Celebrating the history and archaeology of Brown University and Providence, Rhode Island

Month: April 2014 (Page 2 of 2)

Stephanie Harris ’14: Residential Buildings

The house has to be considered as an individual, as a dynamic entity whose every month of life is significant for the men and women who act in and around it.” (Ruth Tringham).

Brown University’s Third World Center, or Partridge Hall was originally owned by Henry T. Beckwith, a descendent of the Brown family and the Dexter Family. Its architect was Alpheus C. Morse, the architect of Sayles Hall.

Blog posts by the students of Claudia Moser’s class ARCH 1764: 25 Things! 250 Years of Brown’s Material Past.

Keillor Irving ’15: Art, Design, and Display

Sayles Hall, built in 1881, is home to one of Brown’s most extensive and historic portrait collection. My final project will explore the history, significance and presentation of this portrait collection and aims to give students a new appreciation of a treasure trove of Brown University history they walk past every day.

Blog post by the students of Claudia Moser’s class ARCH 1764: 25 Things! 250 Years of Brown’s Material Past.

Connor Grealy ’14: Streets and Infrastructure

The Perry and Marty Granoff Center for Creative Arts is an example of Brown’s continuing push to integrate sustainable design into the campus’ overall push for recognizing, holistically, the need to consider our campus as part of the larger ecosystem. The building, which achieved a Gold Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) Certification, includes features that not only diminish energy use and utilizes green design but operates on the enhancement of the experiential use of building. The environment impact of buildings cannot be understated as they were recently measured to account for over 50% of energy consumption in the United States.

Blog posts by the students of Claudia Moser’s class ARCH 1764: 25 Things! 250 Years of Brown’s Material Past.

Nicholas Fair ’14: Streets and Infrastructure

During my time at Brown I have heard that the mysterious tunnels below our campus were used to smuggle slaves. I have been told rumors that they were also used to smuggle bootlegged booze during the prohibition period by members of organized crime operations. Furthermore, I have read that they were created in the event of a nuclear attack. Is any of this true? I plan to find out.

Blog post by the students of Claudia Moser’s class ARCH 1764: 25 Things! 250 Years of Brown’s Material Past.

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