Library Houses Indian Census Data

12/31/1872: The University’s library offers extensive Indian census data. Its collection goes back to 1872, with the latest 2001 census uploaded in an easy to use database in the Data Center at the Rockefeller Library. Variables such as caste can be researched down to the district level.
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Project Digitizes Sanskrit Language

1/06: In 2006, the US National Science Foundation began its support for the development of an International Digital Sanskrit Library Integration project, with Brown University’s Peter Scharf as a project leader.
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2002 Senior Oration: ‘A Confluence of Differences’

5/27/02: “The confluence of three holy rivers – the Ganges, the Yamuna and the Saraswati – is a sacred place of worship for Hindus. It represents the intersection of faith, tradition and holiness in India. Half way across the world, at Brown, I have found another sacred place where intellectual pursuit, freedom of thought, and infinite imagination, all converge here on a 238-year-old campus.” So began Maithili Parekh ’02′s senior oration during Brown’s undergraduate commencement ceremony.
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Munshi’s Research Shows Benefits of Community Involvement

9/08: Economics Professor Kaivan Munshi has posted a co-authored working paper suggesting that community involvement in politics can improve the provision of public goods. “The Efficacy of Parochial Politics: Caste, Commitment, and Competence in Indian Local Governments” is available here.
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Amitav Ghosh: On Burma, the British Empire, and Today’s Global Politics

4/24/09: Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh was one of the featured speakers in the 2009 International Writers Project “There Will Still Be Light: A Freedom-to-Write Literary Festival,” which focused on Burma.
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Zamindar Joins Brown History Department

10/11/05: While working in Pakistan in the early 1990s, Assistant History Professor Vazira Zamindar attended a lecture by Romila Thapar, considered by many to be India’s most distinguished historian. “I remember just being completely taken by her,” Zamindar said in a University profile published upon her appointment at Brown.
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Brown Acquires Indian Mathematics Collection

6/26/07: The Brown University Library has acquired the library of the late David E. Pingree, an internationally renowned scholar of the history of mathematics. The collection, consisting of more than 22,000 materials, is a remarkable resource for the study of mathematics in the ancient world, in particular India, and the relationship of Eastern mathematics to the development of mathematics and related disciplines in the West.
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Cable Television Linked to Gains for Women in India

8/2007: Watson Institute Visiting Professor Robert Jensen has published a paper linking the introduction of cable television to improvements in gender attitudes in rural India.
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World Bank Social Scientist Pinpoints Weaknesses in India’s Public Health System

10/2/06: World Bank Senior Social Scientist Monica Dasgupta shared her concerns about India’s current disease prevention in a talk last week at the Watson Institute. A demographer who has recently become interested in public health, Dasgupta explained that India’s preventive measures and sanitary system maintenance are in sore neglect, even though the country has strong response capabilities once a serious disease outbreak has taken place.
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Salman Rushdie: On God, Writing, Politicians…

11/16/06 – One day, when Salman Rushdie was thirteen and a half, he quit God. It was a day during the first year of many at the Rugby School in Warwickshire, England, and he remembers sitting in French class, or maybe it was Latin, looking out through the window towards the school’s famed Rugby Chapel. The young Rushdie thought the building, an oeuvre in the gothic revival style designed by noted architect William Butterfield, to be terribly ugly. “What kind of God would live in a house as ugly as that?” he remembers thinking.
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