Event | New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation

panel poster 1000.ursa-feature-image

On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in Pembroke Hall, three academic publishing professionals will participate in a panel discussion entitled, “New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation.” This lecture series is intended to engage Brown faculty and students in a conversation about changes in the field of scholarly communication in the twenty-first century and will complement the University’s initiative for digital scholarship, which was recently awarded a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

The panelists:

  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communications and managing editor of PMLA
  • Alison Mudditt, Director of the University of California Press
  • Tara McPherson, Founding Editor of Vectors, and creator of the new authoring platform, Scalar

The discussion will focus on the history and evolution of scholarly publishing, innovative publishing platforms, and how university presses can adapt to meet the needs of multimodal scholarship while continuing to provide the rigorous review processes that meet the needs of the scholarly community.

This lecture series is co-sponsored by the Brown University Library and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

Abstracts

Kathleen Fitzpatrick:
Focus will be on the MLA’s platforms for supporting new forms of scholarly communication, including the Commons and CORE, as well as MLA’s guidelines for evaluating digital scholarship for tenure and promotion.

Alison Mudditt:
Scholarly communication is increasingly in flux as the academic community, scholarly organizations and research funders question whether traditional publishing models and norms are still appropriate in an increasingly open and digital age. As a vitally important and distinctive vehicle for communication in the humanities, how can monographs not only be preserved but also reinvigorated as we move towards open, digital models? Open access has enormous potential to increase the reach and impact of scholarship, but it will have disruptive effects on established norms, and raises some key questions – especially in disciplines deeply invested in the slow forms of knowledge-making represented by the monograph. Speaker will address the barriers, sensitivities and practical challenges surrounding open access monographs, and about the ways in which UC Press is addressing them via its innovative Luminos program (www.luminosoa.org).

Tara McPherson:
What are the particular affordances of the digital for scholarly knowledge production today? How might we imagine scholarship differently if we move beyond a focus on text toward multimodal expression and design? What audiences might such work reach? This talk will explore how we might envision scholarship along multiple scales and in varied formats, paying particular attention to the ways in which scholarly evidence might be engaged anew through the possibilities of the digital archive. By taking up the specific case of the online platform Scalar, the speaker will approach these questions through concrete examples of digital scholarship today.

Bios

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association, where she serves as Managing Editor of PMLA and other MLA publications. She also holds an appointment as Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing.

Alison Mudditt

Alison Mudditt

Alison Mudditt has been Director of University of California Press since 2011, where she has focused on reshaping the Press’s strategy and structure to meet the needs of its diverse audiences in the digital age. Alison has twenty-five years experience in scholarly publishing which began at Blackwell in Oxford, UK, where she rose to become Publisher for the Humanities Division. In 1997, Alison moved to Taylor & Francis Inc. in Philadelphia as Publishing Director of the Behavioral Sciences Division. Alison joined SAGE in 2001 as Vice President and Editorial Director, and was appointed Executive Vice President in 2004 where she led the SAGE’s publishing programs across books, journals and digital during a period of tremendous growth. Alison is a regular speaker at industry meetings and is currently Vice Chair of the Scientific Publications Committee and member of the Open Science Committee of the American Heart Association, and member of the Board of Directors of K|N Consultants. She has also served on the Executive Council of the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the American Association of Publishers, and was Co-Chair of the Dean’s Leadership Council at California State University, Channel Islands.

TaraMcPherson

Tara McPherson

Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts and Director of the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Studies. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research engages the cultural dimensions of media, including the intersection of gender, race, affect and place. She has a particular interest in digital media. Here, her research focuses on the digital humanities, early software histories, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.

She is author of the award-winning Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Duke UP: 2003), co-editor of Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Duke UP: 2003) and of Transmedia Frictions: The Digital, The Arts + the Humanities (California, 2014), and editor of Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected, part of the MacArthur Foundation series on Digital Media and Learning (MIT Press, 2008.) She is currently completing a monograph about her lab’s work and process, Designing for Difference, for Harvard University Press. She is the Founding Editor of Vectors, www.vectorsjournal.org, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press, and is a founding editor of the MacArthur-supported International Journal of Learning and Media (launched by MIT Press in 2009.) She is the lead PI on the new authoring platform, Scalar, and for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, http://scalar.usc.edu/. Her research has been funded by the Mellon, Ford, Annenberg, and MacArthur Foundations, as well as by the NEH.

Date: March 21, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: The Cogut Center for the Humanities, Pembroke Hall, 172 Meeting Street, Providence

Wilmeth Lecture & Exhibit | “Actors and Other Monsters: Graphic Satire As Blood Sport, 1789–1830” with Joseph Roach

Crowding to the Pit

“Crowding to the Pit,” print by Theodore Lane, 1821 (after Robert Dighton).

On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 7 p.m. at the John Hay Library, Joseph Roach, the Sterling Professor of Theater at Yale University, will deliver the 12th Annual Don Wilmeth Endowed Lectureship in Theatre and Entertainment entitled, “Actors and Other Monsters: Graphic Satire As Blood Sport, 1789–1830.” The lecture is complemented by an exhibit curated by Professor Wilmeth.

This event is free and open to the public.

Lecture

Attendees will discover how monstrosity thrives in the golden age of graphic satire, and how few monsters of caricature surpass actors for appearing not only with warts and all, but also as all warts. Politicians do rival them in ridicule, however—as fat as Richard Brinsley Sheridan (himself a politician as well as a playwright), as cadaverous as John Philip Kemble, or as Lilliputian as child star Master Betty—convened alike by John Bull as butts of national laughter in a Parliament of freaks.

Exhibit

Accompanying the lecture is a special exhibit curated by Prof. Wilmeth on “The Golden Age of British Theatre Caricature” with dozens of examples of prints—etchings, engravings and other popular visual forms depicting popular theatre during the late Georgian and early Regency periods in Great Britain. Among the artists represented in the exhibit are Robert Dighton, James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, the Cruikshank family, Samuel de Wilde, and others who entertained the public with their satiric magic on paper, highlighted by several special events during this period (the young acting prodigy Master Betty, the Old Price riots at Covent Garden Theatre, and the actor Edmund Kean’s scandalous escapades, among others). In general, these delightful visual pieces serve as instruments of journalistic ego deflation of these subjects. This exhibit is installed in the Willis Reading Room cases and in the Lownes Room cases. Please ask at the front desk for access to the Lownes Room.

Professor Joseph Roach

RoachA theatre historian, stage director, and performance studies scholar, Joseph Roach is the author of The Player’s Passion: Studies in the Science of Acting (1985), Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance (1996) and It (2007). He is the editor (with Janelle Reinelt) of Critical Theory and Performance (2ndedition, revised 2007) and Changing the Subject: Marvin Carlson and Theatre Studies, 1959-2009 (2009). His publications have been recognized by the James Russell Lowell Prize from the Modern Language Association, the Barnard Hewitt Award in Theatre History, and the Joe E. Calloway Prize for Drama.  Before coming to Yale, he chaired the Department of Performing Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre at Northwestern University, and the Department of Performance Studies in the Tisch School of Arts at NYU. He is the recipient of a Lifetime Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Society for Theatre Research and a Distinguished Achievement Award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which funds the World Performance Project at Yale. In 2009, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Warwick (UK) and the Fletcher Jones Distinguished Fellowship from the Huntington Library.

Date: March 21, 2016
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

"Opinions respecting the Young Roscious (Master Better)," engraving by Thomas Rowlandson, London, 1804.

“Opinions respecting the Young Roscious (Master Better),” engraving by Thomas Rowlandson, London, 1804.

New Eresource: Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century

homeThumb_civilRights

Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century consists of four modules: two modules of Federal Government Records, and two modules of Organizational Records and Personal Papers, offering unique documentation and a variety of perspectives on the 20th-century fight for freedom. Major collections in these modules include Civil Rights records from the Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush presidencies; the Martin Luther King FBI File and FBI Files on locations of major civil rights demonstrations like Montgomery and Selma, Alabama or St. Augustine, Florida; and the records of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC), Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE).

Brown in the Great War

WarMemorial
A new digital resource that highlights materials from the University Archives and Special Collections is now available: “Brown in the Great War.”

The website focuses on Brown community members who participated in, fought, and died in World War I, as well as the social landscape of Brown from 1914 to 1921. This eloquent resource was researched and developed by Robin Wheelwright Ness (Senior Library Specialist, John Hay Library) for a practicum requirement towards her master’s degree in Public Humanities. 

As part of a second practicum, Robin is compiling a list that will reflect the John Hay Library’s primary resources pertaining to World War I. Additional University Archives and Special Collections material can be found through subject guides, Collections A to Z, or the online Library catalog (Josiah).

For more information please contact Jennifer Betts, University Archivist, at jennifer_betts@brown.edu.

Updates from Around the Library | March 2016

2016marchUpdatesFromAroundTheLibrary

With spring break right around the corner, here are a few updates from the Library:

Pilot Projects Selected for Brown’s Digital Publishing Initiative

The Dean of the Faculty and the Brown University Library are pleased to announce the selection of two faculty-led projects for the inaugural year of the University’s Digital Publishing Initiative. Supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Digital Publishing Initiative offers Brown faculty members the opportunity to explore new and innovative approaches to scholarly publishing and research. Produced through new partnerships between scholars and digital scholarship staff, these two pilot projects will be conceived and constructed over the next several years, leading ultimately to pioneering, interactive publications on the web.

MRiva

Massimo Riva, Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence and Professor of Italian Studies, Chair of Italian Studies

Written by Brown University’s leading Italian Studies scholar Massimo RivaItalian Shadows: Casanova’s Polemoscope and Other Tales of Imaginary or Forgotten Media conceives of an archaeology of virtual reality. Through focusing on four curious pieces of analog media from the pre-digital age—including Casanova’s voyeuristic polemoscope (or jealousy glass); an eighteenth century peep show box, the Mondo Novo; the Great Belzoni’s Aggrescopius, an enhancement of magic lantern theater; and the travelling panorama—Riva will draw connections between old forms of reality-altering technologies and today’s virtual world. Taking advantage of the capabilities of the web, Italian Shadows will include rich, interactive illustrations that capture the effects of these long forgotten optical tools and cut a hypertextual path across a variety of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century mediascapes. Mining the past for examples of “imaginary” technologies that provided a conduit for alternative imaginings, this study examines the complex relationship between technological innovations and the cultural imagination.

myofficialphoto cropped

Tara Nummedal, Associate Professor of History, Associate Professor of Italian Studies

The other pilot project is a collaboration between Brown University’s Tara Nummedal and Columbia University’s Donna Bilak. Combining the format of the scholarly edition with that of a critical anthology, Nummedal and Bilak’s Project Atalanta will bring a multimedia seventeenth century text to life in digital form. The digital publication will produce a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of Michael Maier’s extraordinary text, Atalanta Fugiens (1617/18). An alchemical emblem book, Maier’s Atalanta fugiens re-casts the myth of Atalanta—the fleet-footed virgin—as a series of fifty emblems that outline the creation of the philosopher’s stone. With its combination of text, image, and music, the Atalanta fugiens represents an early multimedia work. In Project Atalanta, this historic text will be represented in dynamic digital form and be accompanied by newly written scholarship that will help elucidate the Atalanta fugiens’ many layers.

These proposals by were selected by the Digital Publications Advisory Board, which is made up of Brown faculty members and administrators reflecting a broad range of disciplines, interests, and areas of expertise. These proposals were selected not only for their scholarly promise, but also for their innovative approaches to digital forms of research and presentation.

The Digital Publishing Initiative is a joint project of Brown’s Office of the Dean of the Faculty and the Brown University Library. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, this Initiative aims to extend the University’s mission in supporting scholarship of its faculty through engagement with new and emerging forms of digital publication. Each year for the duration of the grant, faculty members at the University will be invited to submit proposals for digital publication projects to be made in partnership with members of Brown’s Center for Digital Scholarship, which provides design and editorial support, and technical expertise.

In April, 2016, Professors Riva and Nummedal will speak in the Brown University Library about their Mellon-supported digital projects. The exact date and location of this talk will be announced soon. Later this spring there will be a new call for proposals issued to the Brown community, with proposals to be evaluated in the 2016 fall semester. For more information about the Digital Publishing Initiative, please contact the Digital Scholarship Editor, Liz Glass at elizabeth_glass@brown.edu.

The Digital Publications Advisory Board Members for 2015-2016:

  • Michael Satlow, Chair
  • Thalia Field
  • Harold Cook
  • Leslie Bostrom
  • Steven Lubar
  • Courtney Martin

Ex-Officio Members:

  • Kevin McLaughlin, Dean of the Faculty
  • Joseph Meisel, Deputy Provost
  • Harriette Hemmasi, University Librarian
  • Liz Glass, Digital Scholarship Editor

Event | Roger Schonfeld Talk on Libraries and Scholarly Practices

sr_roger2-306x255-c-defaultOn Tuesday, March 8 from 12 – 1:30 p.m. in the DSL, Roger Schonfeld, director of Ithaka S+R’s Libraries and Scholarly Communication Program, will give a talk about his work with libraries and scholarly practices. A light lunch will be served.

In his role as director, Roger leads Ithaka S+R’s studies of academics’ and students’ attitudes, practices, and needs, as well research on the changing role of the academic library, scholarly publisher, and learned society. He also consults with libraries and library consortia, digital humanities projects, distinctive collections and centers of excellence, and scholarly publishers.

Roger has served on the NSF Blue Ribbon Task Force for Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access and NISO’s Open Discovery Initiative. Earlier, he was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, where he worked on projects related to college athletics and scholarly communication. Roger has a degree in English Literature from Yale University.

Key projects at Ithaka S+R that Roger has led include the Ithaka S+R Faculty Survey; projects on the changing research methods and practices of faculty members in fields such as history and chemistry; studies of the impact and sustainability of courseware initiatives; the Ithaka S+R Library Survey of deans and directors; a number of projects on library strategy, economics, and collections analysis, with a particular emphasis on digitization, management, and preservation of library collections.

Date: March 8, 2016
Time: 12 – 1:30 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Celebrate the New Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio with Open Studios

digital-studio_homepage-banner_v1

Join the Brown University Library for “Open Studios” on Friday, March 11, 2016, to celebrate the opening of the new Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, located on the first floor of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library.

Stop by anytime between 2 – 5 p.m. to learn how you can use the new studio. Tour the spaces and equipment. See examples of cutting edge digital scholarship from around the Brown campus and beyond. Meet members of the Center for Digital Scholarship and see brief demonstrations of the workshops they teach throughout the semester.

All are welcome. Cookies, coffee, and tea will be served. See you there!

Date: Friday, March 11, 2016
Time: 2 – 5 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | A President Lincoln Hackathon with Parlor Monuments to the Illustrious Dead

lincoln hack

In honor of the 155th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s first inauguration, join us in the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio for a 3D hackathon at noon on March 4, 2016.

We’ll use a 3D scanner and other tools to study “Parlor Monuments to the Illustrious Dead,” a 19th century Lego-like children’s game about the Civil War. The game’s instructions are lost: can we recreate them and remix the parts, and how can the digital technologies help us?

We will be joined by Holly Snyder, Curator of American Historical Collections at the John Hay Library.

Date: Friday, March 4, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

lincoln cubes

Carberry Day | Leap Year

carphoto

The Brown University Library celebrates Josiah S. Carberry Day every February 29, occurring only in a leap year.

In celebration, there will be fresh fruit and cookies available in the lobby at the Rockefeller Library and the Friedman Center at the Sciences Library.

Consider leaving your loose change in a Brown jug (AKA “cracked pot”). The jugs will be out near the fruit and cookies. All donations go toward the Carberry Fund.

Known to show up unannounced in unlikely places, Carberry has been seen but never verified on campus. Will you spot the elusive man himself? If you do, try to capture him with a photo and share on Twitter or Instagram with #JosiahCarberry.

To share on Facebook, friend Josiah Carberry and tag him in the photo.

Happy Josiah S. Carberry Day!