fair, and other events. During this period, he delivered two presentations at the International Conference on Digital Publishing and Digital Libraries and the Sino-American Academic Library Forum on Collaboration and Development. The first presentation, entitled “Digital Scholarship at Brown (Continuance): Knowledge Innovation and Research Engagement in North American University Libraries,” is a follow-up chapter of his award-winning paper on “Digital Scholarship at Brown” from 2014. The second is on American Sinologist Charles S. Gardner and the Chinese collection at Brown University, which won the first prize for papers at the Sino-American Library Forum.

2019 CDPDL in Changchun, China

In his talk, Dr. Wang will scan recent trends in digital publishing, knowledge innovation and library services developed in China and other places in the world. He will also share pictures, stories and thoughts on this fruitful journey, including cultural tours of the Russian style Gogol Bookstore, the wonderful Heaven Lake on the China-North Korea border, and the Inner Mongolian prairie in north China, and much more.

The Heaven Lake (elevation of 7,812 ft.) in Changbai Mountain, China

Date: Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Time: 12 – 1 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | The Last Will of Walt Whitman

Camden, New Jersey: June 29, 1888
Brown University Library, Special Collections

In June of 1888, celebrated American poet Walt Whitman suffered a stroke, which left him partially paralyzed. Fearful he would not recover, Whitman drafted this will, which leaves the majority of his money to his sisters, his property to his brother, and names three literary executors. Whitman would survive for four more years, and go on to publish four more works, including his “Deathbed Edition” of Leaves of Grass.

This manuscript is just one of several thousand books and manuscripts recently presented to the library by Daniel G. Siegel ’57.

Exhibit Dates: October 4 – 31, 2019
Exhibit TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Exhibit Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence