Guantánamo, Going Forward: What’s Next for Current and Former Detainees?

september 15, 2017 in petterutti lounge (room 201), stephen robert ’62 campus center, brown university  //  9 to 11:30am  //  no advance registration required
ORGANIZED BY THE JOHN NICHOLAS BROWN CENTER FOR PUBLIC HUMANITIES AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

779 men have been detained at the Guantánamo Bay detention camp since January 2002; 41 remain today, their future uncertain.  Those released – to their home or a third country – are often challenged to rebuild their lives after Guantánamo, struggling with economic insecurity, social prejudice and precarious health.

Guantánamo, Going Forward: What’s Next for Current and Former Detainees?, a half-day symposium organized by the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, features presentations by the conceptual documentary artist Debi Cornwall; J. Wells Dixon, a constitutional rights attorney who will address the future of Guantánamo under the Trump Administration;  and Mohamedou Ould Slahi, former detainee at Guantánamo and author of Guantánamo Diary. They will address the current situation at Guantánamo and the prospects for those still detained there; the experience and possibilities for former detainees, including apology and reparation by national governments; and how individuals and institutions, in the humanities and across disciplines, can advocate and act for change.

The symposium will follow the week-long residency at Brown of Debi Cornwall, Fitt Artist-in-Residence, whose exhibit, Welcome to Camp America: Beyond Gitmo, opens on Thursday, September 14 in the Carriage House Gallery of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, 357 Benefit Street.  For more information about this exhibition, please check the Exhibition page of this website.

This conference was made possible through the sponsorship of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, with support from the Brown Arts Initiative, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, the Comparative Literature Department and the Department of Hispanic Studies.