Category Archives: In the News

Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission (RIHPHC)-Public stakeholder meetings in September 2016

 riseal STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS
HISTORICAL PRESERVATION & HERITAGE COMMISSION
Old State House 150 Benefit Street Providence, RI 02903
Telephone 401-222-2678

TTY 401-222-3700

Fax 401-222-2968

www.preservation.ri.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / August 18, 2016
Contact: Timothy Ives, RIHPHC, 401-222-4139, timothy.ives@preservation.ri.gov

 

R.I. HISTORICAL PRESERVATION & HERITAGE COMMISSION TO HOLD PUBLIC STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS REGARDING COASTAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES DAMAGED BY HURRICANE SANDY

The Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission (RIHPHC) will convene two public stakeholder meetings to discuss the nature, significance, and management of coastal archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Native American settlement along Rhode Island’s coastlines over the past 5000 years has generated a rich and irreplaceable archaeological record. Unfortunately, much of this record may be destroyed in the coming decades by rising sea levels and coastal storms of increasing intensity and frequency. Following Hurricane Sandy, the RIHPHC noted extensive damage to archaeological sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NR) and many sites eligible for listing in the NR on Block Island and along the South Coast. Using Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Grant funds from the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, the RIHPHC designed and administered surveys to identify and evaluate these sites. The recently completed surveys identified and documented archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy, evaluated the significance of these sites, projected their susceptibility to future storm damage, and proposed management options.

The RIHPHC will hold two public meetings to present survey findings and solicit comments and suggestions regarding long-term site management. State Archaeologist Timothy Ives explained that “Local engagement is the foundation of both coastal resource management and historic preservation in Rhode Island.”

Information on the two meetings are as follows:

South Coast Archaeology Stakeholder Meeting
The Towers, 35 Ocean Road, Narragansett
Tuesday, September 13
7:00-9:00 PM

The Public Archaeology Laboratory Inc. will present the results of their survey of archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy on the South Coast of Rhode Island. Their study area consists of coastlines on the east side of Point Judith Neck (extending from Narragansett Pier southward to Point Judith) and along the southern shores of Narragansett, South Kingstown, Charlestown, and Westerly to Napatree Point. Archaeologists will discuss several Native American archaeological sites, in addition to Fort Mansfield, an Endicott Era coastal artillery installation. Public questions, comments, and discussion will follow.

Block Island Archaeology Stakeholder Meeting
Island Free Library, Dodge Street, Block Island (New Shoreham)
Tuesday, September 20
1:00-4:00 PM

This meeting will feature a presentation by the Public Archaeology Laboratory, Inc. on a seventeenth-century Native American site exposed by the washout of Corn Neck Road, the only land route between the northern and southern portions of Block Island. Next, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center will present an overview of archaeological sites along the island’s perimeter and low-lying salt ponds. Their findings show that Native American sites across the island are more diverse and widely distributed than previously thought, substantially recasting local research and preservation priorities. Public questions, comments, and discussion will follow.

 

Save

Archaeology for the People: The Joukowsky Institute Competition for Accessible Archaeological Writing — Deadline September 1, 2014

Archaeology for the People:

The Joukowsky Institute Competition for Accessible Archaeological Writing

As archaeologists, we write for each other in journal articles, book chapters, monographs, and other forums, using language that makes sense to fellow members of the profession. Yet the results of archaeological discovery and analysis are important and deserve the widest possible audience: archaeology has momentous findings to report, and for the periods before written history stands as the only source of evidence we have for the human condition.

We believe that archaeology is worthy of a better level of writing, one that is accessible and exciting to non-specialists, but at the same time avoids excessive simplification, speculation, mystification, or romanticization. Some of the most effective writing in this vein has appeared not in professional venues, but in publications with a far wider readership. As just one example, we would cite Elif Batuman’s article inThe New Yorker Magazine (December 19, 2011) on the Göbekli Tepe site in Turkey, and the many fundamental questions it raises about religion, technology, and human social evolution.

We therefore propose a competition for new archaeological writing, which anyone may enter. We invite the submission of accessible and engaging articles, accompanied by a single illustration and with no scholarly apparatus, that showcase any aspect of archaeology of potential interest to a wide readership. As an incentive, we offer a prize of $5,000 to the winner. The prize-winning article, together with those by eight to ten other meritorious entries, will be published in Spring 2015 in a volume of the Joukowsky Institute Publication series (published and distributed by Oxbow Books).

For more information about this competition, and to view the rules, please go to:
http://proteus.brown.edu/archforthepeoplecompetition/Home

Questions concerning the competition should be directed to Prof. John Cherry (john_cherry@brown.edu) and Prof. Felipe Rojas (felipe_rojas@brown.edu).

 Please help circulate this notice as widely as possible.

Bryn Mawr Classical Review Praises JIP I and JIAAW

Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2010.06.08:

Derek B. Counts, Anthony S. Tuck (ed.), Koine: Mediterranean Studies in Honor of R. Ross Holloway. Joukowsky Institute Publication 1.   Oxford/Oakville, CT:  Oxbow Books, 2009.  Pp. xxiv, 223.  ISBN 9781842173794.  $80.00.  

Reviewed by Catalin Pavel, University of Bucharest (catalin_pavel@hotmail.com)

Excerpt:

Apart from its quality, another reason this impressive publication is good news is because it is the first in a new series of monographs from Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute, one of the leading institutions in the world of archaeological research. In the preface, the editors thank John Cherry as general editor and Sue Alcock as the director of the Institute, and the whole team makes a second volume in the series worth looking forward to.

Full review at http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-06-08.html

KOINE: Mediterranean Studies in Honor of R. Ross Holloway is available from David Brown Book Company, at http://www.oxbowbooks.com/bookinfo.cfm/ID/86822 .

Underwater Archaeology Featured on This American Life

The January 22, 2010 episode of the public radio program “This American Life” is about “Stories of filling in the blank.”  The program’s second act is the story of two underwater archaeologsts:

Act Two. He Shapes Ship Shapes by the Sea Shore.

Fred van Doorninck and George Bass were unlikely candidates for pioneering underwater Byzantine archaeology—Fred hates water, and George found the Byzantine era boring. But that’s exactly what they did, when they devoted 50 years to uncovering the mysteries of a shipwreck. Along the way they changed how we think about a thousand years of history. Planet Money’s Adam Davidson tells the story. (12 minutes)

Listen to the whole program, at http://www.thisamericanlife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?sched=1336