Spotlight On: Digital National Security Archive (DNSA)

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The Library subscribes to many of the databases included in the Digital National Security Archive.

Afghanistan: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1973–1990
Argentina, 1975-1980: The Making of U.S. Human Rights
The Berlin Crisis, 1958–1962
Chile and the United States: U.S. Policy toward Democracy, Dictatorship, and Human Rights, 1970–1990
China and the United States: From Hostility to Engagement, 1960–1998
CIA Family Jewels Indexed
Colombia and the United States: Political Violence, Narcotics, and Human Rights, 1948-2010
The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962
The Cuban Missile Crisis: 50th Anniversary
The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: An International Collection, From Bay of Pigs to Nuclear Brink
Death Squads, Guerrilla War, Covert Ops, and Genocide: Guatemala and the United States, 1954-1999
El Salvador: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1977–1984
El Salvador: War, Peace, and Human Rights, 1980–1994
Iran: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1977–1980
The Iran-Contra Affair: The Making of a Scandal, 1983–1988
Iraqgate: Saddam Hussein, U.S. Policy and the Prelude to the Persian Gulf War, 1980–1994
Japan and the United States: Diplomatic, Security, and Economic Relations, 1960–1976
Japan and the United States: Diplomatic, Security, and Economic Relations, Part III, 1961-2000
The Kissinger Telephone Conversations: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969-1977
The Kissinger Transcripts: A Verbatim Record of U.S. Diplomacy, 1969-1977
The National Security Agency: Organization and Operations, 1945-2009
Nicaragua: The Making of U.S. Policy, 1978–1990
Peru: Human Rights, Drugs, and Democracy, 1980-2000
The Philippines: U.S. Policy During the Marcos Years, 1965–1986information
Presidential Directives on National Security, Part I: From Truman to Clinton
Presidential Directives on National Security, Part II: From Truman to George W. Bush
The Soviet Estimate: U.S. Analysis of the Soviet Union, 1947–1991
U.S. Espionage and Intelligence, 1947–1996
U.S. Intelligence and China: Collection, Analysis and Covert Action
The U.S. Intelligence Community: Organization, Operations, and Management, 1947–1989
The U.S. Intelligence Community After 9/11
U.S. Intelligence on Weapons of Mass Destruction: From World War II to Iraq
U.S. Military Uses of Space, 1945–1991
U.S. Nuclear History: Nuclear Arms and Politics in the Missile Age, 1955–1968
U.S. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Policy, 1945–1991
U.S. Policy in the Vietnam War, Part I: 1954-1968
U.S. Policy in the Vietnam War, Part II: 1969-1975
The United States and the Two Koreas (1969-2000)

Talk and Open House | Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio

Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio

All are invited to tour the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio in the Rockefeller Library during Family Weekend on Saturday, October 22, 2016 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

The new Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, which opened in May of this year, was built to encourage students, faculty, and staff to engage in innovative forms and methods of digital scholarship using facilities that include a video and audio production suite, large format printer, a 3D scanner, and a full-color 3D printer.

3D model of optic neurons

3D model of optic neurons

Students, faculty, and staff have already printed 3D models of optic neurons and the interior of the Sistine Chapel, recorded interviews and podcasts, shot video lectures, and printed original digital art.

During the open house on October 22, several members of the Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship will showcase these technologies, along with several other examples of projects developed in collaboration with Brown students and faculty that employ such approaches as computational text analysis, data visualization, and GIS.

Come by for a tour and talk and see what libraries have been up to lately! 

3D model of the Sistine Chapel interior

3D model of the Sistine Chapel interior

For more information, see the websites for the Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio and the Brown University Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship.

Date: Saturday, October 22, 2016
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Location: Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Stephen Mopope Paintings

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A chance discovery returns the color and life to indigenous paintings

Ninety years ago, in 1926, a small group of traditional artists from the Kiowa nation—Spencer Asah, James Auchiah, Jack Hokeah, Stephen Mopope, Lois Smoky and Monroe Tsatoke—entered the University of Oklahoma to participate in a specialized art program designed to encourage their development and promote their work. Later known as the “Kiowa Five,” these artists made their international debut in 1928 at the First International Art Exposition in Prague, and were soon showing their work in other countries. Their exhibition at the Venice Biennial in 1932 was noted, according to author and art teacher Dorothy Dunn, as “the most popular exhibit among all the rich and varied displays assembled” there.  In 1929, a portfolio of pouchoir (stencil) prints was created by a fine arts publisher in Nice, France under the title Kiowa Indian Art, which helped bring their art to a wider audience.

The eldest and most prolific of this small group of Kiowa artists was Stephen Mopope (Qued Koi, or Painted Robe), grandson of the warrior Appiatan and grand nephew of the artists Haungooah (Silver Horn) and Oheltoint.  Mopope was 28 when he arrived at the University of Oklahoma, but his work as an artist had been nurtured from a very young age. His great uncle, Haungooah, recognized his talent and taught him traditional techniques. Later, at the St. Patrick’s Mission School in Anandarko, his art teacher, Sister Olivia Taylor (Choctaw), further supported his artistic development. Mopope’s art portrays the traditional dance, music, and ceremonies of the Kiowa people, reflecting the world in which he lived. He was a skilled practitioner of many elements of traditional culture, including flute-playing, ceremonial dance, and farming, all of which became ongoing subjects of his paintings. In 1939, Mopope received a commission to paint the mural “Ceremonial Dance” for the Department of the Interior’s Udall Building, where it is still viewable today, as part of a New Deal agency project.

A few years ago, while going through some old boxes in the stacks of the John Hay Library, a staff member came across seven of Mopope’s original paintings in an old print collection. Their bold colors and unique subjects popped out even through layers of dust and grime. How Brown University acquired these paintings is not recorded, but they were recently cleaned and restored. Please come see the remarkable beauty and spiritual presence for yourself. A selection of four of these paintings will be on view on the second floor of the John Hay Library until the end of November 2016 in honor of Indigenous People’s Day.

Dates: October 14 – November 30, 2016
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Dedication of the Wernig Graduate Student Reading Room

Rockefeller 2nd Floor Grad Space

On Saturday, October 29, 2016 at 4 p.m., the Vincent J. Wernig Graduate Student Reading Room will be formally opened and dedicated. The Brown University Library welcomes all graduate students to attend the event, which will include remarks from President Paxson and a cocktail reception.

The Sorensen Family (Joan Wernig Sorensen ’72, E. Paul Sorensen ’71, ScM’75, PhD’77, Alice A. Sorensen ’06, Christian P. Sorensen ’06) generously funded the Reading Room in honor of Joan’s late father, Vincent J. Wernig P’71, P’72, P’79, P’82, GP’06, GP’06, who was Assistant to the Chairman, Emeritus, and Executive Officer, Emeritus, in the Department of Chemistry at Brown.

Please join us in celebrating this transformational gift to Brown.

Date: Saturday, October 29, 2016
Time: 4 – 6:30 p.m.
Location: Vincent J. Wernig Graduate Student Reading Room, Second Floor, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Rockefeller 2nd Floor Grad Space

HEIN Online Government, Politics, and Law on Trial until March 2017

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1754-present; HeinOnline’s Government, Politics & Law contains more than 80 million pages of content across 80,000 titles and 195,000 volumes. HeinOnline bridges the gap in history by providing comprehensive coverage from inception of more than 2,300 periodicals. In addition to its vast collection of journals, the database also contains the Congressional Record bound volumes in entirety, complete coverage of the U.S. Reports back to 1754, constitutions for every country in the world, classic books from the 18th & 19th centuries, all United States Treaties, the Federal Register and CFR from inception, and much more!

This trial expires on March 15, 2017. If HeinOnline is something that you would like to see the Library subscribe to more permanently, please send feedback to Anne_Nolan@brown.edu.

The Library Welcomes Mary Murphy

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The Library welcomes Mary Murphy, the new Pembroke Center Archivist.

For several years Mary was a Manuscripts Archivist and, more recently, the Administrative Librarian at Harvard University’s Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America.

Her prior professional experience includes working at the Boston Redevelopment Authority and the Georgia Historical Society.

Mary’s undergraduate degree is in History from Beloit College.  She completed her MFA in historic preservation at Savannah College of Art & Design and her MLIS in Archives Management at Simmons College.

Since moving to Providence, Mary has fallen in love with Narragansett Bay and is now the proud owner of the tiniest boat at Fox Point Marina!

The Library Welcomes Hector Correa

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Hector Correa joined the Library in June as the Senior Library Applications Developer. Prior to Brown, Hector was at Penn State working on the ScholarSphere project, a Ruby on Rails application built on top of the Hydra framework, which uses Fedora for document storage and Blacklight/Solr to power the search feature.

From 2010-2014 he was a senior developer at AccuWeather where he led the teams that develop the AccuWeather.com web site and AccuWeather core API which provides weather data to external partners and internal applications.

Hector has a B.S in Computer Science from the Colima Institute of Technology in Mexico. He brings over fifteen years of software development experience to Brown.

Hector says, “I am really excited with this opportunity and the chance to work closely with the people at the library.”

Updates from Around the Library | October 2016

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As the new semester continues, here are a few updates from the Library:

Event | In the Mountains of Madness: A Reading with Author W. Scott Poole

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On Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, W. Scott Poole will give a reading from his new book, In the Mountains of Madness: The Life and Extraordinary Afterlife of H. P. Lovecraft. A discussion will follow the reading. This event is free and open to the public. The book will be available for purchase before and after the event.

IN THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS (SEPTEMBER 2016, 978-1-59376-674-4)

In the Mountains of Madness interweaves the biography of the legendary writer with an exploration of Lovecraft as a phenomenon. It aims to explain this reclusive figure while also challenging some of the general views held by Lovecraft devotees, focusing specifically on the large cross-section of horror and science fiction fans who know Lovecraft through films, Role Playing Games, and video games directly influenced by his work, but who know little or nothing about him.

From a childhood wracked with fear and intense hallucinations, Lovecraft would eventually embrace the mystical, creating ways in which his unrestrained imaginary life intersected with the world he found so difficult to endure. The monsters of his dreams became his muses. Yet, Poole insists that Lovecraft was not the Victorian prude who wrote “squishy monster stories for boys.” Rather he was a kind of neo-romantic mystic whose love of the 18th century allowed him to bring together a bit of Isaac Newton with a bit of William Blake in a real marriage of heaven and hell.

More than a traditional biography, In the Mountains of Madness places Lovecraft and his work in a cultural context, as an artist more in tune with our time than his own. Much of the literary work on Lovecraft tries to place him in relation to Poe or M.R. James or Arthur Machen; these ideas have little meaning for most contemporary readers. In his provocative new book, Poole reclaims the true essence of Lovecraft in relation to the comics of Joe Lansdale, the novels of Stephen King, and some of the biggest blockbuster films in contemporary America, proving the undying influence of this rare and significant figure.

About W. Scott Poole

Poole, scott (c) Leslie McKellar (1)W. Scott Poole, who teaches at the College of Charleston, has written widely about American history, horror, and pop culture. His books include Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror and his award-winning history Monsters in America, which received the John G. Cawelti prize from the Popular Culture Association and was named among the “Best of the Best” by the AAUP for 2011. Poole is a regular contributor to Popmatters and his work has appeared in the Huffington Post, Religion Dispatches, and Killing the Buddha.

Date: Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Film Screening | DEFYING THE NAZIS: THE SHARPS’ WAR | A New Film by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky

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On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 8 p.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab in the Rockefeller Library, the Brown University Library will screen Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War, a new documentary by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky.

At 6 p.m. on the same night, the corresponding exhibit, A Hymn for the Brave: the Sharps and Humanitarian Work in World War II, will open with a reception at the John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Streeet, Providence. Martha Sharp Joukowsky, Ph.D.’58 PhB’82 LHD’85 P’87 GP’13 GP’14 GP’17, daughter of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, will speak at the reception.

Both events are free and open to the public.

The 90-minute film tells the story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, a Unitarian minister and his wife from Wellesley, Massachusetts, who left their children behind in the care of their parish and boldly committed to multiple life-threatening rescue missions in Europe, before and after the start of World War II. Over two dangerous years, they helped to save hundreds of imperiled political dissidents and Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazi occupation across Europe. Martha Dickie Sharp is a Brown alumna, Pembroke class of 1926.

Click here to view the trailer.

The story is cinematically told through the letters and journals of the Sharps, with Tom Hanks as the voice of Waitstill and Marina Goldman as the voice of Martha. It features firsthand interviews with the now adult children whom the Sharps saved, as well as leading historians, authors, and Holocaust scholars, including William Schulz, Deborah Dwork, Modecai Paldiel, Ghanda DiFiglia, and Yehuda Bauer.

“The story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp is one of the most incredible tales of compassion, sacrifice and heroism that I have ever heard, and I was completely unaware of it until five years ago when Artemis Joukowsky first shared it with me,” said Ken Burns. “Nearly three years before America as a nation became involved in the Second World War, these two unassuming, so-called ‘ordinary’ Americans gave up everything they knew and loved and risked their lives to become involved in a war 4,000 miles away because they knew there were people in grave danger who needed help.”

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Rev. Waitstill and Martha Sharp leading adults and children to an airplane in Czechoslovakia, 1939.

Artemis Joukowsky, a film producer and co-founder of No Limits Media, is the grandson of Waitstill and Martha Sharp and has spent decades researching their story. He is the author of a companion book to the film, featuring a foreword by Ken Burns, which was published by Beacon Press.

“Beyond the cloak-and-dagger suspense of my grandparents’ experience, it is a story of what America meant to refugees fleeing war-torn countries to build new lives. And it underscores what Waitstill would call ‘a collaborative effort’ of how a small but effective underground network of rescue workers saved as many lives as they could, and how important that lesson is for what is happening today,” said Joukowsky.

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This group is part of the Children’s Emigration Project of the Unitarian Service Committee in France, organized by Martha Sharp (standing back row, 3rd from left). The Diamant triplets are in the front row. Caption in scrapbook states: “Children’s Emigration, Six Nationalities from France, Dec 1940”

In January of 1939, as Americans remained mostly detached from news reports of the growing refugee crisis in the escalating war in Europe, Waitstill received a call from the Rev. Everett Baker, Vice President of the American Unitarian Association, asking if they would travel to Czechoslovakia to help provide relief to people trying to escape Nazi persecution. He invited Waitstill and Martha to take part in “the first intervention against evil by the denomination to be started immediately overseas.” The mission would involve secretly helping Jews, refugees, and dissidents to escape the expanding Nazi threat in Europe. If they were discovered, they would face imprisonment, probable torture, and death. Seventeen other members of the church had declined. With two young children at home, the Sharps accepted. They expected to be gone for several months.

Instead, their mission would last almost two years.

During this time, the Sharps would face harrowing encounters with Nazi police, narrowly escape arrest, and watch as the Third Reich invaded Eastern Europe. Their marriage would be tested severely and the two children they left behind would be saddened by their parents’ absence. But dozens of Jewish scientists, journalists, doctors, powerful anti-Nazi activists, and children would find their way to freedom and start new lives as a result of their efforts. To recognize their heroic sacrifice, Martha and Waitstill were honored at Yad Vashem in Israel and declared “Righteous Among the Nations.” Of the thousands so honored, there are only five Americans, including the Sharps.

“The Sharps’ early grasp of the true nature of the Nazi threat and their willingness to leave the safety of America and take action to help endangered refugees was a rare act at a time of widespread indifference,” said Sara J. Bloomfield, director, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. “Their courage and sacrifice should inspire us to reflect deeply on our own responsibilities in a world that also faces many challenges.”

In conjunction with the broadcast on September 20, a wide range of organizations will participate in community outreach and engagement activities, creating screening events and conversations that focus on what it means to be “righteous,” both as it relates to the Holocaust and genocide across the globe today. These include The United States Memorial Holocaust Museum, Hillel House, The Anti-Defamation League, The Unitarian Universalist Association, The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, Jewish Community Centers, The Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Keene State College, Brown University, Harvard University, No Limits Media and others (a full list is available at DefyingtheNazis.org). Both the Brown University Library and the Brown/RISD Hillel are hosting screenings.

Click here for more information about PBS broadcast.

In addition, WETA, the presenting public television station for Defying the Nazis, has partnered with Facing History and Ourselves, one of the world’s most respected educational organizations. FHAO is dedicated to raising students’ awareness of injustice and intolerance. Together WETA and FHAO are creating curriculum materials to help middle and high school teachers use the film and additional primary sources to engage students in the Sharps’ story of sacrifice, rescue, and moral courage. Materials will be available free to schools through PBS’ LearningMedia Services.

Funding is provided by members of The Better Angels Society including Jan and Rick Cohen and Jonathan and Jeannie Lavine; The Starr Foundation; The Threshold Foundation; and donations from individuals.

Defying the Nazis: the Sharps’ War is a co-production of NO LIMITS MEDIA, Inc., and Florentine Films, in association with WETA Washington, D.C. A film by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky. Produced by Ken Burns and Matthew Justus, Ken Burns: Executive Producer. Edited by Erik Angra. Music by Sheldon Mirowitz. Copyright: Farm Pond Pictures, LLC.

Date: September 20, 2016
Time: 6:30 p.m. (Exhibit Opening) and 8 p.m. (Film Screening)
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence