UPDATE 5/1: LexisNexis is Working!!

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We apologize for the inconvenience. An alternate resource to use is HEINOnline.

New Eresource: Early American Imprints, Series I and Series II: Supplements From the American Antiquarian Society 1652-1819.

The initial release of a major new enrichment to the Evans and Shaw-Shoemaker collections has just occurred. Rare items from the American Antiquarian Society, available for the first time in Readex digital editions of Early American Imprints, are highlighted below.

The Gosport Tragedy (1776)


From Early American Imprints, Supplements from the American Antiquarian Society.

The Gosport Tragedy, or The Perjured Ship Carpenter, is a murder ballad set to the tune of Peggy’s Gone Over Sea. The folk song tells of a young woman lured by her lover into the forest where she is killed and buried in a shallow grave. In this version of the story the woman, Molly, is murdered by a ship’s carpenter, William, who had promised to marry her after she became pregnant. When William returns to sea, he is haunted by Molly’s ghost and confesses to the murder before going mad.

The life of a virgin, sweet William, I prize,
For marriage brings sorrow and troubles likewise;
I am loath to venture, and therefore forbear,
For I will not wed with a ship-carpenter,
For in the time of war to the sea you must go,
And leave wife and children in sorrow and woe.
The seas they are perilous, therefore forbear,
For I will not wed with a ship-carpenter.
But yet all in vain she his suit did deny,
Though he still did press her maker her comply,
At length with his cunning he did her betray,
And to lewd desire he led her away.

In other versions the woman is named Polly and the song is titled Pretty Polly. Some have suggested the ballad is the musical basis for Ballad of Hollis Brown by Bob Dylan who, in his early career, played the song under the title Pretty Polly. Woody Guthrie also used the tune for Pastures of Plenty.



The Solar System Displayed (1789)
By Bartholomew Burges
From Early American Imprints, Supplements from the American Antiquarian Society

Bartholomew Burges dedicated this intricate and surprisingly accurate map of the known solar system to the Academy of Arts and Sciences in the State of Massachusetts and to the Philosophical Society of Pennsylvania. Although this map was created 48 years prior to the discovery of Neptune and only eight years after the official discovery of Uranus, labeled here after its discoverer William Herschel, it includes Saturn’s rings and five of its moons as well as four of Jupiter’s moons. Even more amazing is the accuracy of the table showing the various planets’ distances from the sun.

Announcing a Semester of Carberry Celebrations!

Josiah S. Carberry at the foot of the John Hay Library staircase.

Josiah S. Carberry at the foot of the John Hay Library staircase.

”Never before has anyone so well captured who Josiah S. Carberry is and who he is not” – Truman Grayson on Made Not Born: The Wife and Dimes of Professor Josiah S. Carberry

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] Brown University Library is excited to announce that this semester the University’s best known, least seen Professor, Josiah S. Carberry, will be researching in New England and that he might or might not visit campus every Carberry Day!

Professor Josiah S. Carberry, called by the New York Times “The World’s Greatest Traveler,” has been a member of the Brown Faculty since 1929, specializing in the field of psycho-ceramics (translated as “cracked pots”).  Since 1955, at the request of an anonymous donor, the University Library has collected gifts toward the Josiah S. Carberry Fund in memory of Josiah’s future late wife, to purchase “such books as Professor Carberry might or might not approve of.” Every Friday the 13th (Carberry Day) friends of the University deposit their loose change in cracked pots to augment the fund

We hope that you can attend the below Carberry events, and that Carberry can too:

Josiah Carberry Society Luncheon
On Friday the Thirteenth of September, the Josiah Carberry Society will host a luncheon in the Professor’s honor at the Brown University Faculty Club. The buffet will include foods from the Carberry Cookbook: From Nuts to Soup and a short program about the making of Made Not Born: The Wife and Dimes of Professor Josiah S. Carberry. The cost will be $26.62; checks made out to Brown University, and sent to Box A, Providence, RI  02912, will reserve your place. 

Screening of Made Not Born & Reception
And later that evening (Friday the Thirteenth of September) at 5:30pm, find out who Professor Josiah S. Carberry is and who he is not, when Friends of the Library Board member Don Wilmeth presents the biographical documentary “Made Not Born: The Wife and Dimes of Professor Josiah S. Carberry,” in the Rock’s new Digital Scholarship Lab. Snacks from The Carberry Cookbook: From Nuts to Soup and discussion will follow.  This event is free and open to the public.

Carberry Cookbook Sale, Signing, and Demonstration
On Friday the Thirteenth of December, at 3pm, Connie Worthington, Carberry Cookbook editor and member of the Carberry Fund Half-Cohort will host a Carberry Cookbook sale, signing, and cooking demonstration (with free food!) in the Laura and David Finn Reading Room at the Rock. Perhaps there will be chocolate chicken! Perhaps fried dandelions or Oysters Rockefeller Library! Perhaps there will not! Come see staff from Brown Faculty Club to find out!

Carberry Society Dinner
And later that evening (Friday the Thirteenth of December), a dinner in the professor’s honor, hosted by the Carberry Society and the Friends of the Library, will be held at the Brown University Faculty Club (cost $40).  To reserve a seat or a table, contact JosiahCarberry13@gmail.com.  Cash bar at 6; dinner at 7; a talk “The philately of Ionian Revetments” may or may not follow.

#JosiahCarberry
As part of this momentous semester of events, every Friday this fall the Library will share materials from the Carberry Archive and Carberry Cookbook recipes. Check the Library’s Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for Carberry treasures. And, if you spot the Professor in his travels, or find traces of what might or might not show he’s been somewhere, please share on Instagram using #JosiahCarberry with an explanation! A repository will be viewable at Library.brown.edu/josiahcarberry.

The Turkey Carberry!
In anticipation of the Carberry Celebrations – Josiah’s Dining Hall has also crafted a new menu item.  The Turkey Carberry is two 5.5 oz grilled turkey burgers on a bulkie roll.  Enjoy this with all the fixings including the new complimentary sauce, cranberry, honey, and sage. This yearlong celebration is only $6.70 and includes fries and a fountain drink.

Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

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Brown University, National Archives and Records Administration, and National Archive of Brazil Forge Partnership

The group meets with Professor James N. Green in Washington, D.C. at the National Archives to speak with Janaina Telles, whose parents were political activists and were tortured during the military dictatorship, and Peter Kornbluh, Director of the National Security Archive's Chile documentation project and Cuba documentation project.

The group meets with Professor James N. Green in Washington, D.C. at the National Archives to speak with Janaina Telles, whose parents were political activists and were tortured during the military dictatorship, and Peter Kornbluh, Director of the National Security Archive’s Chile documentation project and Cuba documentation project.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — A unique, student-led project is the foundation for a partnership between Brown University, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the National Archive of Brazil, and the State University of Maringá (UEM). “Opening the Archives” is designed to provide online public access to the NARA-held State Department of Political Affairs and Relations declassified documents pertaining to U.S.-Brazilian relations from the turbulent 1960s, 70s and 80s.

To prepare to participate in “Opening the Archives,” Brown students studied Brazil’s history with renowned scholar, Professor James N. Green, and were trained by Brown University Library staff in the standardized modes of organization, indexing/description, and digitization.  Directly engaged with rarely seen historical documents at the NARA in DC, Brown students are now working alongside students from Brazil’s State University of Maringá to organize and provide indexing terms to these distinctive documents as they are digitized and made accessible through the Brown Digital Repository (BDR). Created by Brown University Library, the BDR is an online service for collecting, preserving, and disseminating intellectual output. Once in the repository, the NARA documents will be accessible via the internet to scholars around the world.

The “Opening the Archives” project reinforces President Rousseff’s promotion of public access to government information, her establishment of the National Truth Commission, and examination of the abuses of the former military dictatorship. And, the project has the potential to become a model for future collaborations between NARA and other universities, enabling NARA to make its historic records more widely available while also providing invaluable learning and research opportunities for students and faculty.

The mission of Brown University is to serve the community, the nation, and the world by discovering, communicating, and preserving knowledge and understanding in a spirit of free inquiry, and by educating and preparing students to discharge the offices of life with usefulness and reputation.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

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