Position Announcement: Postdoctoral Fellowship in Archaeology and the Ancient World

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University invites applications for a post-doctoral fellow.  

While appropriate training in archaeology, anthropology, and/or art history is required, the nature of an applicant’s specific research interests, geographical and temporal specializations and areas of expertise is left open, though these should be complementary to the present makeup of the Joukowsky Institute.  Special areas of interest could include archaeological science, cultural heritage, or maritime archaeology.  

In addition to pursuing their research, the successful candidate will be expected to teach half time — i.e., one course per semester.  Teaching will be at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; interdisciplinary offerings are desirable.  Applicants must normally have received their Ph.D. from an institution other than Brown within the last five years.  The successful candidate will be expected to make substantive contributions to the ongoing development of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, such as the organization of reading or working groups, a topical symposium, or another project intended to foster a stimulating intellectual environment in which to pursue research and to develop new interdisciplinary connections.  This will be a one-year position, beginning on July 1, 2011. 

All candidates should submit a letter of application, a list of proposed courses, and curriculum vitae by April 15, 2011.  Applicants should arrange for three letters of reference to be submitted by the application deadline. Applications received by April 15, 2011 will receive full consideration, but the search will remain open until the position is closed or filled.

For further information or to apply, write to:

Professor Susan E. Alcock
Chair, Search Committee
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University
Box 1837
Providence, RI  02912
E-mail:
Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu 

Brown is an EEO/AA employer.  Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

Position Announcement: Visiting Assistant Professor in Classical Archaeology and Art

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University invites applications for a visiting assistant professor position in the field of Classical archaeology and art, with a preference for candidates with research interests in Classical, Hellenistic or Roman art and architecture.  Scholars with museum experience and/or active fieldwork projects are of particular interest.  Teaching will be at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; interdisciplinary offerings are desirable. 

Candidates must be engaged with a promising and developing research program; the Ph.D. must be in hand by July 2011.  Excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching is essential.  The successful candidate will also be expected to take a full part in the academic life and to contribute to the ongoing development of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.    This will be a one-year position, beginning on July 1, 2011. 

All candidates should submit a letter of application and a curriculum vitae by April 15, 2011.  Applicants should arrange for three letters of reference to be submitted by the application deadline.  Applications received by April 15, 2011 will receive full consideration, but the search will remain open until the position is closed or filled. 

For further information or to apply, write to: 

Professor Susan E. Alcock
Chair, Search Committee
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University
Box 1837
Providence, RI  02912
E-mail: Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu 

Brown is an EEO/AA employer.  Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

CALL FOR PAPERS – BROADENING HORIZONS 4

CALL FOR PAPERS – BROADENING HORIZONS 4
4th Conference of Young Researchers Working in the Ancient Near East

We are pleased to announce that Broadening Horizons 4 – the 4th Conference of Young Researchers Working in the Ancient Near East – will be held in Turin from the 26th to the 28th of October 2011.

Registration and abstract submission are now open!

The deadline for submitting abstracts is 30th June 2011.

The themes of the conference are:

• Exploitation of the natural environment and sustenance strategies.
• Impact of human dynamics on landscape evolution.
• Socio-economic reconstruction of ancient societies based on
archaeological, historical or environmental records.
• Settlement patterns and exchange networks.
• Application of new technologies in archaeological research.

For registration and further details please visit the website:
www.broadeninghorizons4.unito.it/presentation.htm

Organising Committee:
broadeninghorizons4@unito.it

Visit us on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/broadeninghorizons4

Scholars at Risk Poster Contest

Why are scholars attacked? ~ Where? ~ In what disciplines? ~ What kinds of risks do they face? ~ Who’s doing it? ~ Why? ~ Why should we care? ~ How can we protect them? ~ What is academic freedom? ~ Why is it important? ~ How do we protect academic freedom? ~ What’s the difference between academic freedom and free speech? ~ Does it matter? ~ Why? ~ How does Scholars at Risk make a difference? ~ How can we help?

In the ten years that Scholars at Risk members have been protecting scholars, the questions above and many more like them have been asked, over and over.  While our experience provides answers, often our words are not enough.  Not enough to capture the courage, talent and creativity of at-risk scholars.  Not enough to convey the beauty, power and subtlety of concepts like ‘inquiry’, ‘freedom’ and ‘discovery.’  We need your help!

A picture is worth a thousand words.  So as part of our year long celebration of academic freedom and rededication to our work protecting gravely threatened scholars worldwide, Scholars at Risk invites poster submissions that answer some or all of the questions above, or that otherwise highlights university values and Scholars at Risk’s work.  We invite you to share this information with faculty, students and friends at your institution and elsewhere, urging them to join us in getting creative about defending scholars and promoting academic freedom!

Eligibility:
University and college students, faculty, staff and administrators from SAR member and non-member institutions around the world may submit entries. There is no age requirement; however, entrants must be currently employed by/enrolled in a recognized institution of higher learning. Individual and group entries are permitted, although maximum of three (3) entries per person.

Award(s):
The winning poster will be awarded $1,000 and will be featured on the SAR website and at the 10th Anniversary celebration of Scholars at Risk in New York City in October 2011. The winning poster at SAR’s discretion may be used online and in SAR materials, distributed internationally to SAR member universities and friends, and displayed at SAR events around the world. 

For more information:

For more information, including submission rules and guidelines, please visit: http://scholarsatrisk.nyu.edu/poster.php

Altar of the Twelve Gods Discovery in Athens – call for help

Just about two weeks ago, renovation works happening on the overground electric railway (ISAP) at the centre of Athens (around and along the area of Thiseio and Monastiraki) brought to light a very important archaeological monument that had for a long time laid buried and unidentified under the train lines: namely, the Altar of the Twelve Gods, one of the most famous and important monuments of Antiquity, reported from Thucydides as marking the very centre of Ancient Athens, and praised by Pindar as the brilliant navel of the Athenian Agora. As expected, archaeologists in Greece were absolutely excited with this new discovery, thus proceeding immediately to preliminary research and investigation of the site, whose authenticity was unanimously confirmed. Furthermore, a good and well-supported case for the possibility of further discoveries of great archaeological importance around the same site has been put forward, given the topography and historical information regarding this site of Ancient Athens.

 However, what to many of us would appear as a patently obvious case for the primacy of historical discovery and cultural heritage as well as a clear priority of archaeological excavation over whatever tangential functional considerations should be involved in the partial re-adjustment of the rail-lines along this site, given of course the historical centrality and weight of the discovered monument, this has not been thus shared by the corporate agents involved in the reconstruction of the overground. The relevant ISAP agents have not only rejected to consider the possibility of restructuring the design of the rail-lines around this important archaeological site or even re-adjusting the proposed time schedule for the completion of works so as to permit for the appropriate time for certain excavations to take place and possible solutions to be submitted by the relevant archaeological authorities, but have on the contrary been actively sabotaging the very possibility of excavations through pressing forward with the unwarranted re-burial of the site, in negligence of the jurisdiction of the archaeological authorities. Should the ISAP proceed with the reburial of the site in the name of an explicitly irresponsible short-sighted, profit-centred policy which blatantly disregards cultural, historical and archaeological concerns, little chance, if any, will there be for the re-disruption of the trainline, and thus for bringing the monument again to light at a later stage. (For a more concrete and detailed exposition of the discovery of the monument and the issue at hand, please visit http://www.ekathimerini.com/4Dcgi/4dcgi/_w_articles_wsite4_1_17/02/2011_379147).

Luckily, a number of archaeological organisations, groups of intellectuals, cultural and artistic non-governmental organisations, as well as a great deal of popular support has been mobilised for putting pressure on ISAP and the relevant authorities in order to preclude the hasty re-burial of the Altar. As part of this effort to hold up the case for the archaeological excavation of the monument, the support of classicists, archaeologists and generally intellectuals from all over the world has been considered as a crucial factor in helping shape public opinion as well as making clearly known to both the public and relevant public authorities the critical historical and archaeological reasons which mandate the protection of this monument and which are necessary to be taken in full consideration before any decisions regarding the treatment of the altar can be made.

Please help save the Altar by signing the petition found at : http://www.thepetitionsite.com/201/help-save-the-sacred-altar-of-the-12-gods/.  You can perhaps also leave your comments in order to support the cause and help raise awareness. Your support is crucial for helping protect this monument and for making sure this important event receives the appropriate attention. Please feel free to circulate this message around anyone who might be interested in this case and supportive of protecting cultural monuments of such important historical and archeological significance as this Altar.

Despoina Potari
DPhil Candidate in Political Theory
Department of Politics and International Relations
Oxford University