Event | “What If We Design a Digital Edition and Invite Everyone?: Infinite Ulysses, Participatory Literature, and the Public Digital Humanities” with Amanda Visconti

AmandaVThe Library and the Cogut Center for the Humanities are pleased to welcome Amanda Visconti, Digital Humanities Specialist and Assistant Professor in the Libraries at Purdue University, who will present a talk entitled, “What If We Design a Digital Edition and Invite Everyone?: Infinite Ulysses, Participatory Literature, and the Public Digital Humanities,” at 10 a.m. on Thursday, November 12, 2015 in the Digital Scholarship Lab on the first floor of the Rockefeller Library. The talk will be followed by a question and answer period along with a reception in the DSL.

An early promise of digital humanities—radically increased public access to human culture past and present—has largely been kept, but making projects publicly accessible doesn’t in itself realize a public humanities. DH projects increasingly push beyond public access, designing for public participation by prioritizing inclusion, recognition of participants, and intuitive interface use. This talk will use the design and usertesting of the Infinite Ulysses participatory digital edition (InfiniteUlysses.com) to explore what designing for participation can mean for a digital humanities project.

Infinite Ulysses is a digital edition inviting participatory social annotation of Joyce’s challenging but rewarding novel Ulysses. Drawing on mechanics tested and refined by non-academic online communities like Reddit and StackExchange, the interface experimented with social curation and moderation, attempting to personalize which annotations a given reader sees to their background and interests. From early use data for this proof of concept, we’ll think about ways to increase meaningful public participation in the digital humanities through participatory design, usertesting, and diverse research applications for social annotation data.

Dr. Amanda Visconti designs, codes, and analyzes user and site data toward helping the humanities grow more open: not just publicly accessible, but inviting and supporting public participation. She is the Digital Humanities Specialist and an assistant professor in the Libraries at Purdue University. An active maker and member of the digital humanities community, Visconti’s recently completed University of Maryland Literature Ph.D. consisted of the design, code, and user-testing of an experimental social reading interface (InfiniteUlysses.com) instead of a proto-monograph. Visconti holds an Information M.S. with a specialization in digital humanities HCI from the University of Michigan, where she worked with public humanities enthusiasts to identify small design changes that could open scholarly websites to public use.

A professional scholarly web developer for over eight years, Visconti has worked since 2009 in various roles at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH, mith.umd.edu), one of the world’s top digital humanities R&D centers. She tweets @Literature_Geek, blogs her design research at LiteratureGeek.com, runs the Digital Humanities Slack team (http://bit.ly/1jI8VUx), and maintains a project portfolio at AmandaVisconti.com.

Professor Visconti’s talk is co-sponsored by the Cogut Center for the Humanities and the Brown University Library’s lecture series, New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation.

Date: Thursday, November 12, 2015
Time: 10 a.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | The Spatial History Project at Stanford University with Erik Steiner

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The Brown University Library is proud to be a co-sponsor of the Spacial Humanities Lecture Series, along with Spacial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4) and the M. B. Mandeville Lectureship Fund.

On Friday, November 13, 2015 at 12 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab in the Rockefeller Library, Erik Steiner will give a talk about the Spatial History Project at Stanford University.

This talk will be an open reflection on the experience of developing spatial/digital/geo humanities projects at the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA) at Stanford. Erik will elaborate on projects CESTA has undertaken, focusing on the practical details of how such projects operate. He will also discuss how (and whether) creative practices in data visualization and cartography are contributing substantively to collaborative research.

Erik helped found the CESTA Lab in 2007, serving as the first Lab Director until 2010. He now serves as the Creative Director of the Spatial History Project. Before coming to Stanford, Erik worked at the InfoGraphics Lab in the Department of Geography at the University of Oregon. Erik has fifteen years’ experience in leading the design and development of print and interactive information visualizations, including CD-ROMs, atlases, websites, and museum kiosks. He is also a former president of the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS). A designer at heart, Erik is passionate about building deep creative partnerships that cut across disciplines and expertise.

Upcoming lectures in the series:

March 25, 2016
Tom Elliott, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

April 8, 2016
Bill Rankin, History of Science, Yale University

Date: Friday, November 13, 2015
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Opportunity | Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research

Beatrice Senocak ’15 receives the 2015 Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research

Beatrice Senocak ’15 receives the 2015 Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research

Are you an undergraduate who is working on an interesting research project? Consider submitting it to this prize contest.

In partnership with the Office of the Dean of the College, the Brown University Library sponsors the annual Undergraduate Research Prize. The purpose of the prize is to recognize excellence in undergraduate research projects that make creative and extensive use of the Brown University Library’s collections, including, but not limited to, print resources, databases, primary resources, and materials in all media. The project may take the form of a traditional paper, a database, a website or other digital project.

Deadline: April 1, 2016

Up to two prizes of $750 each may be given. Prize recipients will be honored at a Library reception and will be asked to give a short presentation on their research projects.

Prize winning projects will be honored on the Brown University Library website and added to the Brown Archives.

Eligibility

Applicants must be a current full-time student working towards a Brown University undergraduate degree.

Eligible projects:

  • Need to have been completed during 2015.
  • Can be submitted by an individual or by a team.
  • Can be either an independent research effort or an assignment for a credit class.
  • Can not be a senior honors thesis.
  • Multimedia/digital projects are encouraged.

Winners will be announced on April 15, 2016.

Visit the website for the Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research for more information and to view past winning projects.

Leah Jones ’17 and Richard Salamé ’16 receive the 2014 Library Innovation Prize

Leah Jones ’17 and Richard Salamé ’16 receive the 2014 Library Innovation Prize

Event | Carberry Day, Carberry Talk, Carberry Dinner, Carberry Cookies, Carberry Everything!

CarberryDinner111315

Each Friday the 13th and February 29th, Professor Josiah S. Carberry celebrates his birthday, and the Brown University Library celebrates with him.

On Friday, November 13 at 4 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Professor Peter H. Schultz will talk about the geo-impact of Carberry on his own career in his talk, “From my little Red Flyer to a Rendezvous with a Comet – Journey with Carberry.” The talk is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Join us for dinner with Professor Carberry in the Portrait Room of the Brown Faculty Club that night. Cash bar cocktails at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:45 p.m. At 7:30 p.m., Professor Schultz will recap his talk from earlier. Dinner is $40 per person. The menu will feature recipes from the Carberry Cookbook. Click here to make a required reservation.

Can’t make the dinner? Enjoy cookies on Professor Carberry in the lobby of the Rockefeller Library and in the Friedman Center at the Sciences Library.

Date: Friday, November 13, 2015
Time: 4 p.m. for the talk; 6 p.m. for cocktails and dinner; all day for cookies
Locations: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence; Brown Faculty Club, One Magee Street, Providence; Friedman Center, Sciences Library, 201 Thayer Street, Providence

Event | “The Sophisticated Silliness of S. J. Perelman ’25” with Sean Kelly ’84

S. J. Perelman / Life Magazine

S. J. Perelman / Life Magazine

The Library is pleased to welcome Brown alumnus Sean Kelly ’84, who will deliver a talk entitled, “The Sophisticated Silliness of S. J. Perelman ’25,” on Thursday, November 5, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library. The talk will be followed by a Q&A period and a reception.

PerelmanBookImageThe event will also highlight S. J. Perelman, the newest release from the Brown Ziggurat Press. Part of the Brooke Hunt Mitchell Distinguished Author Series, the book consists of an essay by Daniel Asa Rose ’71, P ’17 and a surprise pop-up on the last page that depicts Perelman’s famous portrait by his friend Al Hirschfeld. For more information about the handmade book, including how to purchase it, please click here.

One of the preeminent humorists in American literature and film, S.J. Perelman, Brown Class of 1925, wrote hilarious essays for The New Yorker, comedies for the Marx Brothers, short story collections, Broadway plays, and an Oscar-winning film. It all began at Brown with his cartoons for the student humor magazine.

Sean Kelly '84

Sean Kelly ’84

In this multi-media presentation, Mr. Kelly, an illustrator, will share Perelman’s highly original college work, trace his influence on today’s top comedy writers — including many Brown alumni — and reveal the genius’s creative process through rare documents from the S. J. Perelman collection at the John Hay Library.

Sean Kelly has produced thousands of illustrations for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, and The Atlantic, among other publications. His work has received awards from the Society of Illustrators and the National Cartoonists Society.

Date: Thursday, November 5, 2015
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | “Space, Place, and the Humanities: The Emergence of the GeoHumanities” with Tim Cresswell

HIST-Cresswell-web1

The Brown University Library is proud to be a co-sponsor of the Spacial Humanities Lecture Series, along with Spacial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4) and the M. B. Mandeville Lectureship Fund.

On Friday, October 23, 2015 at 12 p.m. in the Population Studies and Training Center within Mencoff Hall, Tim Cresswell will deliver the lecture, “Space, Place, and the Humanities: The Emergence of the GeoHumanities.”

Tim is Professor of History and International Affairs at Northeastern University and associate director for public humanities at the Northeastern Humanities Center. He is co-editor of the new journal GeoHumanities published by the American Association of Geographers.

In his talk, Tim will outline the development of the new interdisciplinary field of the GeoHumanities, linking relatively recent developments in the digital humanities and GIS to ancient concerns for space, place, and ways in which we inhabit the world, the flowering of spatial theory since the 1970s in geography, and the spatial turn across the humanities and social sciences of the last few decades. In addition, he will link the fusion of all of these histories with the embrace of “geo” themes in the creative arts, ranging from geo-poetry to conceptual art. While the emergence of GeoHumanities is not without problems and dangers, Tim will argue that the new field presents many theoretical, creative, and strategic opportunities for scholars across the humanities and social sciences.

Upcoming lectures in the series:

November 13, 2015
Erik Steiner, Spatial History Project, Stanford University

March 25, 2016
Tom Elliott, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

April 8, 2016
Bill Rankin, History of Science, Yale University

Date: Friday, October 23, 2015
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Population Studies and Training Center, Mencoff Hall, 68 Waterman Street, Providence

Event | “Raising the Impact of Research and Education through Openness” with Nick Shockey

NickShockey

As part of our celebration of International Open Access Week, the Brown University Library is pleased to welcome Nick Shockey, who will deliver a talk entitled, “Raising the Impact of Research and Education through Openness,” on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 at 7 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab. A question and answer session and reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public.

Technology has revolutionized the way we create and share knowledge, opening up pathways to advance and democratize research and education that are just beginning to be realized. New models that fully harness this potential are developing, from Open Access, which ensures the free, immediate online availability of research articles with full reuse rights, to Open Educational Resources, which make textbooks and other materials free for anyone to use, tailor, and share. Nick will discuss how openness can accelerate scholarship, benefit researchers, and improve education—including specific recommendations for how members of the campus community can get involved.

Nick is the Director of Programs & Engagement for SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, and founding Director of the Right to Research Coalition, an international alliance of student organizations that promote Open Access to the results of research through advocacy and education.

Since its launch in 2009, the Right to Research Coalition has grown to include more than 75 member student organizations, which collectively represent nearly 7 million students in over 100 countries around the world. In 2014, Nick led the launch of OpenCon, a new conference series that brings together leading students and early career advocates from around the world to advance the issues of Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data.

Date: Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | “Whither the Scholarly Monograph” with Laura Mandell

LauraMandell

The Library and the Cogut Center for the Humanities are pleased to welcome Laura Mandell, Professor of English and Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture at Texas A&M University, who will present a talk entitled, “Whither the Scholarly Monograph,” at 3 p.m. on Friday, October 2, 2015 in the Digital Scholarship Lab on the first floor of the Rockefeller Library. The talk will be followed by a question and answer period along with a reception in the DSL.

Laura Mandell is Professor of English and Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture at Texas A&M University. She is the author of Breaking the Book: Print Humanities in the Digital Age (2015), Misogynous Economies: The Business of Literature in Eighteenth-Century Britain (1999), a Longman Cultural Edition of The Castle of Otranto and Man of Feeling, and numerous articles primarily about eighteenth-century women writers. An article in New Literary History, “What Is the Matter? What Literary History Neither Hears Nor Sees,” describes how digital work can be used to conduct research into conceptions informing the writing and printing of eighteenth-century poetry. She is Project Director of the Poetess Archive, an online scholarly edition and database of women poets, 1750-1900, Director of 18thConnect, and Director of ARC, the Advanced Research Consortium, overseeing NINES, 18thConnect, and MESA.

Her current research involves developing new methods for visualizing poetry, developing software that will allow all scholars to deep-code documents for data-mining, and improving OCR software for early modern and 18th-c. texts via high performance and cluster computing.

Professor Mandell’s talk is co-sponsored by the Cogut Center for the Humanities and the Brown University Library’s lecture series, New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation.

Date: Friday, October 2, 2015
Time: 3 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

 

New Director of the John Hay Library and Special Collections | Christopher Geissler

 

Geissler_Christopher

Christopher Geissler has been appointed the Director of the John Hay Library and Special Collections. Christopher will begin this new role effective September 21, 2015.

Christopher has held two previous positions at Brown: first as Project Archivist in the University Archives and more recently as Librarian for American and British Literary and Popular Culture Collections. In addition, Christopher has held positions at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library in Williamstown, MA, and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.

Christopher earned degrees in American Studies at Yale University (B.A., M.A., M.Phil.) and received a Masters in Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Exhibit | Poetry from the Age of Mass Incarceration

PrisonPoetry

Drawn from the collections of Brown University Library, the exhibit investigates the poetic work of men and women incarcerated in the United States in the last decades of the twentieth-century. It is an open-ended examination of the challenges and potential for communication across the socio-economic divide engendered by mass incarceration.

Online exhibit: Poetry from the Age of Mass Incarceration

Dates: September 21, 2015 – January 4, 2016
Time: Open to the public 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday
Location: Willis Reading Room Gallery, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence