Fieldwork Opportunity: Transylvanian Limes – Identity, Liminality, Creolisation, Crisis

The mechanisms of Roman occupation of Dacia, the last Imperial expansion in Europe, are very complex and not well understood. First of all, the local population was still present, controlling if not the resources proper, the various technical aspects of harvesting them. Second, the new Roman population was a very diverse aggregate of ethnic groups from across the Empire, from the heavy Syrian presence in Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana to the many auxiliary garrisons along the various Transylvanian limes (such as our Castrum Cumidava). Third, the Dacian Provinces was de facto a frontier environment, constantly under pressure from foreign incursions from Germanic tribes from the north and west and the free Dacians and the Sarmatians/Scythian riders from the east. This liminal environment generated very dynamic vectors of creolisation and associated practices of identity construction. The Roman “civilizing” social constructs, based on an urbanized (and militarized) way of life, implementing processes of alienation through technical and technological dependencies, was constantly threatened by external and internal pressures. The very rapid process of urbanization of the Dacian Provinces forced a lot of dynamic negotiation and practical creolization in the definition, construction and display of social identity and status.

Our Roman frontier archaeology projects encompass the totality of “provincial life”, ranging from the evolution and integration of military life into the socio-economic and political fabric of frontier imperial society, the development of great urban centers such as Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana, the various aspects of rural provincial life and landscape strategies, and, finally, creation and expression of identity in transitory contexts.

ARCHAEOLOGY – EXCAVATION:

APPLIED FIELD METHODS:

For more information visit our website: www.archaeotek-archaeology.org , or contact us at archaeology@archaeotek.org . All our projects are designed as intensive hands-on field experience programs, complemented by evening lectures, and, as such, are open to both credit students and non-credit participants. For thousands of pictures and perspectives from our past participants, visit our Facebook ArchaeoTek Community page.

Our programs are intensive hands-on projects designed to immerse our participants in an active research environment and provide the opportunity for the acquisition of practical, technical and specialized field skills. Our projects are open to both credit students (both undergraduate and graduate) and non-credit participants (both student and non-student).