Category Archives: News and Events

CFP: Archaeology and Social Justice, Brown University (March 2018)

Call for Papers:

State of the Field 2018:
Archaeology and Social Justice

Friday, March 2 – Saturday, March 3, 2018
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018.  The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, and is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.  Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students.  While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.

Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and, most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.

This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present. We welcome papers that explore the relationship between archaeology and the present political climate, with the intention of addressing the challenges currently facing the field of archaeology and the academy more broadly. We also seek to engage in conversations about the biases and structural problems that make archaeology more accessible to some than to others, in order to help the discipline reach a broader and more inclusive public.

The workshop will include four sessions, each addressing issues of the relationship of archaeology to ongoing struggles for social justice and/or the role of archaeology in those struggles. Rather than predefining the content of these sessions, we intend to shape them with contributions from this call for papers; we wish to offer an open space for discussion of the following, and other, relevant issues:

  • The materiality and temporality of current social issues
  • Disciplinary decolonization
  • Archaeology’s role in discussions of “diversity and inclusion”
  • Identity and inequality in the past and present
  • Structural and practical access to archaeology and the academy
  • Activism and engagement within archaeology
  • Archaeology in/of social justice movements
  • Archaeology’s relationship to white nationalism
  • Archaeology in moments of crisis

To submit a proposal for a paper of approximately 20 minutes, please send an abstract of 350 words or less to Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu by October 1, 2017.

For questions about this CFP, or about the conference, please see our conference website, www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018 or email Joukowsky_Institute@brown.edu.

Special Announcement: Two Leaders in Roman Archaeology Join Forces

Providence and Portsmouth, RI
March 2017

Two Leaders in Roman Archaeology Join Forces

The Journal of Roman Archaeology and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University are pleased to announce a new partnership, which will consolidate and build on our respective strengths: as a primary forum for research and debate in Roman Archaeology, and as a leading center for training and research in Mediterranean Archaeology.

The Joukowsky Institute will become the primary base of operations for the newly created position of Assistant Editor of the Journal of Roman Archaeology, beginning in July 2017. The Assistant Editor will also be appointed as a visiting faculty member of the Institute, teaching both graduate and undergraduate classes, and thereby further strengthening Brown’s expertise in the field of Roman Archaeology. (See the position announcement online at https://apply.interfolio.com/41106.) John Humphrey will continue as the journal’s Editor-in-Chief for the immediate future, which includes the publication of volume 31 (2018).

The goal of this collaboration is to ensure the journal’s longevity and success by providing a robust and supportive academic basis for the prominent role that JRA already plays in Roman Archaeology, which is an equally fundamental aspect of the Joukowsky Institute’s mission.

The Journal of Roman Archaeology is concerned with Italy and all parts of the Roman world from about 700 B.C. to about A.D. 700 This embraces Etruscan, Italic, Late Iron Age, Punic and Phoenician, Hellenistic, Roman, Late Antique, Early Byzantine, and Early Mediaeval, amongst others. It is Mediterranean-wide in its coverage and does not give priority to any particular geographical regions within the Roman world broadly defined. All aspects of archaeology, by the broadest interpretation of that word, will be relevant for inclusion, including historical material which has an archaeological component or which is likely to be relevant for archaeologists. Contributions are printed in any of the following languages: English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World is dedicated to the academic study and public promotion of the archaeology and art of the ancient Mediterranean, Egypt, and the Near East; our principal research interests lie in the complex societies of the pre-modern era. Joukowsky Institute faculty and students are from a wide range of countries and backgrounds — and Brown University’s fieldwork and research in archaeology and the ancient world reflects and builds on that multiplicity of perspectives. The goal of the Institute is to foster an interdisciplinary community of interest in the archaeology of the ancient world, and in the discipline of archaeology more generally. Its mandate is to promote research, fieldwork, teaching, and public outreach, with the Institute’s associated faculty, students, and facilities serving as a hub for this activity.

Professor Peter van Dommelen
Director
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Brown University, Box 1837, Providence, RI 02912
www.brown.edu/go/archaeology

John Humphrey
General Editor and Publisher
Journal of Roman Archaeology
95 Peleg Road, Portsmouth, RI 02871
www.journalofromanarch.com

Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission (RIHPHC)-Public stakeholder meetings in September 2016

 riseal STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS
HISTORICAL PRESERVATION & HERITAGE COMMISSION
Old State House 150 Benefit Street Providence, RI 02903
Telephone 401-222-2678

TTY 401-222-3700

Fax 401-222-2968

www.preservation.ri.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE / August 18, 2016
Contact: Timothy Ives, RIHPHC, 401-222-4139, timothy.ives@preservation.ri.gov

 

R.I. HISTORICAL PRESERVATION & HERITAGE COMMISSION TO HOLD PUBLIC STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS REGARDING COASTAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES DAMAGED BY HURRICANE SANDY

The Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission (RIHPHC) will convene two public stakeholder meetings to discuss the nature, significance, and management of coastal archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Native American settlement along Rhode Island’s coastlines over the past 5000 years has generated a rich and irreplaceable archaeological record. Unfortunately, much of this record may be destroyed in the coming decades by rising sea levels and coastal storms of increasing intensity and frequency. Following Hurricane Sandy, the RIHPHC noted extensive damage to archaeological sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NR) and many sites eligible for listing in the NR on Block Island and along the South Coast. Using Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Grant funds from the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, the RIHPHC designed and administered surveys to identify and evaluate these sites. The recently completed surveys identified and documented archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy, evaluated the significance of these sites, projected their susceptibility to future storm damage, and proposed management options.

The RIHPHC will hold two public meetings to present survey findings and solicit comments and suggestions regarding long-term site management. State Archaeologist Timothy Ives explained that “Local engagement is the foundation of both coastal resource management and historic preservation in Rhode Island.”

Information on the two meetings are as follows:

South Coast Archaeology Stakeholder Meeting
The Towers, 35 Ocean Road, Narragansett
Tuesday, September 13
7:00-9:00 PM

The Public Archaeology Laboratory Inc. will present the results of their survey of archaeological sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy on the South Coast of Rhode Island. Their study area consists of coastlines on the east side of Point Judith Neck (extending from Narragansett Pier southward to Point Judith) and along the southern shores of Narragansett, South Kingstown, Charlestown, and Westerly to Napatree Point. Archaeologists will discuss several Native American archaeological sites, in addition to Fort Mansfield, an Endicott Era coastal artillery installation. Public questions, comments, and discussion will follow.

Block Island Archaeology Stakeholder Meeting
Island Free Library, Dodge Street, Block Island (New Shoreham)
Tuesday, September 20
1:00-4:00 PM

This meeting will feature a presentation by the Public Archaeology Laboratory, Inc. on a seventeenth-century Native American site exposed by the washout of Corn Neck Road, the only land route between the northern and southern portions of Block Island. Next, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center will present an overview of archaeological sites along the island’s perimeter and low-lying salt ponds. Their findings show that Native American sites across the island are more diverse and widely distributed than previously thought, substantially recasting local research and preservation priorities. Public questions, comments, and discussion will follow.

 

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CFP: North American Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) 2016

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Call for Papers
North American Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) 2016
Theme: “Bolder Theory: time, matter, ontology and the archaeological difference”

We have all been inspired by theory. At one stage or another in our archaeological careers, we’ve encountered thinking that prompted us to ask new questions, work with new models and heuristics, pursue new lines of empirical enquiry, expose ourselves to inter-disciplinary thought, question our operating assumptions, or confirm our unspoken ideas and inclinations. Bold theory: theory that makes a difference – to us, to the discipline, to those we work with, and perhaps to other disciplines and our public partners.

This year the conference’s setting in Boulder, Colorado merges with our theme: what is bolder theory? Across the academy we sense an increased interest in things, in the matter of life. At the same time archaeologists are taking descendant and stakeholder communities seriously, including an increased commitment to consider alternate, non-Western philosophies and values. Collectively these ideas are provoking bold theorizing in archaeology. The plenary session will get us thinking about bold theory through considering the congruence of non-Western philosophies and theoretical approaches that take, to varying degree, a relational perspective on people and things. While issues of ontology, indigenous philosophy, animism and temporality will form the basis of the plenary session conversation, we encourage participants to consider bold theory in the broadest sense and sessions need not be limited to these topics.

Deadlines:
Session Proposals  | EXTENDED to February 7, 2016
Paper Proposals   | Opens February 7, 2016 | Deadline February 22, 2016
Session Rosters  | March 1, 2016
Early Registration | March 1, 2016Details: http://anthropology.colorado.edu/tag2016/