Dissertation Writing Retreat January 9-13 from the Writing Center, Graduate School and University Library (Deadline 12/28)

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Advanced PhD students are invited to apply now to participate in a Dissertation Writing Retreat in January 2017. The writing-intensive retreat, to be held January 9-13, will provide 16 participants with space, time and encouragement to make progress on their dissertations. Stacy Kastner, Associate Director of the Writing Center, will lead the retreat, which pools the resources and support of the Graduate School, Sheridan Center and Libraries.

The deadline for submitting the electronic form is Wednesday, December 28, 2016. See details, including eligibility, here.

During the retreat, students will meet in the morning to set writing goals over coffee and tea, spend two hours writing, and then break for an informal lunch talk peppered with energizing advice and anecdotes about how to successfully navigate the dissertation writing process. In the afternoon, they will spend another three hours writing, with one-on-one support available from Writing Associates and Research Librarians. The group will close the day at 4 p.m., regrouping to check-in about writing goals and to celebrate progress made.

This offering is a response to the Graduate Student Council’s request for increased writing support for graduate students.

NAXOS Music Library Currently Unavailable

NAXOS Music Library has been down since Thursday, December 1. The problem has been reported to NAXOS support. Despite what the error message says, our license has not expired. In November 2016, we renewed until December 2017.

A notice will be posted here as soon as the resource is back up and running. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thank you.

EVENT | Pizza Nights

 

 

84a24e_0631a147db134c92bd8a6701acc3ec2c-jpg_srz_925_616_85_22_0-50_1-20_0Who wants some pizza?

Every semester the Library hosts two nights of pizza to fortify your studying. The first (Tuesday) night will be in the Rock. The next night (Wednesday) there will be pizza in Friedman Study Center at the SciLi. Students that enjoy studying in a library as well as eating pizza are encouraged to attend.

Schedule:
Tuesday, December 13  |  9 p.m.  | Rockefeller Library Lobby
Wednesday, December 14  |  9 p.m.  |  Friedman Study Center (SciLi)

Pizza nights are sponsored by the Library, Campus Life, and an ever true Brown Family.

Good luck with exams!

#pizzanights

Updates from Around the Library | December 2016

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The Library has been full of activity near the close of 2016.

Here are a few updates:

EVENT | Annual S. T. Joshi Fellow Presentation : Matthew Beach and “Lovecraft’s Consolation”

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On Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 4:00 p.m. at the John Hay Library, S. T. Joshi Endowed Research Fellow Matthew Beach will give a presentation entitled, “Lovecraft’s Consolation.” Beach is the second recipient of the Joshi Fellowship, which supports research relating to H.P. Lovecraft, his associates, and literary heirs. Working with the H. P. Lovecraft papers at the John Hay Library, Beach investigated Lovecraft’s theories on weird fiction and time in support of his dissertation research. Over the course of the two-month fellowship, Mr. Beach also became interested in a series of letters that he identified as “consolation letters.” Conversation and refreshments to follow.

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Matthew Beach

Matthew Beach is a doctoral candidate in the English Department at Brown University. His research focuses on time, affect, and the body in American literature, particularly in popular genres such as pulp and sentimental fiction.

The S. T. Joshi Endowed Research Fellowship for 2017 is now open. Additional information is available online: http://library.brown.edu/joshi/

Date: Thursday, December 8, 2016
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

POSTPONED | DEFYING THE NAZIS: THE SHARPS’ WAR Reading and Panel Discussion

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THIS EVENT IS POSTPONED UNTIL SPRING 2017.

Spend an evening with author Artemis Joukowsky III P’14, P’16, who tells the incredible story of his grandparents, Martha Ingham Dickie (Brown 1926) and Rev. Waitstill Hastings Sharp in his new book, Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War (Beacon Press, 2016).

Artemis Joukowsky will read from his book and lead a panel discussion featuring his parents, Martha Sharp Joukowsky, PhD ’58, PHB’82 hon., LHD’85 hon., P’87, GP’13, GP’14, GP’16, GP’17 and Artie Joukowsky, Jr. ’55, LLD’85 hon., P87, GP’13, GP’14, GP’16, GP’17. A reception and book-signing will follow the discussion. Books will be available for sale from the Brown Bookstore. This event is free and open to the public.

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

The Sharps, who helped to found the Unitarian Service Committee in the midst of World War II, personally oversaw USC efforts to rescue refugees from dire situations under Nazi occupation in Czechoslovakia and France and helped to save hundreds of lives across Europe. Defying the Nazis supplements the PBS documentary of the same name co-produced by Joukowsky with Ken Burns, which premiered on PBS stations in mid-September. Joukowsky’s book fleshes out the Sharps’ story in ways that simply could not be done within the boundaries of a 90 minute film.

Artemis has been researching the wartime efforts of his grandparents since he was a teenager, and over the past four decades has compiled important documentation about their work with refugees and its ultimate costs on their marriage and family. This is a story of simple people finding strength they had no idea they possessed. It is a story of individuals standing up to unthinkable evil. It is a story that contains both the twists and turns of a classic spy thriller, as well as the heartbreaks and triumphs of the most compelling drama. And, above all, Defying the Nazis is a tragic love story—a story of what one man and one woman could accomplish together, and how those very achievements pulled them apart.

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Children’s Journey to Freedom : A Report by Martha Sharp of the First Children’s Emigration Project, Unitarian Service Committee, 1941

Date: Spring 2017

Event | In the Mountains of Madness: A Reading with Author W. Scott Poole

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On Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, W. Scott Poole will give a reading from his new book, In the Mountains of Madness: The Life and Extraordinary Afterlife of H. P. Lovecraft. A discussion will follow the reading. This event is free and open to the public. The book will be available for purchase before and after the event.

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS (SEPTEMBER 2016, 978-1-59376-674-4)

In the Mountains of Madness interweaves the biography of the legendary writer with an exploration of Lovecraft as a phenomenon. It aims to explain this reclusive figure while also challenging some of the general views held by Lovecraft devotees, focusing specifically on the large cross-section of horror and science fiction fans who know Lovecraft through films, Role Playing Games, and video games directly influenced by his work, but who know little or nothing about him.

From a childhood wracked with fear and intense hallucinations, Lovecraft would eventually embrace the mystical, creating ways in which his unrestrained imaginary life intersected with the world he found so difficult to endure. The monsters of his dreams became his muses. Yet, Poole insists that Lovecraft was not the Victorian prude who wrote “squishy monster stories for boys.” Rather he was a kind of neo-romantic mystic whose love of the 18th century allowed him to bring together a bit of Isaac Newton with a bit of William Blake in a real marriage of heaven and hell.

More than a traditional biography, In the Mountains of Madness places Lovecraft and his work in a cultural context, as an artist more in tune with our time than his own. Much of the literary work on Lovecraft tries to place him in relation to Poe or M.R. James or Arthur Machen; these ideas have little meaning for most contemporary readers. In his provocative new book, Poole reclaims the true essence of Lovecraft in relation to the comics of Joe Lansdale, the novels of Stephen King, and some of the biggest blockbuster films in contemporary America, proving the undying influence of this rare and significant figure.

About W. Scott Poole

Poole, scott (c) Leslie McKellar (1)W. Scott Poole, who teaches at the College of Charleston, has written widely about American history, horror, and pop culture. His books include Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror and his award-winning history Monsters in America, which received the John G. Cawelti prize from the Popular Culture Association and was named among the “Best of the Best” by the AAUP for 2011. Poole is a regular contributor to Popmatters and his work has appeared in the Huffington Post, Religion Dispatches, and Killing the Buddha.

Date: Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Dictionarium sinicum and Early Chinese Studies

Excerpt from Chinese-Latin dictionary with notes in Latin by Benjamin Bowen Carter. Dictionarium sinicum, page 608.


by Man Shun Yeung and Caroline Frank

Five years ago John Eng-Wong was looking for art for his office in American Studies, and University Curator Robert Emlen offered him a portrait of Benjamin Bowen Carter. Prompted by the painting, Eng-wong began to look into Carter’s background. A member of Brown University’s class of 1786 and a surgeon trained under Benjamin Rush, Carter was also one of the earliest Rhode Islander’s to sail to Canton as ship’s supercargo. Digging deeper into the archives, Eng-Wong, of Chinese descent himself, learned that Carter was perhaps the first American to make a serious attempt to learn Chinese. His research led him to Brown University Library Special Collections and two oversized eighteenth-century handwritten Chinese-Latin dictionaries—one bound and titled the Dictionarium sinicum, and the other in loose manuscript form.

Investigating this transpacific subject further, Eng-Wong then learned of a scholar in China also researching Carter—Professor Man Shun Yeung of The University of Hong Kong, who has now made two research visits to Brown University. Using rare resources found in both Brown University Library and the Rhode Island Historical Society archives, Professor Yeung intends to shine light on Carter’s role as an American pioneer in Chinese studies. His review of these two Chinese-Latin dictionaries reveals that Brown University is one of the very few special collections libraries in the world to own two different editions of the Hanzixiyi漢字西譯 (“Western Translation of Chinese Characters”) compiled by the Italian Franciscan priest Basile de Glemona (葉宗賢/葉尊教, 1648-1704). Glemona compiled the first edition of his dictionary between 1685-1694 when he was in Guangzhou and Nanjing, and the second edition between 1694-1700 when he was in Nanjing.

The Dictionarium sinicum was originally in Benjamin Bowen Carter’s possession. The “Carter manuscript” was donated by John Carter Brown (1797-1874)in 1844, as noted by his own inscription:

This volume belonged to my maternal uncle Doctor Benjamin Bowen Carter, a graduate of BU class 1786. Dr C. was a fine linguist & particularly versed in the Oriental languages & literature. He died in the City of New York AD 1831, aged 60 years.

It gives me pleasure to deposit this curious book in the College Library for preservation & for the use of those who may desire to consult it. 

Jhn Carter Brown
June 24,
1844

The dictionary also includes notes from Benjamin Bowen Carter. Carter’s remarks provide important information on the transcription of the manuscript and his own instructions for understanding Chinese characters and pronunciation. Taking into consideration that the Chinese characters are arranged according to phonetic order, this manuscript is believed to be a handwritten copy of the second edition of Glemona’s dictionary.

The other Chinese-Latin dictionary now in Special Collections was owned by Samuel Ward (1756-1832). The “Ward manuscript” has an inscription on the front cover which reads “A Chinese Dictionary by Col Saml Ward,” and is described as “Chinese Dictionary with Manuscript Notes in Latin.” During 1788 and 1789, Samuel Ward sailed to China on the vessel General Washington, managing trade for the Providence firm Brown & Francis. It is uncertain when or where he acquired the manuscript. Judging from the fact that the Chinese characters are arranged according to the Chinese radicals 部首 and the Chinese title “漢字西譯” is inscribed at the end of the main contents, this manuscript is believed to be a handwritten copy of the first edition of Glemona’s dictionary. In the first seventeen pages, Guanhua官話 (term for the language of the officials) transliterations and Latin explanations supplement the Chinese characters.

The narrative that these two dictionaries document reshapes our understanding of early Sino-American cultural relations, and offers a glimpse into transpacific connections in the late eighteenth century. The Dictionarium sinicum will be on display on the second floor of the John Hay Library through August 19.

Exhibit | Works from Contemporary Architecture: A Course with Professor Dietrich Neumann

 

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The works displayed in this exhibit were created by students in Professor Dietrich Neumann’s lecture course, “Contemporary Architecture,” which surveys stylistic, technological, and theoretical developments in architecture from the 1960s to the present.

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Students were asked to create a model based on a building or industrial design object of this time period.

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Date: May 18 – September 30, 2016
TimeRockefeller Library Hours
Location: Finn Reading Room Cases, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

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