Category Archives: CFP

CFP: Archaeological Chemistry: Art and Archaeology in the Ancient and Medieval World

Call for Papers
Archem2019
Spring 2019
March 31-April 4, 2019
Orlando, Florida

Call for Papers. The Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST) is planning a symposium on archaeological chemistry to be held at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Orlando, FL, March 31-April 4, 2019. The tentative title of the symposium is “Archaeological Chemistry: Art and Archaeology in the Ancient and Medieval World.” Papers on any subject that address this general topic, especially those that integrate chemistry with archaeology, those directed at answering social, political, and economic questions about ancient cultures, and those that incorporate the use of new technologies, are welcome. Please communicate your interest in participating in the symposium along with a tentative paper title and possible co-authors to either of the co-organizers: Seth Rasmussen (Seth.Rasmussen@ndsu.edu) or Mary Virginia Orna (maryvirginiaorna@gmail.com).

We anticipate that there will be a limited number of registration scholarships for non-chemical scientists to attend the meeting. More information will be forthcoming.

VERY IMPORTANT INFORMATION: The ACS abstract submission website, MAPS, (https://maps.acs.org/) will open on August 20, and the abstract deadline is November 5.

ACS has provided a HELP site at https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/meetings/how-to-submit-an-abstract/maps-abstract-submitter-user-guide.html ;

Also, those of you coming from abroad are urged to begin the visa application process immediately. To help the process along, personalized visa letters will be available for download once your abstract has been accepted by the symposium organizer or program chair. Letters will be generated for presenting authors and can be downloaded from the account of the person who submitted the abstract.

CFP: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology (Brown University) – Deadline Oct 15, 2018

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2019:
The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Friday, February 22 – Sunday, February 24, 2019

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Keynote Panelists:
Logan Kistler, Smithsonian Institution
Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith, University of Otago
Christina Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma

Abstract Deadline: October 15, 2018

 

Ancient DNA has revolutionized archaeology and our understanding of human prehistory. Its insights have revealed hominins unknown from the fossil record, clarified global human migrations, and transformed how we understand plant and animal domestication processes. Despite these discoveries, many questions remain about how to interpret ancient DNA results and how to study the relationships between genes and culture:

  • How can we ensure that genetic results are interpreted within appropriate archaeological and anthropological frameworks?
  • How can we incorporate innovative paleogenetic methods into archaeological fieldwork and research design?
  • What are the ethical considerations of working with samples from archaeological contexts?

As laboratory and analytical methods continue to improve, the ancient DNA revolution is poised to expand even further within archaeology. At this time of innovation and possibility it is critical to assess the current trajectory and future of the discipline: the State of the Field.

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a conference titled State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology on February 22-24, 2019. Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological research. This year’s conference aims to address the many issues surrounding the development and uses of ancient DNA methods around the world and to promote discussion between archaeologists, anthropologists, and geneticists in order to examine new opportunities and challenges for ancient DNA research in archaeology.

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes or a poster, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 15, 2018. We will offer travel awards to multiple attendees, and encourage submissions from early-career scholars.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Genetic and archaeological perspectives on gene-culture co-evolution (e.g., lactase persistence and dairying in Neolithic Europe, high altitude adaptation and the peopling of the Tibetan Plateau, etc.)
  • Using ancient DNA to understand migration, exchange, and cross-cultural connections
  • Ancient DNA from plants and animals
  • Unconventional sources of ancient DNA data (e.g., environmental DNA in soils for identifying flora and fauna that do not preserve in the zooarchaeological or archaeobotanical record, dental calculus as a source of aDNA data on the oral microbiome, etc.)
  • Defining and naming ancient populations
  • Ethical considerations in aDNA research and involving descendant communities

For questions about this Call for Papers, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2019 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.


Download Call for Papers


CFP: Archaeological Chemistry Symposium

The Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST) is planning a symposium on archaeological chemistry to be held at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society in Orlando, FL, March 31-April 4, 2019. The tentative title of the symposium is “Archaeological Chemistry: Art and Archaeology in the Ancient and Medieval World.” Papers on any subject that address this general topic, especially those that integrate chemistry with archaeology, those directed at answering social, political, and economic questions about ancient cultures, and those that incorporate the use of new technologies, are welcome. Please communicate your interest in participating in the symposium along with a tentative paper title and possible co-authors to either of the co-organizers: Seth Rasmussen (Seth.Rasmussen@ndsu.edu) or Mary Virginia Orna (maryvirginiaorna@gmail.com).

CFP: European Association of Archaeologists 24th Annual Meeting

Call for papers
European Association of Archaeologists 24th Annual Meeting,
Barcelona, 5th-8th September 2018
‘Reflecting Futures’

We invite abstracts for a panel on ‘Lived Ancient Religion in North Africa’. The title may have max. 20 words and abstract min. 200 words and max. 300 words. Five keywords are allowed. The deadline for submitting or modifying an abstract is 15 February 2018, 23h59 CET. Proposing a paper, poster or other contribution can only be done via online submission form (link: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2018). Current and past EAA members can log in using their EAA credentials (EAA ID, username, password). For assistance with retrieving credentials, please contact the EAA Secretariat at helpdesk@e-a-a.org. New members need to sign up for EAA account first at www.e-a-a.org. You can either pay your membership fees upon signing up or at any time before 31 March 2018 when registering for the Annual Meeting at www.e-a-a.org/eaa2018.

General queries can be directed at this email address: valentino.gasparini@gmail.com

Panel Proposal
Thematic field: The archaeology of material culture, bodies, and landscapes
Proposal number: # 634
Title: Lived Ancient Religion in North Africa
Abstract: The session claims to explore how, in the Roman provinces of North Africa, local religious preferences were strongly influenced by shifting social networks, changing over time according to specific historical contexts. The historical issue at the core of this panel is the process of integration of the pre-Roman gods within the Roman ‘pantheon’ and, at the same time, the permeability of the ‘traditional’ Roman deities in encounters with the cults problematically labelled ‘Oriental’. Speakers will be asked to approach the study of these ‘cults in motion’ not from the perspective of the civic religion as the dominant structure (based on the static and standardised performance of public, collective rites, and on elite-driven ideology), but of the individual as an active (often unpredictable) actor, capable of situational and creative innovation. This line of research is interested in the single cultic agents, not as ‘normalising’ actors (viz. representatives of institutional entities or local oligarchies), but as individuals who (independently of their social position) act as decision-makers and conscious modifiers of established religious patterns. Papers will deal with the archaeological evidence attesting the social dimension of this religious practice, including variety, creativity, religious multiplicity, fluidity and flexibility of identities, changes in forms of individuality, and spaces for individual distinction. The goal is to examine empirically religion as a practical resource available to emergent or self-styled religious providers, and explore how this resource was selected and instrumentalised by other agents, whether individuals, families, cities, or other social groupings.

Kind regards,
Jaime Alvar, Valentino Gasparini, Attilio Mastino

CFP: 5th Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium

CALL FOR PAPERS
We are currently accepting abstract submission for the 5th Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium, hosted by the  Department of Art and the Graduate Union of the Students of Art at the University of Toronto.

The Art of Passage: Transnational Encounters and the Convergence of Cultures: A Symposium exploring how cultural interactions and artistic migrations have shaped the growth of art and art history.

Friday March 9th, 2018
East Common Room Hart House
7 Hart House Circle
University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Keynote Address: Professor Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University

The transnational dimension of cultural transformation – migration, diaspora, displacement, relocation – makes the process of cultural translation a complex form of signification.
– Homi Bhabha, The Location of Culture

Concepts such as influence, originality, hybridity, and authenticity have long come to shape our perception and understanding of art history. While much of the discipline was shaped by the search for specific identities, typologies, or styles, artistic transformations brought about by intercultural exchanges and transnational interactions in diverse parts of the world throughout the history of art, have forced us to reassess seemingly fixed borders and to reconsider the mobility of art history.

Considering the expansive definition of “passage,” this symposium hopes to contribute to the increasingly robust scholarship that seeks to rehabilitate, reveal, and interrogate the formative role that intercultural encounters have had on the history of art. We encourage submissions from students and scholars employing interdisciplinary approaches in the context of visual culture from antiquity to the present.

Potential paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Colonialism and postcolonial perspectives
  • Cultural exchange through artistic movements, techniques, methods, etc.
  • Exiles, networking, and circulations of ideas
  • Transnationalism and its impact on local traditions
  • Nationalism, independence, and globalization
  • Cosmopolitanism vs tradition
  • Dislocation in the shaping of art in and beyond the “margins”
  • The effect of globalism on art and art history
  • Migrations and utopias
  • “Hybridity,” “mimicry,” and artistic practices
  • Art and ideologies
  • Art beyond the Western canon

Presentations should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a 10-minute question and answer session for each presentation. Selected presentations will be chosen for publication in the University of Toronto Art Journal, an online publication of the symposium proceedings. For more information, please visit: https://gustasymposium.wordpress.com/. Please submit an abstract (.doc/.docx/.pdf) of no more than 300 words to the Graduate Students of Art at gustasymposium@gmail.com by Friday, December 22, 2017 at 5:00 pm EST. Participants will be notified by email by the middle of January.

With appreciation,
Rachel Dewan and Marina Dumont-Gauthier
Co-Chairs of the 5th Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium