The brain of Maleficent

For this assignment, I have chosen a Disney villain that demonstrates higher-level thinking abilities. Maleficent is the green, horned fairy seen in the popular children’s fairytale, Sleeping Beauty. She is poised and possesses unmeasurable amounts of anger.

Since she is an evil fairy, Maleficent would possess a cerebral cortex relatively larger and more highly developed than humans. She has the ability to utilize her magic to conjure spells and recreate herself, this leads one to believe that her need for a larger cerebral cortex increases. Maleficent can also fly, meaning she will need highly developed and accurate motor skills for navigation.

But when discussing the lobes of the brain, Maleficent’s lobes will be sized differently because her motives vary quite greatly from humans. Take for instance the frontal lobe, this will be relatively larger when compared to humans. Maleficent needs the ability to think more efficiently than her opponents. The temporal lobe found in the brain of Maleficent may be the same size of as the frontal lobe. As a villain, she will need an acute sense of hearing in order to be well prepared. The occipital lobe will also be larger than that of humans, Maleficent requires an accurate visual processing system. And, the parietal lobe may be the same size of that in humans. Maleficent relies heavily on her magic and creepy persona to intimidate others. Her emotional response is not expected to be highly developed.

s may be smaller than the one found in humans. As mentioned before, Maleficent is an evil fairy, with the ability to use magic. Even when she transforms into a dragon, she will not need highly developed sense of smell to defeat her enemies.

 

 

 

One response to “The brain of Maleficent”

  1. Whitney Grace Wilson says:

    Maleficent is my all time favorite Disney villain. I never would have been able to imagine the different structural differences of her brain as you have here. Why did you choose to enlarge the cerebral cortex to allow for magical use, and not create an entirely new segment of the brain just for that purpose?

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