All posts by jporter

Lusterware Bowl

Object: D46
JIAAW, Day Collection

This partial ceramic bowl and the six fragments associated with it are made of relatively thin clay with a green and brown design coated in an iridescent glaze. The center of the bowl features an abstract geometric design with large brown dots and swirls in negative space. The wall of the bowl and the accompanying fragments reveal that the sides are delineated by green and brown colored bands. An epigraphic band marks the upper portion of the bowl’s inside wall, with a swirl pattern that matches the central design in negative space. Here, the word Allah is visible in bubble writing. Though not clearly pictured here, the largest fragment suggests that the exterior of the bowl is glazed with an equally intricate design as the inside.

-Jinette Jimenez ’21, JIAAW Records and Collections Assistant

See other examples of Islamic epigraphic ceramics and learn more about ceramics in the Ancient Islamic World:

Bowl with Leopard | The Met

Bowl The profile of this fine bowl, with its straight, low, hollow foot; a transitional section between the foot and the body that splays outward; and straight, flaring sides, makes it typical of the ceramic objects decorated with luster paint by Kashan workshops in the early thirteenth century

Bowl with Arabic Inscription,

Bowl This bowl exemplifies the distinctive group of Samanid-era ceramics, known as epigraphic wares, which have calligraphy as their major form of decoration.

Ceramic Arts of the Islamic World

The evolution of techniques and design of early Islamic ceramics Islamic Art and Architectural Historian, SOAS Alumna Photo by Bilal Randeree. This article sheds light on the evolution of techniques and the design of these early Islamic ceramics and how during a series of migrations to new geographical locations, Islamic potters adapted the ceramic tradition to these new lands.

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Saucer-shaped Oil Lamp

Object: D67
JIAAW, Day Collection

This ceramic oil lamp has a bowl-like shape with a raised center and a rim that has been folded over and pinched to form a place for the wick to rest. Both the interior and exterior of this lamp were glazed with a blue-turquoise color. Today, the lamp’s pigment appears iridescent, evidence of oxidation over time. The chip in the rim and the excess clay on the edge of the central fill hole allude to a missing handle that has been broken off of the lamp. The wick hole appears to have been filled in with clay, raising questions of its functionality. Perhaps this particular lamp was converted into a candlestick at some point.

-Jinette Jimenez ’21, JIAAW Records and Collections Assistant

Learn more about ancient oil lamps and see other examples of saucer-shaped lamps:

Description and History of Oil Lamps

Roman Oil Lamps Defined A lamp is a device that holds and burns fuel, typically oil, as a means of producing light. Although oil lamps have taken on a variety of shapes and sizes throughout history, the basic required components are a wick, fuel, a reservoir for fuel, and an air supply to maintain a flame.

Collections Online | British Museum

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Lamp, saucer-shaped | Roman | Imperial | The Met

The Museum has temporarily closed its three locations.

Collections Online | British Museum

Description Glazed pottery oil lamp; wheel-made; light-brown clay fabric, covered inside with strips of yellow and light-brown glaze, including splashes of the same glaze on the exterior; open saucer form with a flate base, loop handle and pinched wick-hole. Curator’s comments Cf. W. S.

Pine Cone Capital Fragment

Object: Petra 9
JIAAW, Loan from the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

This carved pine cone is a fragment of a Nabataean Corinthian column found in the Great Temple at Petra. Carved out of white limestone, the pine cones on this column were likely intended to depict an Aleppo pine cone. Such natural imagery is believed to be related to Dionysus, the Greek god of vegetation and wine, whose influence in the ancient world spread throughout the Mediterranean. The link between Dionysus and the pine cones featured on this column lies in the resin that is naturally produced by pine cones, which was commonly used to seal amphorae containing wine.

This is one of the many artifacts from Brown’s excavations from 1993 to 2008, directed by Martha Sharp Joukowsky, of a series of structures known as the “Great Temple Complex” of Petra. The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology began its work at Petra with the excavation of the Great Temple, however its involvement has continued with further research on the hinterlands of Petra. The Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP) was an archaeological survey of the Petra hinterlands conducted from 2009 to 2013. The Brown University Petra Terraces Archaeological Project (BUPTAP) is currently underway, and is carrying out further research on the terraces examined in BUPAP’s initial research.

-Jinette Jimenez ’21, JIAAW Records and Collections Assistant

Learn more about pine cone capital fragments and Dionysus:

Pinecone Capital Fragments

One of the pinecone column capital fragmentsA second fragment Like many of the other objects on this tour, these carved pine cones are fragments of column capitals. These would have come from Nabataean Corinthian columns, and are made of white limestone. Pine cone resin also had many uses in the ancient world, particularly in wine…

Dionysus | Powers, Personality, Symbols, & Facts

Dionysus, also called Bacchus, in Greco-Roman religion, a nature god of fruitfulness and vegetation, especially known as a god of wine and ecstasy. In early Greek art he was represented as a bearded man, but later he was portrayed as youthful and effeminate. Learn more about Dionysus in this article.

Quadrigatus

Object: C028.08.02
JIAAW, Harkness Collection

RRC 28/3, Rome, 225-212 BCE, 6.54g 
This silver Roman Republican coin is called a quadrigatus after the four-horsed chariot (a quadriga) on the reverse (the back) of the coin. The quadriga is driven by the winged goddess Victory with Jupiter riding at her side holding a scepter in his left hand and preparing to hurl a thunderbolt with his right hand. The quadriga was a well known symbol and its presence on coins, especially in times of war, represented Roman military and political power and influence.

-Jess Porter, JIAAW Operations and Events Coordinator

Learn more about coin C028.08.02 and see other examples of this type of coin.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology

RRC 28/3, Rome, 225-212 BCE, JIAAW 028.08.02, 6.54g Can you describe this coin for us? This Roman Republican coin (RRC 28.3) is generally called a quadrigatus (silver didrachm), a name which is at least as old as Livy (22.52.2; 22.54.2; 22.58.4) and Pliny the Elder (33.46 “notae argenti fuere bigae atque quadrigae; inde bigati quadrigatique dicti; the marks of silver [given to soldiers during the Second Punic War] were two-horse chariots and four-horse chariots; for this reason they are called ‘bigati’ and ‘quadrigati'”).

RRC 28/3

Type: Jupiter in quadriga, right, driven by Victory. Jupiter holds sceptre in left hand and hurls thunderbolt with right hand; incuse on tablet, inscription.

Kubachi Dishes

Objects: M039 and M047
JIAAW, Minassian Collection

These exquisite blue and white dishes belong to a family of ceramics called Kubachi ware. Kubachi wares are believed to have been produced in northwestern Iran during the 15th and 16th centuries, but are named after the village in the Caucasus where this type of pottery was primarily discovered. The blue and white motif that is common in Kubachi wares is largely inspired by the pottery of the Chinese Ming Dynasty, whose influence in this period stretched beyond Central Asia. Kubachi wares are made of stonepaste (also called fritware), a type of pottery in which crushed pieces of glass, or frit, were added to the clay allowing for the pottery to be fired at a lower temperature. This produced a strong white body which, as in these examples, could be glazed over with an opaque white solution, mimicking Chinese porcelain. 

The Joukowsky Institute’s collection contains more than a dozen examples of Kubachi ware, including turquoise and black pieces, polychrome pieces, and more blue and white pieces like those highlighted here. 

-Jinette Jimenez ’21, JIAAW Records and Collections Assistant

Learn more about Kubachi wares and see some other examples below. 

Pottery – Later Persian

Pottery – Pottery – Later Persian: Since the whole of Central Asia now lay under the Mongol domination, overland trade with China greatly increased. By the 15th century Chinese influence, particularly that of Ming blue-and-white, was predominant, and the older styles were tending to die out (see below China: Ming dynasty).

Collections Online | British Museum

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Bowl | The Met

Kelekian, Dikran G. The Kelekian Collection of Persian and Analogous Potteries 1885-1910. Paris: Herbert Clarke, 1910. ill. pl. 81, Illustrates a similar piece [also Lane, pl. 20A] found at Koubatscha [sic], dated 873 A.H./1469 A.D. Dimand, Maurice S. A Handbook of Mohammedan Decorative Arts. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1930.

Dish with a Portrait of a Man | The Met

This dish belongs to a group of ceramics known as Kubachi ware. Named for a village in the Caucasus where this pottery was discovered in quantity, Kubachi wares are now thought to have actually been produced in Tabriz. One attribute of the Kubachi style is an uneven application of the glaze that has resulted in a surface-wide crackle.

The JIAAW Wreath

Object: Petra 37
JIAAW, Loan from the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

This wreath, which you may recognize as the logo for the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, was uncovered in 1998 during the Petra Great Temple Excavation in Petra, Jordan (1993-2008, directed by Martha Sharp Joukowsky). This limestone carving was found built upside down into a late Byzantine wall located between columns in the east side of the Great Temple’s Lower Temenos. There is evidence that this stonework was reused in the wall alongside a number of other reused and replastered architectural fragments from other sites. The wreath is a great example of a common phenomenon seen at archaeological sites: the reuse of materials and spaces over time. In fact, the Great Temple itself is a site that was reused and occupied by various groups, including but not limited to the Nabataeans and the Romans. 

-Jinette Jimenez ’21, JIAAW Records and Collections Assistant

Learn more about objects from Petra currently at the Joukowsky Institute and the Petra Great Temple Excavation below.

Petra at the Joukowsky

The elephant capital outside Rhode Island HallPhoto taken by Rainey Zimmermann Welcome to the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, housed in Rhode Island Hall at Brown University. This building contains a large number of materials from the site of Petra, located in the Southern half of Jordan.

The Petra Great Temple | The Lower Temenos

In the Lower Temenos, large, white, hexagonal pavers were positioned above an extensive canalization system which has been traced from the Temple Forecourt under the Lower Temenos to the Wadi Musa. At the Southern end of the Lower Temenos, at one time, a central stairway led up to the Upper Temenos.

The Petra Great Temple | History

By 313 CE (AD), Christianity had become a state-recognized religion. In 330 CE, the Emperor Constantine established the Eastern Roman Empire with its capital at Constantinople. Although the 363 earthquake destroyed half of the city, it appears that Petra retained its urban vitality into late antiquity, when it was the seat of a Byzantine bishopric.

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2020

Brown Bag

Talks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

January 30, 2020:
Ashish Avikunthak (University of Rhode Island)
Rummaging for Pasts: Excavating Sicily, Digging Bombay a film by Ashish (Chadha) Avikunthak

February 6, 2020:
Holly Shaffer (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
Goods Gained from Graft: An Archaeology of an 18th-Century Indian Art Market

February 13, 2020:
Dan Plekhov ( Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Terraced Landscapes: The Historical Ecology of Long-Term Agricultural Practice

February 20, 2020:
Débora Leonel Soares (University of São Paulo)
Working With Huacos: Archaeological Ceramics and Relationships Among Worlds in the Peruvian North Coast

March 5, 2020:
Alex Marko, Dan Plekhov, and Miriam Rothenberg (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Mapping God’s Little Acre: Documenting Newport’s Colonial African Cemetery

March 12, 2020:
Catherine Scott (Brandeis University)
Around the Hearth: Reconstructing and Recontextualizing Burning Features at the 2nd Millennium BCE Citadel of Kaymakçı, Western Turkey

March 19, 2020:
CANCELED: Kathleen Forste (Boston University)
Farming the Hills: An Archaeobotanical Analysis of an Early Islamic Town in Palestine

April 9, 2020:
CANCELED: Sanja Horvatinčić (Institute of Art History, Zagreb) and Rui Gomes Coelho (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Heritage from Below – Drežnica: Traces and Memories 1941-1945

April 16, 2020:
CANCELED: Amélie Allard (Rhode Island College)

April 23, 2020:
CANCELED: Julia Hurley (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2019

Brown Bag

Talks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

September 26, 2019:
Rui Gomes Coelho (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Sensorial Regime of ‘Second Slavery’: Landscape of Enslavement in the Paraíba Valley (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

October 3, 2019:
Tyler Franconi (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Looking in from the Edge: On the Marginality of Roman Frontier Economies

October 10, 2019:
Kathryn A. Catlin (Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Brown University)
Erosion, Infrastructure, and Sustainability in Medieval Iceland

October 17, 2019:
Raphael Greenberg (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Decolonizing the Levantine Bronze Age

October 24, 2019:
Zachary Dunseth (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Dung and Desert Copper: Bronze Age Subsistence Strategies in the Negev Highlands, Israel

October 31, 2019:
Laurel Bestock and Lutz Klein (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
iPads in the Sahara: Digital Field Recording at Uronarti and the Quest for a Universal System

November 7, 2019:
Kaijun Chen (East Asian Studies, Brown University)
Trading Zone: Imperial Porcelain Manufacture and Export in Early Modern China

December 5, 2019:
Aviva Cormier (Anthropology, Brown University)
Maternal/Fetal Health and Skeletal Dysplasia Inheritance in the Middle Woodland Period

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2019

Talks are heldBrown Bag
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

January 31, 2019:
Daniel Plekhov (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Scrollytelling and Archaeological Publication: Spring 2019 Project for Digital Archaeology Group (DAG)

February 7, 2019:
David Mixter (Binghamton University)
Palimpsest Urbanism: Urban Reworking as Political Action, a Mayanist’s Perspective

February 14, 2019:
Ilaria Patania (Harvard University)
Investigating Palaeolithic Space: Micromorphological Studies of Cave Sites from China and Tanzania

March 7, 2019:
Alex Marko (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Archaeology of Roman Hourly Timekeeping

March 14, 2019:
Lennart Kruijer (Leiden University)
Of Mind-Traps and Pornoboskoi: Objects in Motion in the Late-Hellenistic Palace of Samosata

March 21, 2019:
Gretel Rodríguez (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University) and Willis Monroe (University of British Columbia)
Thinking about Religion Digitally: Archaeology and the Database of Religious History

April 4, 2019:
Susan Pollock (Freie Universität Berlin)
Which Bones Matter? Investigations on the Former Property of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute of Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics in Berlin

April 11, 2019:
Karl Krusell (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Social Construction of Ships: Anthropological Perspectives on Mediterranean Nautical Technology and Maritime Practice

April 18, 2019:
Parker VanValkenburgh (Anthropology, Brown University)
Site Seeing: Towards an Ethics and Politics of Archaeological Vision

April 25, 2019:
Martin Uildriks (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Lost Cemetery of Mesa’eed: Legacy Data in the Study of Predynastic Egypt

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2018

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

 

February 1, 2018:
Marleen Termeer (Leiden University)
Coining Roman Rule? The Emergence of Coinage as Money in the Roman World

February 8, 2018:
Cristiano Nicosia (University of Padua)
Soil Micromorphology in Archaeology

February 15, 2018:
Emmanuel Botte (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Fish & Ships: The Salted-Fish Industry in the Mediterranean During Antiquity

February 22, 2018:
Lynnette Arnold (Anthropology, Brown University)
Imagining Family across Borders: Epistolary and Digital Communication in Migrant Families

March 1, 2018:
Jamie Forde (Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow, John Carter Brown Library)
Broken Flowers: Sacralizing Domestic Space in a Colonial Mixtec Household

March 8, 2018:
Anita Casarotto (Leiden University)
A GIS Procedure to Study Settlement Patterns in Early Roman Colonial Landscapes

March 15, 2018:
Miriam Rothenberg (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Montserrat’s Volcanic Landscapes: Rupture, Memory, and the Temporality of Disaster

March 22, 2018:
Linda Reynard (Harvard University)
Inferring Diet and Migration from Isotopes in Bones

April 12, 2018:
Darcy Hackley (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Social Landscapes in the Egyptian Deserts, 3000-1000BCE

April 19, 2018:
Kate Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Oracle Bone Divination and the Oracle Bone Database Project

April 26, 2018:
Stephen Houston (Anthropology, Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison University)
Arrival, Return: Movement and Founding Among the Maya