2016 Library Innovation Prize | The Winning Game and More

Emma Gleeman ’15 describing her winning game, “Ruckus at the Rock”

The Library is pleased to announce that Emma Gleeman ‘15 is the winner of this year’s Library Innovation Prize. This year, the Prize asked students to design games that drew on the Library as a space for play or that used the Library’s collections as content for the game. Emma’s design is a collaborative storytelling game titled “Ruckus at the Rock.”

In her game, players face a catastrophe taking place in the Library drawn from a deck of cards: a swarm of bees in the Absolute Quiet Room! Josiah Carbery’s ghost is hurling cracked pots at you! The snack cart runs out of coffee! They then draw three items from a second deck—a rolling chair, a desk lamp, and a red velvet muffin—and must come up with a story that uses all three items to avert the ruckus at the Rock.

During the presentation in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Gleeman presented her handmade game components in a cut-up copy of Boccaccio’s Decameron. She was careful to point out that the copy did not come from the stacks in the Rock! She also showed a video of friends play testing the game so attendees could better understand how it works. The judges praised Gleeman’s work for the cooperative nature of play, the creativity and fun it inspired, and how it highlighted many familiar aspects of the Rock and how students interact with it on a daily basis.

Alicia Stepanov

Brigitte Stepanov

Four other games were presented at the Innovation Prize Showcase, which took place April 15, 2016. Graduate student Brigitte Stepanov debuted “Library Quest,” which asked teams to complete a number of missions across the different libraries at Brown. These quests included trivia questions, finding good study spaces in a library, and finding paintings in the Annmary Brown Memorial or lounge furniture in the SciLi. Brigitte even designed her own game to be played within her game.

Alicia DaVos

Alicia DeVos

Alicia DeVos ’18 presented “To the Letter,” which gave players a list of clues to find around the library. These clues were all letters that would then be rearranged to solve the puzzle and lead players to a prize. For example, one clue asked individuals to find the twenty-third letter of the quotation by the entrance to the Rock. DeVos anticipated that “To the Letter” could be played in spurts, as a study break activity, with students tackling one clue at a time.

Rebecca Andrews

Rebecca Andrews

Rebecca Andrews ’18 similarly designed an experience for students who needed a break from their work. “Library Hunt” presents a game of hide and go seek in the Library. Those who are hiding grab the book that is closest to them and texts its title and author to the player who is “it.” The player who is “it” uses library resources to find those who are hiding, looking through the catalog and then navigating through the stacks. The hiders had to stay in place for four minutes after sending their text and then could try to make it back to base. Andrews reported that the game helped her become more familiar with both Library resources and with the layout of the Rock. She also recommended level A as the best place to hide!

Graduate Student Group

Public Humanities Graduate Student Group

Finally, a team of graduate students from the Public Humanities program—Leah Burgin, Maggie Unverzagt Goddard, Tyler French, Andrea Ledesma, and Inge Zwart—showed off “Collect Yourshelf.” Taking on the role of librarians, players in this game worked to build the best “shelf” of library materials they could find, having to pull from each of Brown’s different libraries. A player’s shelf can only hold one item from each library, so it is important to think carefully about what to put on your shelf. The whole game is driven by action cards, which give instruction for what to do on your turn. To create various levels of interaction in “Collect Yourshelf,” the team created regular, intensified, and extreme action cards.

The Library appreciates all of the hard work that went into these games and looks forward to seeing what Brown students do in next year’s Innovation Prize.

Event | Pizza Nights

Pizza

It’s that time of year!

Pizza Nights are here!

Every semester the Library hosts two nights of pizza to fortify your studying. The first (Tuesday) night will be in the Sciences Library. The next night (Wednesday) there will be pizza in the Rock. Students that enjoy studying in a library as well as eating pizza are encouraged to attend.

Schedule
Tuesday, May 10  |  9 p.m.  | Friedman Center (SciLi)
Wednesday, May 11  |  9 p.m.  |  Rockefeller Library Lobby

This semester’s pizza nights are sponsored by the Library, Campus Life, and an ever true Brown Family.

Good luck with exams!

#pizzanight

Event | Terra Huber on “The Conservation of a 16th Century Papal Bull on Parchment”

during_verso

During preservation

During National Preservation Week on Friday, April 29, 2016 from 2 – 3 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Terra Huber, Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, will give a talk entitled, “The Conservation of a 16th Century Papal Bull on Parchment.” This event is free and open to the public.

After preservation

A papal bull is an official letter or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church, named after the bulla, or authenticating lead seal, affixed to the document. Papal bulls are handwritten on parchment, a historical writing surface prepared from animal skin that presents unique challenges to the conservator. This talk will focus on the history, materials, production, and conservation treatment of a papal bull from the collection of the Brown University Library. The Brown University Library’s papal bull is dated to 1580 and was issued by Pope Gregory XIII, the pope responsible for introducing the Gregorian calendar which we use today.

TLH_headshot

Terra Huber

Terra Huber has studied and worked in the field of conservation since 2009. She has worked as an Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center since 2015 and has completed internships at the Walters Art Museum, the Newberry Library, the Boston Athenaeum, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Terra earned a Master of Arts with a Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Tyler School of Arts of Temple University. She is a member of the American Institute for Conservation and the Guild of Book Workers.

Date: Friday, April 29, 2016
Time: 2 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | A History of the Brown University Orchestra

OrchestraPicA History of the Brown University Orchestra is now on display in the Orwig Music Library.

The exhibit chronicles the development of orchestral involvement on Brown’s campus from 1919 onward.  Highlights include programs from performances with Leonard Bernstein, Itzhak Perlman, and Steve Reich, as well as the merger of the Brown Orchestra and Pembroke Orchestra, which happened over 30 years before the two colleges formally joined together.

Dates: April 22 – October 1, 2016
TimeLibrary Hours
Location: Orwig Music Library, 1 Young Orchard Avenue, Providence

OrchestraPic2

Winners of the 2016 Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research

bookrainbow

The Brown University Library is pleased to announce the winners of the 2016 Undergraduate Prize for Excellence in Library Research. The Committee decided this year to award two prizes, both for projects that coincidentally were done for the same course, Michael Vorenberg’s first-year seminar, “Abraham Lincoln: Historical and Cultural Perspectives” (HIST 0551A).

Rachel Gold ‘19 wrote a paper on “The Education of John Hay,” for which she used a wide variety of contemporary sources, including John Hay’s own letters and papers, archival records, and other students’ diaries to describe John Hay’s experience at Brown and in Providence. She worked her way into these sources by first reading, chronologically, a series of biographies of Hay from 1905 through 2014. The result is an evocative portrait of the Midwesterner who found himself at Brown University in 1855.

Halley McArn ‘19 created a website that explores the issue of presidential pardons, with special reference to pardons issued by Lincoln during the Civil War, as well as a discussion of the issue in the Obama presidency. The website begins with the origins of the presidential pardon, then proceeds to Lincoln’s pardons and the special issues he had to consider, especially in the midst of a war that had torn the country apart. It ends with an overview of the presidential pardon up to and including Obama, with special reference to the context of the War on Drugs and mass incarceration, issues raised by this year’s First Readings choice: Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

The committee judging the awards this year consisted of:

  • Karen Bouchard (Library)
  • Harold J. Cook (History)
  • William S. Monroe (Library)
  • Joseph M. Pucci (Classics)
  • Besenia Rodriguez (Associate Dean of the College)

In partnership with the Office of the Dean of the College, the Brown University Library sponsors the annual Undergraduate Research Prize, awarded each April. The purpose of the prize is to recognize excellence in undergraduate research projects that make creative and extensive use of the Brown University Library’s collections including, but not limited to, print resources, databases, primary resources, and materials in all media. The project may take the form of a traditional paper, a database, a website, or other digital project. Please click here to visit the Prize’s webpage for more information.

Updates from Around the Library | April 2016

april2016Updates

With spring break behind us and finals on the way, here are a few updates from the Library:

The Gregory Corso Papers – the unpublished poetry of a Beat poet

Gregory Corso in a hotel room, circa 1983

Gregory Corso in a hotel room, circa 1983

The Gregory Corso papers, a collection of unpublished poetry, writings, photographs and original oil paintings, are now available for research at the John Hay Library.  They provide an intimate look into the complicated life and work of one of the most influential Beat poets of his generation.

Corso was born in 1930 in New York City.  His mother left the family when he was a year old and he spent his childhood enduring various orphanages, foster homes, reform schools, and on the streets.  At sixteen, he landed in jail for robbery and was sentenced to three years at the Clinton State Prison. During his stay there, he compensated for his lack of a traditional education by frequenting the prison library where he discovered the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Arthur Rimbaud, among others, and began writing his own poetry.

He met Allen Ginsberg at a bar in Greenwich Village in 1950, a chance encounter that precipitated what was to become a lasting personal and creative relationship. Ginsberg recognized Corso’s talent and the originality of his poetic voice. Through Ginsberg, Corso met and became friends with other writers in Ginsberg’s circle, including Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, and Neal Cassady, many of whom become not only influential in Corso’s artistic development, but leading figures in the Beat movement of that era.

A page in Notebook No.8 in the Corso papers.  The text reads: "2 very profound beings. Thinker. Poet."

A drawing by Corso in Notebook No.8. The text reads: “2 very profound beings. Thinker. Poet.”

The manuscripts and working notebooks that make up the bulk of the Gregory Corso papers include drafts for an unpublished book of poetry he titled “The Golden Dot.” His notebooks are full of reminiscences, musings about life, drafts for poems, and drawings. The manuscripts are supplemented by correspondence, paintings, photographs, and a small but interesting assortment of other materials, including phonograph records, VHS cassettes, books and ephemeral materials. The bulk of the collection dates from 1980 to 1983 when he was living in New York City and became friends with a poet named Laura Boss.

A letter in the collection from Laura Boss to Allen Ginsberg in January 1984  summed up her experience of Corso: “Gregory is the most charming and least charming man I have ever known. He can come closer to the truth than anyone…and the most outrageous liar I have ever met…”  Researchers are encouraged to visit the John Hay Library to utilize these previously unknown resources that document the life of an influential poet and writer.

Event | Tara Nummedal and Donna Bilak: “Tear the Books Apart: Atalanta fugiens in a Digital Age”

Atalanta emblem XI

On Thursday, April 21, 2016, at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, scholars Tara Nummedal and Donna Bilak will speak about their digital publication, Project Atalanta. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Recently chosen as one of two pilot projects for Brown’s Mellon-funded digital publishing initiative, Nummedal and Bilak’s publication will bring a multimedia seventeenth century text to life in digital form. The digital publication will produce a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of Michael Maier’s extraordinary text, Atalanta fugiens (1617/18). An alchemical emblem book, Maier’s Atalanta fugiens re-casts the myth of Atalanta—the fleet-footed virgin—as a series of fifty emblems that outline the creation of the philosopher’s stone. With its combination of text, image, and music, the Atalanta fugiens represents an early multimedia work. In Project Atalanta, this historic text will be represented in dynamic digital form and be accompanied by newly written scholarship that will help elucidate the Atalanta fugiens’ many layers. 

In this lunchtime talk, Nummedal and Bilak will discuss their work-in-progress, share insight into the world of seventeenth century emblem culture, and help build a foundation for an open dialogue about the processes, opportunities, and challenges of producing digitally rich scholarly products. 

myofficialphoto cropped

Tara Nummedal

Tara Nummedal is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department. She is the author of Alchemy and Authority in the Holy Roman Empire and is currently completing her second book, “The Lion’s Blood: Alchemy, Gender, and Apocalypse in Reformation Germany.” Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and, most recently, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She is Past President of the New England Renaissance Conference and a member of the editorial board of the journal Ambix. She teaches courses in early modern European history and the history of science.

DB_BW

Donna Bilak

Donna Bilak is a lecturer at Columbia University in New York. Her research interests encompass early modern European history of science and alchemy, early modern emblem culture, as well as 19th-century jewelry history and technology. Dr. Bilak’s doctoral research reconstructed the life and times of a 17th-century Puritan alchemist who operated in England and America, and she was the 2013-14 Edelstein Postdoctoral Fellow at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia where her research focused on analysis of the Atalanta fugiens(1618), an alchemical emblem book that encodes laboratory technologies using music and images. Dr. Bilak has lectured extensively on the topics of early modern alchemy as well as jewelry history throughout North America and Europe​.

Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Annual Yoken Lecture: Timothy Mooney’s Molière Than Thou

tartuffethumb

Timothy Mooney as Tartuffe

Actor and author Timothy Mooney will deliver the Annual Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series Lecture on Monday, April 11 at 4 p.m. in Carmichael Auditorium at 85 Waterman Street (BERT Building). For the lecture, Mooney will reprise his one-man play, Molière Than Thou, in which he explores some of Molière’s most humorous speeches.

Molière Than Thou finds Molière left without a cast when all of his fellow performers happen to consume “the same sort of shellfish” at one of the local public inns. Rather than refund the box office income, Molière offers to perform a “greatest hits” of sorts, and leads the audience, which occasionally participates, through a hilarious succession of favorite speeches that trace his illustrious career. Plays represented include Tartuffe, Don Juan, The Doctor In Spite of Himself, The Precious Young Maidens, The Misanthrope, and The School for Wives. Throughout, “Molière” will explain his working process.

mooneytimh1Timothy Mooney is the author of The Big Book of Molière Monologues and the textbook Acting at the Speed of Life. He has adapted Shakespeare in Breakneck Hamlet and Shakespeare’s Histories: Ten Epic Plays at a Breakneck Pace! During the past fifteen years, Tim has performed Molière Than Thou over 500 times. He is the former founder and editor of The Script Review and the former Artistic Director of Chicago’s Stage Two Theatre, where he produced nearly fifty plays in five years, including seventeen iambic pentameter variations of Molière’s plays, which have been produced over 150 times around the world. His Doctor in Spite of Himself took third place in the Scottish Community Drama Association National Festival.

Date: Monday, April 11, 2016
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: Carmichael Auditorium, 85 Waterman Street, Providence

Parking information:

Metered street parking is available on Waterman Street and surrounding streets. Off-street parking is available to visitors in Lot 68 Upper, Power Street Parking Garage, 111 Power Street.  View Map (Entrance located at the intersection of Power and Thayer Streets.) Lot 68 is a significant walking distance from 85 Waterman Street. We recommend arriving early to find close on-street parking.

Event | On the Material Trail: Embedded Librarianship in the Heart of Tuscany

esposizione_lineapelle_2

4th International Creative Competition for New Designer Makers, Milan, Italy, February 2016

In 2015, Mark Pompelia, the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Visual + Material Resource Librarian, accompanied a double-major RISD student (Apparel Design-Industrial Design) on an international exhibition program called Craft the Leather. Based in the Tuscan Leather District of San Miniato, Italy, the program hosted ten schools for a weeklong immersion into the industry of vegetable-tanned leather making, which is both centuries old and full of modern innovation.

On Monday, April 18, 2016 at 4 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Mark will explain how the week served to launch each student on an artistic journey to craft a line of works based on the sites visited, lessons learned, and the inherent qualities of the supplied leathers. Produced over summer 2015 in direct consultation with the Material Librarian, the works were collected in a curated exhibition launched at a February 2016 international exposition in Milan.

Mark Pompelia

Mark Pompelia, Visual + Material Resource Librarian, Fleet Library, RISD

Mark Pompelia has been Visual + Material Resource Librarian in the Fleet Library at RISD since 2010. He oversees its non-text collections to include still and moving images in analog and digital formats, including film and video, slides and photographs, half a million picture clippings, 21-million digital images via subscription, and more, in addition to one of the largest material samples collection in the country. He is the administrator for Artstor Shared Shelf and the newly launched Digital Commons @ RISD institutional repository.

Date: Monday, April 18, 2016
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence