Event | Pizza Nights

Pizza

It’s that time of year!

Pizza Nights are here!

Every semester the Library hosts two nights of pizza to fortify your studying. The first (Tuesday) night will be in the Sciences Library. The next night (Wednesday) there will be pizza in the Rock. Students that enjoy studying in a library as well as eating pizza are encouraged to attend.

Schedule
Tuesday, May 10  |  9 p.m.  | Friedman Center (SciLi)
Wednesday, May 11  |  9 p.m.  |  Rockefeller Library Lobby

This semester’s pizza nights are sponsored by the Library, Campus Life, and an ever true Brown Family.

Good luck with exams!

#pizzanight

The Gregory Corso Papers – the unpublished poetry of a Beat poet

Gregory Corso in a hotel room, circa 1983

Gregory Corso in a hotel room, circa 1983

The Gregory Corso papers, a collection of unpublished poetry, writings, photographs and original oil paintings, are now available for research at the John Hay Library.  They provide an intimate look into the complicated life and work of one of the most influential Beat poets of his generation.

Corso was born in 1930 in New York City.  His mother left the family when he was a year old and he spent his childhood enduring various orphanages, foster homes, reform schools, and on the streets.  At sixteen, he landed in jail for robbery and was sentenced to three years at the Clinton State Prison. During his stay there, he compensated for his lack of a traditional education by frequenting the prison library where he discovered the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Arthur Rimbaud, among others, and began writing his own poetry.

He met Allen Ginsberg at a bar in Greenwich Village in 1950, a chance encounter that precipitated what was to become a lasting personal and creative relationship. Ginsberg recognized Corso’s talent and the originality of his poetic voice. Through Ginsberg, Corso met and became friends with other writers in Ginsberg’s circle, including Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, and Neal Cassady, many of whom become not only influential in Corso’s artistic development, but leading figures in the Beat movement of that era.

A page in Notebook No.8 in the Corso papers.  The text reads: "2 very profound beings. Thinker. Poet."

A drawing by Corso in Notebook No.8. The text reads: “2 very profound beings. Thinker. Poet.”

The manuscripts and working notebooks that make up the bulk of the Gregory Corso papers include drafts for an unpublished book of poetry he titled “The Golden Dot.” His notebooks are full of reminiscences, musings about life, drafts for poems, and drawings. The manuscripts are supplemented by correspondence, paintings, photographs, and a small but interesting assortment of other materials, including phonograph records, VHS cassettes, books and ephemeral materials. The bulk of the collection dates from 1980 to 1983 when he was living in New York City and became friends with a poet named Laura Boss.

A letter in the collection from Laura Boss to Allen Ginsberg in January 1984  summed up her experience of Corso: “Gregory is the most charming and least charming man I have ever known. He can come closer to the truth than anyone…and the most outrageous liar I have ever met…”  Researchers are encouraged to visit the John Hay Library to utilize these previously unknown resources that document the life of an influential poet and writer.

Special Collections | Hubert Jennings Papers on Fernando Pessoa

Hubert Jennings at enlistment for World War I

Hubert Jennings at enlistment for World War I

In October 2015, Christopher Jennings and Bridget Winstanley, son and daughter of British and South African scholar Hubert Dudley Jennings, donated their father’s personal papers to Brown University Library.

In January of this year, Folha de S.Paulo, one of Brazil’s leading daily newspapers, featured an article about the discovery of the Hubert Jennings archive in a garage in Johannesburg and its subsequent donation to the Brown University Library. Professor Onésimo Almeida published a response to this article in Malomil.

Born in London in 1896, Hubert Jennings served in World War I and moved to South Africa after graduating from the University of Wales. In his newly adopted land, Jennings became Assistant Headmaster at Durban High School, where he remained employed for the next twelve years (1923-1935). Jennings was one of the first biographers of Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa and one of the first scholars to be interested in Pessoa’s English poetry. Jennings left an invaluable contribution to Pessoan studies with his biographical works on the poet’s stay in South Africa – Fernando Pessoa in Durban (1986) and Os Dois Exílios: Fernando Pessoa na África do Sul (1984).

Through this gift, soon accessible online and in physical form at the John Hay Library, scholars will get a unique glimpse at Pessoa’s life in South Africa following his father’s death. Aside from his published works, Hubert Jennings also left a complete and unpublished book about Fernando Pessoa; plans and notes for other books on the noted writer; an inventory of Pessoa’s estate; numerous transcriptions and translations of Pessoa’s poetry and prose; original short stories taking place in Portugal; a considerable correspondence with writers and scholars from around the world interested in Pessoa’s work; and photos and copies of documents regarding Pessoa’s life, which complement the collection of artifacts housed at the National Library of Portugal and the Casa Pessoa.

Jennings at his desk

Jennings at his desk

Exhibit | Cardboard Revolution: Cartoneras, Literacy, and Sustainable Publishing in Brazil

CardboardRevolution-Finn_web

On March 31, 2016, the Brown University Library will host the reception for the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) annual conference. As part of the conference, the Library is mounting an exhibit featuring two independent publishers from Brazil: Dulcinéia Catadora and Mariposa Cartonera, entitled “Cardboard Revolution: Cartoneras, Literacy, and Sustainable Publishing in Brazil.” The exhibit will be installed in the Finn Room cases at the Rockefeller Library.

Drawn from the diverse materials of Brown University Library’s Brasiliana Collection, the chapbooks in this exhibition showcase the vibrant productions of two independent Brazilian publishing collectives, DULCINÉIA CATADORA and MARIPOSA CARTONERA. The collectives are representative of the widespread Latin American practice of cartonera—an alternative publishing and art venture committed to social activism, economic justice, cooperative creativity, and literacy. The books of poetry and prose feature prominent and undiscovered writers and are bound in distinctive covers crafted in workshops by the collectives, community members and artists.

Date: March 30 – May 2, 2016
Time: Library Hours
Location: Finn Room Exhibit Cases, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Wilmeth Lecture & Exhibit | “Actors and Other Monsters: Graphic Satire As Blood Sport, 1789–1830” with Joseph Roach

Crowding to the Pit

“Crowding to the Pit,” print by Theodore Lane, 1821 (after Robert Dighton).

On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 7 p.m. at the John Hay Library, Joseph Roach, the Sterling Professor of Theater at Yale University, will deliver the 12th Annual Don Wilmeth Endowed Lectureship in Theatre and Entertainment entitled, “Actors and Other Monsters: Graphic Satire As Blood Sport, 1789–1830.” The lecture is complemented by an exhibit curated by Professor Wilmeth.

This event is free and open to the public.

Lecture

Attendees will discover how monstrosity thrives in the golden age of graphic satire, and how few monsters of caricature surpass actors for appearing not only with warts and all, but also as all warts. Politicians do rival them in ridicule, however—as fat as Richard Brinsley Sheridan (himself a politician as well as a playwright), as cadaverous as John Philip Kemble, or as Lilliputian as child star Master Betty—convened alike by John Bull as butts of national laughter in a Parliament of freaks.

Exhibit

Accompanying the lecture is a special exhibit curated by Prof. Wilmeth on “The Golden Age of British Theatre Caricature” with dozens of examples of prints—etchings, engravings and other popular visual forms depicting popular theatre during the late Georgian and early Regency periods in Great Britain. Among the artists represented in the exhibit are Robert Dighton, James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, the Cruikshank family, Samuel de Wilde, and others who entertained the public with their satiric magic on paper, highlighted by several special events during this period (the young acting prodigy Master Betty, the Old Price riots at Covent Garden Theatre, and the actor Edmund Kean’s scandalous escapades, among others). In general, these delightful visual pieces serve as instruments of journalistic ego deflation of these subjects. This exhibit is installed in the Willis Reading Room cases and in the Lownes Room cases. Please ask at the front desk for access to the Lownes Room.

Professor Joseph Roach

RoachA theatre historian, stage director, and performance studies scholar, Joseph Roach is the author of The Player’s Passion: Studies in the Science of Acting (1985), Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance (1996) and It (2007). He is the editor (with Janelle Reinelt) of Critical Theory and Performance (2ndedition, revised 2007) and Changing the Subject: Marvin Carlson and Theatre Studies, 1959-2009 (2009). His publications have been recognized by the James Russell Lowell Prize from the Modern Language Association, the Barnard Hewitt Award in Theatre History, and the Joe E. Calloway Prize for Drama.  Before coming to Yale, he chaired the Department of Performing Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre at Northwestern University, and the Department of Performance Studies in the Tisch School of Arts at NYU. He is the recipient of a Lifetime Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Society for Theatre Research and a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which funds the World Performance Project at Yale. In 2009, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Warwick (UK) and the Fletcher Jones Distinguished Fellowship from the Huntington Library.

Date: March 21, 2016
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

"Opinions respecting the Young Roscious (Master Better)," engraving by Thomas Rowlandson, London, 1804.

“Opinions respecting the Young Roscious (Master Better),” engraving by Thomas Rowlandson, London, 1804.

Brown in the Great War

WarMemorial
A new digital resource that highlights materials from the University Archives and Special Collections is now available: “Brown in the Great War.”

The website focuses on Brown community members who participated in, fought, and died in World War I, as well as the social landscape of Brown from 1914 to 1921. This eloquent resource was researched and developed by Robin Wheelwright Ness (Senior Library Specialist, John Hay Library) for a practicum requirement towards her master’s degree in Public Humanities. 

As part of a second practicum, Robin is compiling a list that will reflect the John Hay Library’s primary resources pertaining to World War I. Additional University Archives and Special Collections material can be found through subject guides, Collections A to Z, or the online Library catalog (Josiah).

For more information please contact Jennifer Betts, University Archivist, at jennifer_betts@brown.edu.

Event | Roger Schonfeld Talk on Libraries and Scholarly Practices

sr_roger2-306x255-c-defaultOn Tuesday, March 8 from 12 – 1:30 p.m. in the DSL, Roger Schonfeld, director of Ithaka S+R’s Libraries and Scholarly Communication Program, will give a talk about his work with libraries and scholarly practices. A light lunch will be served.

In his role as director, Roger leads Ithaka S+R’s studies of academics’ and students’ attitudes, practices, and needs, as well research on the changing role of the academic library, scholarly publisher, and learned society. He also consults with libraries and library consortia, digital humanities projects, distinctive collections and centers of excellence, and scholarly publishers.

Roger has served on the NSF Blue Ribbon Task Force for Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access and NISO’s Open Discovery Initiative. Earlier, he was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, where he worked on projects related to college athletics and scholarly communication. Roger has a degree in English Literature from Yale University.

Key projects at Ithaka S+R that Roger has led include the Ithaka S+R Faculty Survey; projects on the changing research methods and practices of faculty members in fields such as history and chemistry; studies of the impact and sustainability of courseware initiatives; the Ithaka S+R Library Survey of deans and directors; a number of projects on library strategy, economics, and collections analysis, with a particular emphasis on digitization, management, and preservation of library collections.

Date: March 8, 2016
Time: 12 – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Celebrate the New Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio with Open Studios

digital-studio_homepage-banner_v1

Join the Brown University Library for “Open Studios” on Friday, March 11, 2016, to celebrate the opening of the new Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, located on the first floor of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library.

Stop by anytime between 2 – 5 p.m. to learn how you can use the new studio. Tour the spaces and equipment. See examples of cutting edge digital scholarship from around the Brown campus and beyond. Meet members of the Center for Digital Scholarship and see brief demonstrations of the workshops they teach throughout the semester.

All are welcome. Cookies, coffee, and tea will be served. See you there!

Date: Friday, March 11, 2016
Time: 2 – 5 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | A President Lincoln Hackathon with Parlor Monuments to the Illustrious Dead

lincoln hack

In honor of the 155th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s first inauguration, join us in the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio for a 3D hackathon at noon on March 4, 2016.

We’ll use a 3D scanner and other tools to study “Parlor Monuments to the Illustrious Dead,” a 19th century Lego-like children’s game about the Civil War. The game’s instructions are lost: can we recreate them and remix the parts, and how can the digital technologies help us?

We will be joined by Holly Snyder, Curator of American Historical Collections at the John Hay Library.

Date: Friday, March 4, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

lincoln cubes

Carberry Day | Leap Year

carphoto

The Brown University Library celebrates Josiah S. Carberry Day every February 29, occurring only in a leap year.

In celebration, there will be fresh fruit and cookies available in the lobby at the Rockefeller Library and the Friedman Center at the Sciences Library.

Consider leaving your loose change in a Brown jug (AKA “cracked pot”). The jugs will be out near the fruit and cookies. All donations go toward the Carberry Fund.

Known to show up unannounced in unlikely places, Carberry has been seen but never verified on campus. Will you spot the elusive man himself? If you do, try to capture him with a photo and share on Twitter or Instagram with #JosiahCarberry.

To share on Facebook, friend Josiah Carberry and tag him in the photo.

Happy Josiah S. Carberry Day!