About Amy Atticks

Communications and Stewardship Specialist, Brown University Library

Renovating the John Hay Library: 2013-2014

John Hay Reading Room in its original grandeur.

A new exhibit will be on view for the month of June in the lobby cases of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, opposite circulation: “Renovating the John Hay Library: 2013-2014.” A more extensive version of the exhibit is also available online.

The John Hay Library, located at the crest of College Street opposite the Van Wickle gates, is one of Brown University’s historic landmarks. The Library was built in 1910 and served as Brown University’s main library from 1910 until 1964, when the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library opened. Today it houses the University’s Archives and Special Collections.

The current renovation of this historic landmark will include a refurbishment of the magnificent first floor reading room into an open, welcoming study space for students and restoring the size and grandeur of the original design. The area which formerly housed University Archives will be converted into a new state-of-the-art special collections reading room. In addition the first floor of the Hay will host a new exhibition gallery, student lounge, and consultation room. Plans include the development of handicapped access to the front of the building through the north side lawn.

This exhibit explores the evolution of the Library over the past one hundred years through a selection of materials ranging from archival photographs and drawings, to floor plans of the future Hay, scheduled for completion in Fall 2014.

For more information about the current renovation visit: Library.brown.edu/hayrenovation.

Models from “Introduction to Architectural Design” with Dietrich Neumann

Instagrammed model from "Introduction to Architecture" exhibit on view at the Rock. The Library is now on instagram. You can follow us @brownuniversitylibrary.

A new exhibit is on view for summer 2013 in the tall cases of the Laura and David Finn Reading Room featuring student projects from Dietrich Neumann’s Spring 2013 course “Introduction to Architectural Design.”

Over the semester, students learned basic concepts of space, materials, functions, structure, and light. After a number of initial exercises, each student designed a small house for an open space on East Street in Fox Point. Students responded to the plot’s geographic location and neighborhood.

Stop by if you’re on campus this summer to see more of these models.

Commencement Forum: James W. Head III, “Postcards from Other Planets”

Providence, RI [Brown University] – Brown University Library will host a Commencement Forum in the new Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, on Saturday, May 25 at 9am. Professor James W. Head III will present “Postcards from Other Planets.”  Utilizing the Lab’s 7X16 foot high definition video wall, Professor Head will lead guests to the mountains of the Moon with Apollo 15, allowing them to see the invisible lunar interior with GRAIL spacecraft gravity data, cross the floor of Gale Crater on Mars with the Curiosity rover, and join Brown planetary geoscientists as they explore the Mars-like Antarctic Dry Valleys for months at a time.

Professor Head is the Louis and Elizabeth Scherck Distinguished Professor of Geological Sciences. He came to Brown University in 1973, following his work with the NASA Apollo program. His current research centers on the processes that form and modify the surfaces, crusts and lithospheres of planets, how these processes vary with time, and how such processes interact to produce the historical record preserved on the planets. Since 1984, Dr. Head convenes the Vernadsky Institute/Brown University microsymposia, held twice yearly in Moscow and Houston. He is a co-investigator for the NASA MESSENGER mission to Mercury and Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), as well as the European Space Agency’s Mars Express Mission. He has previously served as an investigator with NASA and Russian Space Missions, such as the Soviet Venera 15/16 and Phobos missions, and the US Magellan (Venus), Galileo (Jupiter), Mars Surveyor, Russian Mars 1996, and Space Shuttle missions.

This talk is free, open to the public, and morning refreshments will be provided. Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. The Digital Scholarship Lab is located on the first floor of the Rock.  Enter through the circulation gates, take your first right, and pass through the two glass doors into the Periodicals Reading Room.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

 

“Digital Stories / Analog Brownies”: A Digital Storytelling Diversion

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] – On Monday, May 13, from 4-6pm, join students from Tyler Denmead’s Digital Storytelling course in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rock for “Digital Stories / Analog Brownies.” This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

What exactly is digital storytelling? Over the course of the Spring semester, students in Digital Storytelling have tried to answer this question while exploring the narrative possibilities of new media.  Because some things just can’t be digitized, this event will also feature brownies.

New digital tools have made it easy to create and share information with a wide audience. But these media – websites, digital shorts, even PowerPoint presentations – also have narrative potential that can reinforce or alter traditional storytelling formats. Students have explored these digital tools through a range of story structures, including place-based and non-linear stories. Works range from personal family history to an interpretive album of astronomical images.

To learn more, please check out the exhibit website http://digibrownies.weebly.com/ and look for #digistory on Twitter. And join us on May 13th! For a preview, check out this personal story from Public Humanities superstar Elon Cook: http://youtu.be/sknWXF-e4IE

Center for Public Humanities at Brown University fosters education, research, and public engagement initiatives to connect individuals and communities to art, history, and culture.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

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Hannah Gribetz ’15 Receives Undergraduate Award for Excellence in Library Research

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Brown University Library is pleased to announce that Hannah Gribetz ’15 is the recipient of the seventh annual Undergraduate Award for Excellence in Library Research, generously funded by Douglas W. Squires, ’73. This award, established in partnership with the Office of the Dean of the College, recognizes undergraduate projects that make extensive and creative use of the Brown University Library’s collections, including print and primary resources, databases, and special collections.

Hannah is a Classics concentrator from New York City and a sister of the Alpha Delta Phi Society. Her paper, “Clock-keeping Guide to the Maintenance of the Grandfather Clock of the Brunonian Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi: Including a History of the Clock, and of Eli Whitney Blake III, in Whose Memory it Was Given,” began with a simple inquiry into the dedication attached to a grandfather clock that sits on the stairwell landing in Goddard House. This led her to the University Archives where she began an in-depth study of Eli Whitney Blake III, Class of 1888, his family, and his connections to Brown.

As Hannah’s instructor, Joseph Pucci, explains, Hannah has “…an ability to read humanistic texts creatively, and an equal ability to speak and to write about them in cogent ways…The paper is beautifully written and takes full advantage of Hannah’s skills in hunting down sources, both archival and living, in order to articulate an innately interesting life betokened now by a beautiful clock.”

A PDF of Hannah’s paper is available for download and reading here. The Undergraduate Award for Excellence in Library Research is awarded every spring. Information about the 2014 award contest will be available in fall 2013.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

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Posted in Hay

World Wide Film Premiere: Two Who Dared

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — In commemoration of Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Brown University will host free public screenings of the documentary Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War, on April 9 and April 16 at 7pm in the Watson Institute for International Studies at 111 Thayer Street. These screenings are part of a world-wide premiere occurring simultaneously at community churches, synagogues, theaters and schools.Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War, tells the story of a Unitarian minister, Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha, Pembroke class of 1926, who, just days prior to the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia, left their young children in Wellesley, Massachusetts to help save Jewish children being persecuted in Eastern Europe.The film was directed by Artemis Joukowsky III (P’14, P’16), the Sharps’ grandson. Artemis explains, “As a 9th grader, I was given a homework assignment to interview someone of moral courage. When I asked my mother if she had any suggestions for a subject, to my shock she said, ‘Talk to your grandmother’! What I discovered in doing that assignment, and in many years to come, is that my grandmother and grandfather had a dramatic history that I had never heard before. This included underground espionage, working to rescue refugees and opposing the Nazi regime, in the service work that they had performed during World War II in Europe in 1939 and 1940.”The documentary is told from the point of view of Martha and Waitstill, drawing on their recorded interviews, letters, and unpublished memoirs. A gift of the Sharp Archive to the Brown University Library is planned by the family. The film also includes interviews with noted scholars and survivors who were rescued as children.

The film will open in New England with a screening hosted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at the Boston Public Library on March 13. Over 50 public screenings will follow April 7-18, 2013 at venues around the world, including Israel, France, London, Toronto, LA, and NYC. Brown University will stream a 30-minute educational version of the film online for 48 hours from April 19 at 5pm through April 22 at 8am at http://www.watsoninstitute.org/twowhodared.

For more information on screening times and locations or to host a screening, visit http://twowhodared.com/ or contact twowhodared@gmail.com.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

The Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University is a leading center for research and teaching on the most important problems of our time. The Watson Institute focuses on two areas: global security, and political economy and development. Its research aims to improve policies and its use of innovative media engages the broader public in global dialogue. http://watsoninstitute.org/

Press Contact: Andrea Pass | 201-498-1600 | apass@scompr.com

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Annual Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series Lecture to feature Lucette Lagnado!

Providence, RI [Brown University] – At 5:30pm on Monday, April 22, 2013, Lucette Lagnado will give a Friends of the Library sponsored talk, “IN SEARCH OF MY ARROGANT YEARS – Recalling my lost childhood from Cairo to Paris to New York”  as part of the Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series in the Lownes Room on the second floor of the John Hay Library.  This lecture is free and open to the public, a reception and book signing will follow.

Lucette Lagnado is a cultural and investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal, where she has received numerous prizes for her work. She and her family left Egypt as refugees when she was a small child, an experience that helped shape and inform her two recent memoirs, The Arrogant Years and The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit, published by Ecco/HarperCollins. “Sharkskin,” which received the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, has been translated in several languages including French and Arabic, and has been very popular in Egypt.  She is also the co-author of Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz, which has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Lagnado resides with her husband, journalist Douglas Feiden, in Manhattan and Sag Harbor, New York.

Friends of the Library is an association interested in fostering the growth and usefulness of the Brown University Library and in encouraging gifts of books, desirable collections, other scholarly materials and funds.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

 

ATTN: Faculty and Students, Special Collections Deadline Approaching!

Providence, RI [Brown University] – The Brown University Library is excited to announce the launching of the John Hay Library renovation project. Revitalization of this historic landmark will include a refurbishment of the magnificent first floor reading room into an open, welcoming study space for students; the creation of a new state-of-the-art special collections reading room in the area which formerly housed University Archives; improvements to the service and exhibit areas in the Central Hall of the first floor; addition of a student lounge and conference room; handicapped access to the front of the Library and code compliance and fire safety improvements throughout the building.

To accommodate the extensive work involved in the renovation, the John Hay Library will close beginning June 1, 2013, and will remain closed through the duration of the construction project until Fall 2014. During the construction project, there will be no access to the building, and access to Special Collections & Archives materials by faculty, students, and other researchers will be limited.

We will be able to pull a limited amount of Special Collections & Archives materials from the Hay Library stacks prior to the Library’s closing on June 1, 2013. These materials will be shelved elsewhere temporarily for access by classes and researchers during the renovation period. We are asking faculty and others to help us identify Special Collections & Archives materials that will be needed during the period that the Library will be closed. This input must be provided no later than April 5, 2013.

Specifically, faculty who will be teaching a course during Fall 2013 or Spring 2014 that will utilize Hay Library materials must contact the Library at HayRenovation@brown.edu by April 5, 2013.

Also, graduate students or undergraduate honors thesis students planning to do research using Special Collections & Archives materials during this period (June 2013 thru Fall 2014) must contact the Library at HayRenovation@brown.edu by April 5, 2013.

Please note that any Special Collections & Archives materials located at the Library Collections Annex (as denoted in the Josiah catalog record) will continue to be available throughout the renovation period. These materials may be used at the Annex (10 Park Lane, Providence) or requested for use on campus.

A temporary special collections reading area will be established in the Rockefeller Library to consult Special Collections & Archives materials retrieved from the Annex or that have been requested in advance of the Hay Library’s temporary closing. In addition, the Library encourages use of its digitized Signature Collections (selected Special Collections materials which have been digitized for public use) during the renovation period.

The John Hay Library renovation project is scheduled to be completed by the start of the Fall 2014 semester. With the capable guidance of Seldorf Architects, known for their elegant treatment in designing and renovating cultural institutions, the renewal of this space not only will fulfill important scholarly and programmatic needs of the Library and campus. The project’s completion also will serve to honor the John Hay Library’s founding donor, Andrew Carnegie, whose philanthropy was intended to do “real and permanent good,” benefitting Brown both today and tomorrow. We are most grateful to our generous donors for making this wonderful project possible. The results promise to be a space that will better protect and service the Library’s unique Special Collections, and open both the Library and its collections to inspire Brown students today and for generations to come.

We greatly appreciate the cooperation of all Brown faculty and students and other researchers and friends of the Hay during the period that the Library will be closed. We will provide regular updates on the progress of the John Hay Library renovation throughout the project. Additional information will be available at the project web site.

Contact: Daniel O’Mahony

 

Showcasing the Digital Scholarship Lab: Spring Series, 2013

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — This spring, Brown University Library is launching a series of talks by Brown faculty and visiting scholars across the disciplines to celebrate the opening of the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab at the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library.  All talks for Showcasing the Digital Scholarship Lab: Spring Series, 2013 are free, open to the public, and followed by catered receptions. Space is limited. Seating is first-come, first-serve.

Series speakers will discuss and demonstrate ways in which digital technologies, especially those enabling data visualization and analysis, have impact on their teaching and research and enable new forms of student learning and interaction. Talks are scheduled for Thursday evenings (and one Tuesday evening) starting at 5:30pm.

The series will kick off on March 14. Sheila Bonde, Professor of the History of Art and Architecture and Professor of Archaeology at Brown, will give a lecture titled “Re-presenting the Past,” examining the challenges of representing the past through the lens of archaeological work at the French medieval monasteries of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes in Soissons and Notre Dame d’Ourscamp. Bonde will look at the challenges of incomplete data, of representing time and movement, and of going beyond visual representation.

Massimo Riva, Professor of Italian studies at Brown, Director of the Brown Center in Bologna and Director of the Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown will give the second talk on Thursday, March 21. Riva’s talk, “The Virtual Life of Books and Other Curious Artifacts,” will examine how great books, such as Boccaccio’s Decameron, and curious historical artifacts, like the Garibaldi panorama, help us rethink research and teaching in the digital age. 

Speaker schedule:

Thursday, March 14 – Sheila Bonde, Professor of History of Art and Architecture and Professor of Archaeology at Brown University

Thursday, March 21 – Massimo Riva, Professor of Italian Studies, Director Brown Center in Bologna and Director, Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown University

Thursday, April 4 – Rachel Franklin, Assistant Professor of Population Studies at Brown University

Thursday, April 11 – John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University

Thursday, April 18 – Eben Gay, REVEAL architect.

Thursday, April 25 – Jill Pipher, Professor of Mathematics at Brown University and Director, of ICERM, The Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics

Tuesday, April 30 – Andries Van Dam, Thomas J. Watson, Jr. University Professor of Technology and Education and Professor of Computer Science at Brown University

Thursday, May 2 – Shawn Greenlee, Assistant Professor of Foundation Studies at the Rhode Island School of Design

The Lab, located on the first floor of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, features a 7’x16′ video wall composed of over 24 million pixels for data visualization and analysis. The wall can be configured to display up to twelve independent video sources simultaneously, making the Lab an effective collaboration space.  The Lab is also outfitted with a wide range of software for scholars across the disciplines, a state-of-the-art audio system, video conferencing capabilities, programmable lighting, and two 50″ touch-screen displays that can be used independently or linked to the video wall for collaborative display and interaction.

For updates on the series visit library.brown.edu/dsl.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

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POSTPONED: Massimo Riva, “The Virtual Life of Books and Other Curious Artifacts”

This evening’s lecture with Massimo Riva, “The Virtual Life of Books and Other Curious Artifacts” in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown has been postponed until Thursday, March 21 at 5:30pm due to inclement weather. 

Please join us next Thursday, March 14 when Sheila Bonde, professor of the history of art and architecture and professor of archaeology at Brown, will give a lecture titled “Re-presenting the Past,” which will examine the challenges of representing the past through the lens of archaeological work at the French medieval monasteries of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes in Soissons and Notre Dame d’Ourscamp. Bonde will look at the challenges of incomplete data, of representing time and movement, and of going beyond visual representation.