CFP for World Archaeology issue on Mobility and Migration

Call for papers for the World Archaeology issue (46.4) on Mobility and Migration

The aim of this issue is to look beyond the mere observation of large-scale movements or migrant networks and to examine not only the reasons that motivated people to migrate but also the consequences for both migrants and their host societies. This issue is therefore not so much about finding ‘hard evidence’ of actual migrants and migrations, although that is certainly part of the equation, but it rather represents an endeavour to explore the diversity and complexity of mobility and migration in the past, both recent and distant, and to investigate the many dimensions of these broad processes. The emphasis of the issue thus falls on local actors, practices, contexts and networks that sustained migrations and enabled mobility of, within and between communities in order to highlight the social and economic dimensions of migration and mobility.

The issue is due for publication in October 2014 and the deadline for submission is 1 February 2014

Please contact the issue editor Peter van Dommelen with proposals and abstracts at peter_van_dommelen@brown.edu
For more details see below and at http://explore.tandfonline.com/mobility-and-migration

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Mobility & Migration  – World Archaeology 46.4 (2014)

Migration has long been a major topic in archaeology and as long as culture history framed archaeological understanding of material culture, migrations have been seen as the stuff that (pre)history was made of. As New, processual and post-processual perspectives have steered attention elsewhere in more recent decades, migration has rapidly dropped off the archaeological agendas.

A lack of interest does not mean, however, that people in the past did not migrate and scientific advances in physical anthropology have forced the issue back on the agenda. The case of the so-called ‘Lady of York’ who probably hailed from North Africa, is an evident case in point. In other fields, like the ancient Mediterranean or the post-medieval northern and central Atlantic, the combined archaeological and literary evidence leaves little doubt about large-scale and sustained migrations, voluntary and forcibly alike.

The question is therefore not so much whether people migrated – they clearly did.

The aim of this issue is accordingly to look beyond the mere observation of large-scale movements or migrant networks and to examine not only the reasons that motivated people to migrate but also the consequences for both migrants and their host societies. This issue is therefore not so much about finding ‘hard evidence’ of actual migrants and migrations, although that is certainly part of the equation, but it rather represents an endeavour to explore the diversity and complexity of mobility and migration in the past, both recent and distant, and to investigate the many dimensions of these broad processes. The emphasis of the issue thus falls on local actors, practices, contexts and networks that sustained migrations and enabled mobility of, within and between communities in order to highlight the social and economic dimensions of migration and mobility.

 

  • Deadline for submission: 1 February 2014
  • Article length: 5,000 words
  • Instructions for Authors can be downloaded here