CFP: University of Lodz – Rome and Iberia

Rome and Iberia.
Diversity of Relations from Antiquity to Modernity.

April 25-26, 2019

The Department of Spanish Studies and the Department of Classical Philology of the University in Lodz would like to invite you to the second interdisciplinary academic conference.

While the Roman conquest was not the beginning of the Iberian Peninsula history, Roman presence in the region profoundly affected the lives of its inhabitants. Those relations left a permanent mark on the Peninsula and the vestiges of Ancient Roman culture still abound not only there, but also in other countries which came under Iberian influence. This issue is still avidly researched and debated by scholars of different fields.

The Second Interdisciplinary Conference is an opportunity for Polish and international speakers, considering and analyzing the issue from a variety of perspectives, to exchange research experience. We anticipate speeches on such interesting topics as the correlations between Latin and Romance languages, for instance Spanish and Portuguese. Also expected to attend are scholars who will address the issue of, for example, the image of the Peninsula in the Latin literature of the Roman and subsequent periods, as well as the depiction of Ancient Rome as a source of inspiration in Spanish and Portuguese writings. We also extend a warm welcome to historians, art scholars and archeologists, as the remnants of the joint heritage of Rome and Iberia are to be found both in literature and in material culture.

See the attached Call for Papers

Fieldwork: Roman fortress in the Danube Delta, Romania

A four week volunteer program on a Roman fort
in the Danube Delta Romania

Now recruiting volunteers for the 2019 season 8 July to 3 August
Cost: 1300 USD for full room/board and fees

Halmyris, occupied from the 1st to the 7th centuries CE, lies on the borders of the Roman Empire in a region which faced repeated attachs in Antiquity. The fort today reveals a wealth of material culture and a fascinating archaeological record with multiple phases of destruction and rebuilding.

Join us for 2019 and help excavate one of the best preserved forts on the Lower Danube frontier!

For more information on the site and how to apply, visit our website at www.halmyris.org or find us on Facebook at ‘Archaeology at Halmyris’

For all enquiries, please contact Volunteer Program Coordinator Emily Hanscam at email e.r.hanscam@durham.ac.uk

 

 

CFP: Social resilience to climate changes, at Kiel, Germany, Mar.11, 2019

International Open Workshop:
Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 15,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes VI
March 11-16, 2019 in Kiel, Germany

International Open Workshop: Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 15,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes VI

Call for papers

Session 11 :
Social resilience to climate changes with perspectives on the past 5000 years
Session conveners:
Liang Emlyn Yang, Mara Weinelt, Joana Seguin, Ingmar Unkel, Jutta Kneisel, Artur Ribeiro

During the past few decades, many studies have highlighted periods when significant climatic changes coincided with social upheavals. However, fewer studies have discussed periods of social stability or prosperity when faced with climate risks. The concept of social resilience has gradually become an important topic in scientific communities (e.g. Climatology, Geography, Socio-ecology, Geo-archaeology, Sustainability). It refers to the capability of a human social system to cope with stresses, maintain its function and evolve into a more sustainable society with respect to climate stresses. In fact, increasing studies are suggesting that societies continued to settle and develop in hazard-prone areas and periods.

The overall aim of this session is to understand different cases, manifestations, and changes of social resilience to climate impacts from pre-historic, historical and contemporary perspectives, from local to global perspectives, and from theoretical, empirical as well as quantitative modelling perspectives. Specifically, the session will discuss the following questions (but not limited to):

  • What are typical cases of social resilience to climate changes in past societies?
  • What are the key factors and features for a social system to be resilient in face of climate variation?
  • How was resilience performed in key societal sectors, e.g. agriculture, nomadism, livelihood, urbanization or population development?
  • How can social resilience to climate changes be quantified, evaluated, modeled or simulated?
  • What kind of changes and evolution of social resilience to climate changes could be observed?
  • What are the scope, thresholds, and tipping points of social resilience to climate changes?
  • What can we learn from the experience and lessons of the past resilient and/or “un-resilient” cases? Are these learnings up-scalable to explanatory theories?
  • What could be the pathways, measures, strategies and priorities for building social resilience in present societies?

We aim to reach a big session of around 20 presentations and propose to publish a Special Issue of 12-15 full papers in a scientific journal that captures the variety of subjects and approaches discussed in this session. Upon specific requests, we may consider partly covering the participating costs of those who submit qualified full papers.

The abstract submission deadline is November 30, 2018. Please go to the conference website http://www.workshop-gshdl.uni-kiel.de to register and submit, and also inform the conveners about your intention of full paper submission. First version of full papers is due a week before the conference, i.e. by March 04, 2019. A target journal and other issues are to be discussed with all participants during the workshop.

Fieldwork Opportunity: Archaeology and Anthropology Study Abroad in Ireland in 2019

The Irish Archaeology Field School provides expert led third level training in heritage based studies to both individual students as well as university partners (please see iafs.ie/) for more details). This year the IAFS are launching an exciting range of credited programs, focusing on excavation, anthropology, forensic anthropology and geoarchaeology. These courses take place in June/July/August, with shorter courses also available in March (during spring break), and vary in length from 1 to 4 weeks.

The majority of programs are taught from the site of Carrick Castle (and settlement), Ferrycarrig, County Wexford, the southeast of Ireland. This internationally important archaeological monument is the site of the first Norman Castle in Ireland, constructed in 1169. The site is located within the stunning confines of the Irish National Heritage Park, a 40 acre parkland featuring the largest open air museum in Ireland.

We also offer a geoarchaeology/environmental science studies program, administered by our parent company The Irish Heritage School, which uniquely combines field studies with laboratory work to piece together three different landscapes in three distinct locations: Birr, in the midlands; the Burren in County Clare on the West coast; and Clare Island in the Atlantic Ocean.

We are confident that our programs will appeal to students from a wide range of disciplines – including archaeology, history, anthropology, medieval studies, geology, environmental science, geography, Irish studies etc. – or indeed just students looking for a unique study abroad experience in general. Programs will include third level students of all ages and nationalities. Several cultural trips are provided as part of each program. Together with the option of staying with local families in homestay accommodation, these trips ensure a deeply enriching cultural immersion, guaranteeing students a truly memorable experience.

Visit https://iafs.ie/gallery for pictures/videos of 2018 programs.

Fellowship: ARCE Fellowship in Egypt

Advance Your Research with an ARCE Fellowship in Egypt

Scholars can apply now for the American Research Center in Egypt’s fellowship program! In ARCE’s 70-year history, our fellowship program has benefited over 700 scholars, who have produced an influential and substantial portion of all American scholarly output on Egypt since 1957.

Fellowships are open to fields of study including: anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art history, Coptic studies, economics, Egyptology, history, humanistic social sciences, Islamic studies, literature, political science and religious studies. The application deadline is January 15, 2019.

Fellowships provide funding for round-trip air transportation and living and research-related costs in Egypt. They are available to pre- and post-doctoral American scholars to conduct exploratory research in Egypt for up to one year. The bulk of ARCE fellowships are funded by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs through the Council of American Overseas Research Centers. Several additional fellowships are provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Review submission guidelines and apply now >>