CFP: Archaeology of the Levant

Call for Projects

(Photographs, Films, Multi-Media Installations, Posters)

State of the Field 2020:
Archaeology of the Levant

Friday, March 13 to Saturday, March 14, 2020

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Abstract Deadline: December 15, 2019

The Levant, a loosely defined region encompassing the modern countries of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, and Cyprus, is rich in archaeology and history. The region has been central to the discipline of archaeology since the nineteenth century, and arguably even earlier. A long history of colonial rule, political and religious differences, academic specializations and passions, stark financial inequalities and war continue to inform and limit dialogue not only among local and foreign archaeologists working there, but also among scholars, local communities, government officials, and other stakeholders.

Aware of the ancient and modern importance of the region, the peculiar challenges it poses, the possibilities for collaboration, and the need for creative perspectives, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University will host State of the Field 2020: Archaeology of the Levant on March 13-14, 2020.  The event is part of the Joukowsky Institute’s “State of the Field” conference series, a yearly meeting which aims to highlight and reflect upon specific thematic or regional archaeological topics within a community of scholars whose research engages with those topics.

State of the Field 2020: Archaeology of the Levant will be dedicated to addressing the unique aspects of the Levant through a series of invited papers and presentations, aimed to foster constructive discussion of current and future directions for archaeology in the region. Topics of particular interest include:

  • Current directions, critical trends, and lacunae in archaeological research in any part of the Levant, or in the region as a whole
  • Museum, archival studies, and other investigations that rely primarily on archaeological legacy data
  • The effects of colonial rule, modern geopolitics, fluctuating national boundaries, war, and migration, among many other factors regarding the practice and interpretations of archaeological work in the region

To expand the conversation beyond conventional academic papers, the Joukowsky Institute now invites contributions – particularly from early-career scholars – that touch on the themes of the conference and highlight new and innovative approaches to the study of the Levant. We welcome proposals for traditional conference posters, as well as less traditional projects, such as short films, artwork, podcasts, multi-media installations, or other forms that engage with the themes of the conference in thoughtful and illuminating ways.

Accepted posters and projects will be exhibited throughout the duration of the meeting and will be presented during a dedicated time slot shortly before the Friday-night reception. Contributors are encouraged, though not required, to attend and participate actively in the full conference and will be provided with lunch on Saturday, but will be responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs.

To submit a proposal for a poster or project, please send an abstract of 250 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by December 15, 2019. For questions about this Call for Projects, or about the conference, please see our conference website, brown.edu/go/sotf2020, or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2019

Brown Bag

Talks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

September 26, 2019:
Rui Gomes Coelho (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Sensorial Regime of ‘Second Slavery’: Landscape of Enslavement in the Paraíba Valley (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

October 3, 2019:
Tyler Franconi (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Looking in from the Edge: On the Marginality of Roman Frontier Economies

October 10, 2019:
Kathryn A. Catlin (Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Brown University)
Erosion, Infrastructure, and Sustainability in Medieval Iceland

October 17, 2019:
Raphael Greenberg (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Decolonizing the Levantine Bronze Age

October 24, 2019:
Zachary Dunseth (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Dung and Desert Copper: Bronze Age Subsistence Strategies in the Negev Highlands, Israel

October 31, 2019:
Laurel Bestock and Lutz Klein (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
iPads in the Sahara: Digital Field Recording at Uronarti and the Quest for a Universal System

November 7, 2019:
Kaijun Chen (East Asian Studies, Brown University)

December 5, 2019:
Aviva Cormier (Anthropology, Brown University)

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2019

Talks are heldBrown Bag
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

January 31, 2019:
Daniel Plekhov (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Scrollytelling and Archaeological Publication: Spring 2019 Project for Digital Archaeology Group (DAG)

February 7, 2019:
David Mixter (Binghamton University)
Palimpsest Urbanism: Urban Reworking as Political Action, a Mayanist’s Perspective

February 14, 2019:
Ilaria Patania (Harvard University)
Investigating Palaeolithic Space: Micromorphological Studies of Cave Sites from China and Tanzania

March 7, 2019:
Alex Marko (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Archaeology of Roman Hourly Timekeeping

March 14, 2019:
Lennart Kruijer (Leiden University)
Of Mind-Traps and Pornoboskoi: Objects in Motion in the Late-Hellenistic Palace of Samosata

March 21, 2019:
Gretel Rodríguez (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University) and Willis Monroe (University of British Columbia)
Thinking about Religion Digitally: Archaeology and the Database of Religious History

April 4, 2019:
Susan Pollock (Freie Universität Berlin)
Which Bones Matter? Investigations on the Former Property of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute of Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics in Berlin

April 11, 2019:
Karl Krusell (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Social Construction of Ships: Anthropological Perspectives on Mediterranean Nautical Technology and Maritime Practice

April 18, 2019:
Parker VanValkenburgh (Anthropology, Brown University)
Site Seeing: Towards an Ethics and Politics of Archaeological Vision

April 25, 2019:
Martin Uildriks (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Lost Cemetery of Mesa’eed: Legacy Data in the Study of Predynastic Egypt

CFP: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2019:
The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Friday, February 22 – Sunday, February 24, 2019

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Keynote Panelists:
Logan Kistler, Smithsonian Institution
Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith, University of Otago
Christina Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma

Abstract Deadline: October 15, 2018

 

Ancient DNA has revolutionized archaeology and our understanding of human prehistory. Its insights have revealed hominins unknown from the fossil record, clarified global human migrations, and transformed how we understand plant and animal domestication processes. Despite these discoveries, many questions remain about how to interpret ancient DNA results and how to study the relationships between genes and culture:

  • How can we ensure that genetic results are interpreted within appropriate archaeological and anthropological frameworks?
  • How can we incorporate innovative paleogenetic methods into archaeological fieldwork and research design?
  • What are the ethical considerations of working with samples from archaeological contexts?

As laboratory and analytical methods continue to improve, the ancient DNA revolution is poised to expand even further within archaeology. At this time of innovation and possibility it is critical to assess the current trajectory and future of the discipline: the State of the Field.

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a conference titled State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology on February 22-24, 2019. Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological research. This year’s conference aims to address the many issues surrounding the development and uses of ancient DNA methods around the world and to promote discussion between archaeologists, anthropologists, and geneticists in order to examine new opportunities and challenges for ancient DNA research in archaeology.

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes or a poster, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 15, 2018. We will offer travel awards to multiple attendees, and encourage submissions from early-career scholars.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Genetic and archaeological perspectives on gene-culture co-evolution (e.g., lactase persistence and dairying in Neolithic Europe, high altitude adaptation and the peopling of the Tibetan Plateau, etc.)
  • Using ancient DNA to understand migration, exchange, and cross-cultural connections
  • Ancient DNA from plants and animals
  • Unconventional sources of ancient DNA data (e.g., environmental DNA in soils for identifying flora and fauna that do not preserve in the zooarchaeological or archaeobotanical record, dental calculus as a source of aDNA data on the oral microbiome, etc.)
  • Defining and naming ancient populations
  • Ethical considerations in aDNA research and involving descendant communities

For questions about this Call for Papers, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2019 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.


Download Call for Papers


Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2018

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

 

October 4, 2018:
Gretel Rodríguez (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
The Arch of Constantine and the Use of Colored Marbles in Late Antique Architecture

October 11, 2018:
Robert Preucel (Anthropology, Brown University)
The Predicament of Ontology

October 18, 2018:
Lauren Yapp (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Reclaimed or Reified? When Colonial Modernity becomes Cultural Heritage

October 25, 2018:
Georgia Andreou (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
The Cyprus Ancient Shoreline Project: How does coastal erosion fit the archaeological narrative?

November 1, 2018:
Jennifer Bates (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Life in Indus Households: an exploration of SPatial ACtivity Environments

November 8, 2018:
Nicholas Emlen (National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University)
Hearing the Voice of an Indigenous Translator in a 17th Century Aymara Text from Peru

November 15 , 2018:
Surekha Davies (InterAmericas Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University)
The Global, the Local, and the Ancient: Displaying Antiquities in Early Modern Europe

November 29, 2018:
Praveena Gullapalli (Rhode Island College)
Chronology, Craft, Conundrum: What to Make of the South Indian Iron Age?

December 6, 2018:
Karen Carr (Portland State University)
Swimming While White: When Did the Greeks Learn to Swim?

Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2018

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

 

February 1, 2018:
Marleen Termeer (Leiden University)
Coining Roman Rule? The Emergence of Coinage as Money in the Roman World

February 8, 2018:
Cristiano Nicosia (University of Padua)
Soil Micromorphology in Archaeology

February 15, 2018:
Emmanuel Botte (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Fish & Ships: The Salted-Fish Industry in the Mediterranean During Antiquity

February 22, 2018:
Lynnette Arnold (Anthropology, Brown University)
Imagining Family across Borders: Epistolary and Digital Communication in Migrant Families

March 1, 2018:
Jamie Forde (Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow, John Carter Brown Library)
Broken Flowers: Sacralizing Domestic Space in a Colonial Mixtec Household

March 8, 2018:
Anita Casarotto (Leiden University)
A GIS Procedure to Study Settlement Patterns in Early Roman Colonial Landscapes

March 15, 2018:
Miriam Rothenberg (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Montserrat’s Volcanic Landscapes: Rupture, Memory, and the Temporality of Disaster

March 22, 2018:
Linda Reynard (Harvard University)
Inferring Diet and Migration from Isotopes in Bones

April 12, 2018:
Darcy Hackley (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Social Landscapes in the Egyptian Deserts, 3000-1000BCE

April 19, 2018:
Kate Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Oracle Bone Divination and the Oracle Bone Database Project

April 26, 2018:
Stephen Houston (Anthropology, Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison University)
Arrival, Return: Movement and Founding Among the Maya

Illustration Club Gets Going!

We’re half way into the first term of the archaeological illustration club at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient world at Brown University, and we’re off to a flying start.  Club members began by illustrating objects they had on them the first week. People chose their keys, or rings, or cameras to spend time with and create accurate technical drawings of.

A ring showing progression from block shading to stipple.

So much of archaeology is the accurate recording of features of interest, at any scale. In the field this means surveying landscapes, drawing scale plans of excavations or otherwise recording the physical environment. Archaeological illustration is an extension of that practice, creating accurate scale images of objects. We’ve been learning the disciplinary conventions of how different materials are illustrated, largely relying on Griffiths, Jenner and Wilson 2002 Drawing Archaeological Finds: A Handbook. Leicester: Flexipress. 

Club members in the RI Hall Common Room

Our members range from keen freshmen to RISD students looking to expand their skill set, so come and join us if you’d like to have a go!

Brown Bag Talks for Fall 2017

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

 

September 21, 2017:
Carl Walsh (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
A Cup for Any Occasion? The Materiality of Elite Drinking Practices and Experiences in the Kerma State

September 28, 2017:
Itohan Osayimwese (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
Translating 19th-Century German Ethnoarchaeology: Hermann Frobenius’ African Building Types and Other Essays

October 5, 2017:
Shiyanthi Thavapalan (Egyptology and Assyriology, Brown University)
Counterfeiting Nature: Developments in Glass-Making and Glass-Working in the Late Bronze Age Near East

October 19, 2017:
Eva Mol (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Making Myth Real: Objects in Herodotus’ Histories and Material Epistemology

October 26, 2017:
Nicholas Laluk (Anthropology, Brown University)
Ndee (Apache) Archaeology: Cultural Tenets as Best Practice

November 2, 2017:
Katia Schörle (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
Economic Integration Principles and Competitive Markets in the Roman World: An Example from the Edge (Palmyra)

November 16, 2017:
Kaitlin McCormick (Anthropology, Brown University)
Contexts of Collection: Comparing Emma Shaw’s Northwest Coast and Subarctic Collections, 1884-1897

November 30, 2017:
Brian Lander (History, Brown University)
Living with Wetlands in the Yangzi Valley

December 7, 2017:
Graham Oliver (Classics, Brown University)
Re-Thinking Things: Archaeological Theory, Words on Objects, and Mediation. Reflections from the Greek Inscriptions in the RISD Museum

CFP: Archaeology and Social Justice

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2018:
Archaeology and Social Justice

Friday, March 2 – Saturday, March 3, 2018
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018.  The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, and is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.  Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students.  While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.

Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and, most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.

This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present. We welcome papers that explore the relationship between archaeology and the present political climate, with the intention of addressing the challenges currently facing the field of archaeology and the academy more broadly. We also seek to engage in conversations about the biases and structural problems that make archaeology more accessible to some than to others, in order to help the discipline reach a broader and more inclusive public.

The workshop will include four sessions, each addressing issues of the relationship of archaeology to ongoing struggles for social justice and/or the role of archaeology in those struggles. Rather than predefining the content of these sessions, we intend to shape them with contributions from this call for papers; we wish to offer an open space for discussion of the following, and other, relevant issues:

  • The materiality and temporality of current social issues
  • Disciplinary decolonization
  • Archaeology’s role in discussions of “diversity and inclusion”
  • Identity and inequality in the past and present
  • Structural and practical access to archaeology and the academy
  • Activism and engagement within archaeology
  • Archaeology in/of social justice movements
  • Archaeology’s relationship to white nationalism
  • Archaeology in moments of crisis

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 1, 2017.

For questions about this CFP, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.


Download Call for Papers
 


Brown Bag Talks for Spring 2017

Brown BagTalks are held
Thursdays from 12:00-1:00 PM
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
Brown University, 60 George Street, Providence, RI

Please note that we are still adding to our schedule, and these dates are not yet finalized.

February 2, 2017:
Brendan Weaver (Berea College)
The Archaeology of the Aesthetic: Slavery and the Jesuit Vineyards of Nasca, Peru

February 9, 2017:
Eduardo Neves (Harvard University)
Was There Ever a Neolithic in the Neotropics?

February 23, 2017:
Lia Dykstra (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)
An Authentic Fake:  Appropriating Romanesque Architecture for Barcelona’s 1929 International Exposition

March 2, 2017:
Axel Posluschny (Keltenwelt am Glauberg)
What Have the Romans Ever Done for Us?

March 9, 2017:
Nancy Jacobs (History, Brown University)
The African Grey Parrot: A Global History

March 16, 2017:
Catalina Mas Florit (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
From Roman to Byzantine: Shaping the Rural Landscape in Late Antique Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)

March 23, 2017:
Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol)
Manipulating Luxury? Understanding the Production and Distribution of Decorated Ancient Ostrich Eggs

April 13, 2017:
Samantha Lash (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)
From Soil to Society: Framing Land Use and Climate Change in the West Mediterranean during the 1st Millennium BCE

April 20, 2017:
Jana Anvari (Flinders University)
New Stories on Old Buildings: Recent Work on the Architecture of the Chalcolithic Çatalhöyük West Mound

April 27, 2017:
Sergio Escribano Ruiz (University of the Basque Country and JCB Research Fellow)
Basque Fishing along the North Atlantic: Capitalism, Mobility, Colonialism and Sensoriality