About Amy Atticks

Communications and Stewardship Specialist, Brown University Library

BUL Spring 2013 Events and Exhibits Calendar!

Providence, RI [Brown University] – The Brown University Library is excited to announce our line up of Spring 2013 Events and Exhibits. A downloadable PDF of the calendar is available here.

EVENTS:

Screening of Lincoln (2012) and Q&A with Michael Vorenberg
Friday, March 1, 2013 • 5:30pm
Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
In celebration of Lincoln’s birthday, and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Brown University Library, the Office of Public Affairs and University Relations, and the Center for the Study of Slavery & Justice will host a complimentary public screening of DreamWorks’ Lincoln followed by a Q&A with Michael Vorenberg, Associate Professor of History at Brown, and author of Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment. This event is open to the public. Seating is limited and tickets are required. Seats will be held for ticketed attendees until 5:20pm on March 1, at which point remaining seats will be released to patrons at the door on a first-come, first-serve basis. Reserve your tickets today.

Showcasing the Digital Scholarship Lab: Spring Series, 2013 • 5:30pm
March 14: Sheila Bonde | March 21: Massimo Riva | April 4: Rachel Franklin | April 11: John Cayley | April 18: Best of Hackfest 2013 | April 25: Jill Pipher | April 30Andries van Dam | May 2: Shawn Greenlee
Digital Scholarship Lab, First Floor John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library
Brown University Library is launching a series of talks by Brown faculty and visiting scholars across the disciplines to celebrate the opening of the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab at the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library. Speakers will discuss and demonstrate ways in which digital technologies, especially those enabling data visualization and analysis, have impact on their teaching and research and enable new forms of student learning and interaction. All talks are free, open to the public, and followed by catered receptions. Space is limited. Seating is first-come, first-serve. For more information on series speakers and talks visit the DSL homepage.

World Wide Film Premiere of Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War 
Tuesday, April 9 & April 16, 2013 • 7:00pm 
Watson Institute for International Studies 
In commemoration of Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, the Watson Institute for International Studies and Brown University Library are co-sponsoring free public screenings of the documentary Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War. These screenings are part of a world-wide premiere occurring simultaneously at community churches, synagogues, theaters and school. Two Who Dared: The Sharps’ War, tells the story of a Unitarian minister, Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha, Pembroke class of 1926, who, just days prior to the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia, left their young children in Wellesley, Massachusetts to help save Jewish children being persecuted in Eastern Europe. Brown University will stream a 30-minute educational version of the film online for 48 hours from April 19 at 5:00pm through April 22 at 8:00am on the Watson Institute website. For more information on screening times and locations, or to host a screening, visit the Two Who Dared website or contact twowhodared@gmail.com.

Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series: Lucette Lagnado 
Monday, April 22, 2013 • 5:30pm 
Lownes Room, John Hay Library 
For this year’s annual Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series talk, come hear Egyptian-born American journalist and memoirist, and reporter for the Wall Street Journal, Lucette Lagnado, speak at the John Hay Library. A reception will follow. This talk is free and open to the public. The Mel and Cindy Yoken Cultural Series is sponsored by Friends of the Library.

EXHIBITS:

The Festive City
Now through July 14, 2013
Buonanno Works on Paper & Tsiaris Photography Galleries, RISD Museum of Art

Come see The Festive City, on view at the RISD Museum of Art, featuring materials from the Brown University Library’s Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection, the RISD Museum, and the collection of Vincent J. Buonanno (Brown ’66). The exhibition features prints and books that record how cities were transformed by the urban festivals of early modern Europe. The Festive City originated in an undergraduate seminar taught at Brown in Spring 2012. It was co-curated by RISD curator Emily Peters and Brown University professor Evelyn Lincoln. Students working with Professor Andries van Dam collaborated with the RISD Museum graphics and computing staff and used Microsoft Surface technology to make pages of the festival books available to viewers.

Persian Paintings from the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection
Now through May 10, 2013
John Hay Library, Bopp Seminar Room (3rd Floor)
Accompanying the course “What is Islamic Art” with instructor Shiva Balaghi, selections from the Library’s Special Collections, including 10 illuminated gouache miniatures depicting military scenes and leaves from illuminated manuscripts, are on display. Stop by to examine these unique, historical works.

2013: Verdi Year Wagner Year
Now through late-May 2013
Orwig Music Library
The year 2013 is the 200th anniversary of two of the most central nineteenth-century opera composers: Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. Although they never met and their lives took very different courses, each came to be emblematic of the national music of their home countries: Wagner and Germany, Verdi and Italy. Modern reinterpretations of their operas have stretched the limits of human imagination, and remain critically controversial. In this exhibit, Orwig celebrates its collections relating to both of these composers, highlighting the acquisition of a new Tristan und Isolde facsimile manuscript in December 2012.

Centennial Images: The Balkan Wars, 1912–1913
February 18 – May 10, 2013
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Foyer
Prints and watercolors of military scenes from the Balkan Wars of 1912 and 1913 will be on view in the Foyer of the Rock. Make sure to take a firsthand peek at these special materials from the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection. You can also explore the collections online.

Stamps of the European Microstates: Andorra, Liechtenstein, Monaco, San Marino, & Vatican City
February 25 – May 18, 2013
John Hay Library, Military Collection Gallery (3rd Floor)
Stop by the galleries on the third floor of the John Hay Library to view a display of European stamps from the Webster Knight and Champlin Stamp Collections. While you’re there, make sure to explore the permanent exhibit of 5,000 miniature military soldiers. The soldiers are set in 96 cases marching from left to right, starting with ancient Egyptians and leading up to Queen Elizabeth II.

A Picture of Avant-Garde Russia: The Rite of Spring and the Ballets Russes in 1913, Selections from the Bryson Dance Collection
Monday, March 4 – May 31, 2013
John Hay Library, Gammell Gallery
This year marks the 100th anniversary of Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, a work commissioned for the Ballets Russes in Paris. With the music, choreography, sets and costumes all designed by Russian artists on a Russian theme, and the production under the direction of the renowned Russian impresario Sergei Diaghilev, the Rite of Spring gave Paris a taste of modernism in a distinctively Russian key. This Spring exhibition celebrates the artistic innovations of the Rite with a selection of works illuminating the original Paris production of 1913, drawn from the Brown University Library’s Bryson Dance Collection. This exhibit is one of a series of events taking place in Rhode Island this spring to mark the FirstWorks presentation of the Joffrey Ballet’s recreation of the original ballet; the Joffrey’s performance will take place on March 19th at the Providence Performing Arts Center. Also included in the series of events is a public discussion at the Providence Athenaeum on March 1st of the political and cultural context from which the Rite of Spring grew.

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913


Screening of Lincoln (2012) and Q&A with Michael Vorenberg

Providence, RI [Brown University] – The Brown University Library, the Office of Public Affairs and University Relations, and the Center for the Study of Slavery & Justice will host a complimentary public screening of DreamWorks’ LINCOLN on March 1, 2013, in belated celebration of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The screening, which will be followed by a Q&A with Michael Vorenberg, Associate Professor of History at Brown, and author of Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment, will begin at 5:30pm in The Martinos Auditorium at the Granoff Center, 154 Angell St. This event is open to the public. Seating is limited and tickets are required. Seats will be held for ticketed attendees until 5:20pm on March 1, at which point remaining seats will be released to patrons at the door on a first-come, first-serve basis. Reserve your tickets today.

Steven Spielberg directs two-time Academy Award® winner Daniel Day-Lewis in “Lincoln,” a revealing drama that focuses on the 16th President’s tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, James Spader, Hal Holbrook and Tommy Lee Jones, “Lincoln” is produced by Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy, with a screenplay by Tony Kushner, based in part on the book “Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln” by Doris Kearns Goodwin. As Spielberg explains, “I wanted to tell a story about Lincoln that would avoid the mistakes of both cynicism and hero worship and be true to the vastness of who he was and the intimacy of his life and the softer angles of his nature.” For Goodwin Lincoln’s humanity was key, “It was really important to me that Lincoln’s sense of humor come across in the movie and that was built into the script and Daniel’s performance.” Kushner, who described writing the screenplay as “an act of interpretation,” worked to appropriately portray the emergency powers which Lincoln claimed during the war noting that “Unquestionably, Lincoln stretched the balance of powers in unprecedented ways–but out of necessity as he saw it to prosecute the war effectively and hold the Union together. Occasionally, I think he went beyond where he was sure the courts would follow. These are further questions of means and ends that are very much at the heart of the film we’ve made.” LINCOLN has received 12 Academy Award® nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Daniel Day Lewis), Best Supporting Actress (Sally Field) and Best Supporting Actor (Tommy Lee Jones).

Michael Vorenberg, who will host the Q&A following the screening, is an Associate Professor of History at Brown, with specific interests in the intersections of American history: Civil War and Reconstruction, Legal and Constitutional History, and Slavery, Emancipation, and Race. His first book, Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment was published by Cambridge University Press in 2001. He is also the author of The Emancipation Proclamation: A Brief History with Documents, forthcoming, and is at work on a book about the impact of the Civil War on American citizenship. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. From 2004 to 2007, he was a member of Brown University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice. He currently is a member of the Advisory Committee of the United States Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial and is on the Board of Editors of Law and History Review.

For those interested in researching Lincoln, Brown University’s John Hay Library is home to the largest Lincoln collection in an academic library.  The Charles Woodberry McLellan Collection of Lincolniana is comprised of 30,000+ items by and about Abraham Lincoln, and about the historical and political context of his life and career, chiefly the U.S. Civil War and its causes and aftermath. The collection was acquired for Brown by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Class of 1897, and others, in memory of John Hay, Class of 1858, one of Lincoln’s White House secretaries (featured in LINCOLN). The collection, which has since increased to more than five times its original size, includes almost 1,000 letters, notes, and documents in Lincoln’s hand; thousands of volumes of contemporary and later publications relating to the Civil War and the slavery controversy; titles of books that Lincoln read; material relating to Lincoln’s family and associates; song sheets, broadsides, ballots, prints, and posters; newspapers from 1860-1865; most of the known photographs of Lincoln; oil portraits by artists of Lincoln’s day; original drawings; statues; over 550 medals, mourning and campaign badges; coins; and postage stamps. High quality digital surrogates of collections materials are also available online, along with contextual information including essays, timelines, biographies, and historical vignettes.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

###

Student Models from “City and Cinema” on View at the Rock!

Brown Undergraduate Ian Slater's the Bates House from Psycho, 1960. Director: Alfred Hitchcock.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —If you are on the Brown University campus in January, stop by the new exhibit in the Finn Reading Room on the first floor of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library!

In fall 2012, Professor Dietrich Neumann taught a course at Brown in the Department of Art and Architecture entitled “City and Cinema.”

The course explored chapters in the history of cinematic set design and film’s interaction with and depiction of urban space, examining film as a reflection, commentary, and experimental laboratory for contemporary architecture.

The exhibit on view in the Rock features researched models submitted by Brown undergraduate students as final projects for the course.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world.

RISD Museum Exhibit Features Brown University Library’s Special Collections

Fig. 7, Blondel from the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection of the Brown University Library

Providence, RI [Brown University] The Festive City is now on view at RISD Museum, featuring materials from the Anne S.K. Brown Military Collection at the Brown University Library, the RISD Museum, and the collection of Vincent J. Buonanno (Brown, ’66). The exhibit is open through July 14, 2013 in the Buonanno Works on Paper and Tsiaris Photography Galleries.

The Festive City features prints and books that record how cities were transformed by the urban festivals of early modern Europe.  The exhibition originated in an undergraduate seminar taught in Brown’s Department of the History of Art & Architecture in Spring, 2012. It was co-curated by RISD curator Emily Peters and Brown University professor Evelyn Lincoln.  In addition, students working with Professor Andries van Dam collaborated with the RISD Museum graphics and computing staff and used Microsoft Surface technology to make more pages of the festival books available to viewers.

The books and prints on view in this exhibition ensured that the grandeur and significance of ephemeral festivals extended beyond their immediate moment and locality. Expensive to produce, festival books were given by the sponsor to advantageous connections at foreign European courts and city governments or purchased for private libraries by wealthy collectors. The experience of paging through such weighty volumes and opening their large, fold-out plates was interactive and immersive, an event enjoyed in groups while reading aloud. Single-leaf festival prints, also on view, were made more quickly to document important political events. Both provided sought-after information, with their visual and textual inventories of every firework and piece of velvet clothing, and enumeration of every structure, its size, and materials. The products of unified, collective effort, the splendid works in this exhibition represent European cities at the pinnacle of collaborative artistic production.

There will be a day-long symposium about these works at the RISD Museum on March 1, 2013 (registration required).

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

World-Famous Thriller Writers Coming to Brown!

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —At 6:30pm on November 15, 2012, Brown University Library will host a panel discussion featuring several of America’s most successful and renowned thriller writers. Author Jon Land ’79, will moderate the discussion between David Baldacci, Steve Berry, Neslon DeMille, Lisa Gardner, and R.L. Stine in Salomon Hall.  A book signing and reception will follow in Sayles Hall. The Thriller Panel is supported by Friends of the Library, Brown University Library, Brown University Bookstore, and Brown’s Office of University Event and Conference Services.

The program, book signing, and reception are free and open to the public. No registration required. Doors open at 5:45pm. Brown University Bookstore will sell books by all authors at the reception in Sayles Hall.

Thanks to the work of Jon Land, author, Friends of the Library board member, Providence resident, and Vice-President of Marketing for the International Thriller Writers, Brown University is currently establishing a Thriller Archive. Land wrote his first thriller as a senior thesis in English at Brown. Today he is a critically acclaimed and bestselling author of 32 books. Land has already donated his manuscripts to the Hay, and more donations will follow.

Land spearheaded the planning for the Thriller Panel as a kick-off for the archive. As he explained, “These incredibly successful authors represent an amazing range of thrillers from action, to political, to psychological suspense to young adult and even children’s.  I can’t think of a better way to celebrate the thriller genre in general, and the collection to be housed at our own John Hay Library in particular.”

David Baldacci
David Baldacci made a splash on the literary scene in 1996 with the publication of his first novel, Absolute Power. A major motion picture adaptation followed, with Clint Eastwood as director and star.  Baldacci has published 24 novels, all of which have been national and international bestsellers.  His novels have been translated into more than 45 languages and sold in more than 80 countries; over 110 million copies are in print worldwide. Baldacci has also published two children’s books.  Most recently, he was inducted into the 2011 International Crime Writing Hall of Fame and received the 2012 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award. Baldacci is involved with several philanthropic organizations. His greatest efforts are dedicated to his family’s Wish You Well Foundation®. Established with his wife, the Foundation supports family and adult literacy in the United States by fostering and promoting the development and expansion of new and existing literacy and educational programs. In 2008 the Foundation partnered with Feeding America to launch Feeding Body & Mind, a program to address the connection between literacy, poverty, and hunger. Baldacci and his wife are the very proud parents of two terrific teenagers, and the generally proud owners of two not-so-well-behaved Labradoodles. They live in Northern Virginia.

Steve Berry
Steve Berry’s books have been translated into 40 languages with more than 14 million printed copies in 51 countries.  His work consistently appears in the top echelon of The New York Times, USA Today, and Indie bestseller lists. History lies at the heart of every Steve Berry novel, a passion he shares with his wife, which led them to create History Matters, a foundation dedicated to historic preservation. Since 2009, the couple has crossed the country to save endangered historic treasures, raising money via lectures, receptions, galas, luncheons, dinners, and their popular writers’ workshops. In 2012, the American Library Association recognized Berry’s devotion to historic preservation naming him the first spokesman for National Preservation Week.  Berry is also a recipient of the Royden B. Davis Distinguished Author Award, and a founding member of International Thriller Writers—serving three years as its co-president. Berry’s best-selling novels include: The Columbus Affair, The Jefferson Key, The Emperor’s Tomb, The Paris Vendetta, The Charlemagne Pursuit, The Venetian Betrayal, The Alexandria Link, The Templar Legacy, The Third Secret, The Romanov Prophecy, and The Amber Room.

Nelson DeMille
Nelson DeMille is a former U.S. Army lieutenant who served in Vietnam and is the author of sixteen acclaimed novels, including the #1 New York Times bestsellers Night Fall, Plum Island, and The Gate House. His other New York Times bestsellers include The Charm School, Word of Honor, The Gold Coast, Spencerville, The Lion’s Game, The Lion, Up Country, Wild Fire, and The General’s Daughter, which was a major motion picture starring John Travolta. He co-authored Mayday with Thomas Block and has also contributed short stories, book reviews, and articles to magazines and newspapers. DeMille is a member of The Authors Guild, the Mystery Writers of America, and American Mensa. He has three children and lives on Long Island.

Lisa Gardner
The New York Times #1 best-selling suspense novelist Lisa Gardner began her career in food service. After catching her hair on fire, she focused on writing instead.  Over 16 million copies of Gardner’s books are now in circulation, along with four movies. In 2010, Gardner’s The Neighbor received the award for Best Hardcover Novel from the International Thriller Writers and was named to the American Library Association’s “Best Adrenaline Novel Reading List.” Her latest novel, Catch Me, is the most recent addition to her Detective D.D. Warren series, set in Boston, MA. Gardner’s other works include the FBI Profiler Series, The Other Daughter, The Survivors Club, and I’d Kill For That.  A one-time Rhode Island resident, Gardner now lives in the mountains of New Hampshire with her race-car driving husband, speed-skiing daughter, two extremely barky dogs, and one incredibly hostile cat.

R.L. Stine
R.L. Stine is one of America’s best-selling authors and is cited in The Guinness Book of World Records as the best-selling series author in history. Over the past 20 years, Stine’s Goosebumps series has sold over 300 million copies in the United States alone and has become a publishing phenomenon in 32 languages around the world. Stine’s other popular children’s book series include Fear Street, Mostly Ghostly, The Nightmare Room, and Rotten School. In 2012, R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour, an anthology TV series of horror stories for the whole family, began its third season on The Hub TV Network, while the original Goosebumps TV episodes continue to air daily. In October 2012, Stine will publish Red Rain through Touchstone Books, a horror novel aimed at adult readers. Stine’s previous adult novels include: Superstitious, published by Warner Books, and The Sitter and Eye Candy, published by Ballantine Books. Stine lives in New York City with his wife Jane, an editor and publisher.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

###

Stoddard Fest of Early American Poetry – October 24 and 25!

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Roger E. Stoddard, Brown class of 1957, and former curator of the Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays at Brown University Library, will be featured at a series of events on October 24 and 25 at the John Carter Brown Library and John Hay Library.

Lunch talk at John Carter Brown Library: At 12:30pm, on Wednesday, October 24, Stoddard will discuss his time at the John Carter Brown Library with the talk “The education of a bibliographer by Lawrence Wroth” as part of the JCB’s Wednesday Fellows’ Lunch Talk series.

Bibliography workshop at John Hay Library:  On Thursday, October 25, from 2-4pm in the Bopp Seminar Room at the John Hay Library, Stoddard will lead a bibliography workshop, focusing on early American imprints of poetry from the Library’s Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays. Workshop participation is limited to 20;  please sign up in advance by emailing Rosemary_Cullen@brown.edu

Evening lecture at John Hay Library: At 7pm on Thursday, October 25, in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library Stoddard will present “How I discovered that Brown is the University of books.” This talk will examine his research that contributed to his recently published descriptive bibliography of early American poetry, A Bibliographical Description of Books and Pamphlets of American verse Printed from 1610 Through 1820, which he began compiling forty years ago at the John Hay Library.

Exhibition: An exhibit of early American poetry, The Work of a Lifetime:  Roger Stoddard, Early American Poetry, and the Collections of the Libraries at Brown University, curated by Stoddard will be on view October 12 through December 14 in the John Hay Library’s Gammell Gallery and North Gallery exhibition rooms.

These events are free and open to the public.

Contact: Rosemary L. Cullen | 401-863-1514 | Rosemary_Cullen@brown.edu


Abraham Lincoln’s 1860 Campaign Biographies and the Lincoln Image

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — On November 1, at 5:30pm in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, Director of Special Collections and the John Hay Library, Thomas Horrocks, will give a talk on Abraham Lincoln’s 1860 campaign biographies and the role they played in shaping the Lincoln image. Campaign biographies from the Hay’s McLellan-Lincoln Collection will be on view before and after the talk. A reception will follow. This event and reception are free and open to the public.

The genre of campaign biographies emerged during the 1824 presidential campaign between Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams. Every presidential campaign since, including those of recent memory in which TV, film, the autobiography, and the Internet and social media have played increasingly influential roles, has had its share of candidate biographies. Promoting presidential candidates through published biographies — as well as through other genres of print, parades, and speeches — was especially important in Lincoln’s time due to the accepted tradition that candidates did not openly seek office.  At that time, promotion of a candidate was left to others, the party, partisan newspapers and their editors, and to commercial firms. In order to make an informed choice, American voters had at their disposal several sources of information, including various genres of print about the candidates.

Nineteenth-century campaign biographies, however, provided in one place the most extensive information on a candidate’s life, character, and qualifications for the presidency.  These biographies, written by experienced journalists, hack writers, and budding literary figures, generally adhered to a formula when presenting candidates’ lives.  They were essentially propaganda pieces intended to present a candidate in the best possible light, and to create a positive image that would resonate with the American people. As such, Lincoln’s campaign biographies reflect what personal qualities nineteenth-century Americans considered essential to successful leadership.

In 1923, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Class of 1897 purchased the McLellan Lincoln Collection, one of the five most distinguished Lincoln collections in the world, for Brown University.  The McLellan Collection has been supplemented over the years by major gifts, and has increased to more than five times its original size. Most recently, the collection has been the beneficiary of the interest and attention of Douglas W. Squires, Class of 1973. Today the collection comprises 30,000+ items in various media, of materials by and about Abraham Lincoln, and about the historical and political context of his life and career, chiefly the U.S. Civil War and its causes and aftermath.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

Announcing the Brasiliana Collection at Brown University

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —  At 6pm, on October 24, 2012, Brown University will launch the Brasiliana Collection and feature the newly indexed Thomas E. Skidmore Papers, an anchor of the collection in the Reading Room of the John Hay Library. A display will be on view including highlights of the Brasiliana Collection, items from the Skidmore Papers, and the new companion website to Skidmore’s textbook Brazil: Five Centuries of Change (Oxford University Press). A reception will follow. The collection launch is co-organized by Brown University Library, Brown’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and the departments of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at Brown. The event is free and open to the public.

The Brasiliana Collection at Brown is an initiative conceived and directed by James Green, Professor of History and Brazilian Studies. The collection is intended to support the growing interest in Brazilian studies among students and faculty at Brown as well as scholars around the world.

Special collection strengths include: Brazilian travelogues: travel accounts, 16th-19th century; early literary criticism on Machado de Assis; pamphlets from the Positivist Church of Brazil; books on Espiritismo; Literatura de cordel (Brazilian chapbooks); personal papers of scholars in the field, and the World Newspaper Archive Latin American Newspapers 1805-1922. The Circulating collection is especially strong in 19th-21stcentury novels and history: colonial, slavery, abolition, independence, and dictatorship period.

In April 2006, Professor Thomas E. Skidmore donated his personal library and papers to Brown University Library. The monograph collection consists of approximately 6,000 items, mainly in English and Portuguese language, and reflects over thirty years of collecting 19th- and 20th-century materials on Brazil and other areas of Latin America. The collection contains numerous Brazilian rare and special books on subjects related to race, nationalism, politics, economics, and Brazilian history. The new website Brazil: Five Centuries of Change includes an inventory of the collection, and an archive, developed with Brown students over the last two years.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Patricia Figueroa Curator, Iberian and Latin American Collections | Patricia_Figueroa@Brown.edu

Nobel Prize Winner Mo Yan’s Works On Exhibit

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —  On October 11, 2012, Chinese Author Mo Yan was awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature. In celebration of Mo Yan’s award, Brown University Library’s East Asian Curator, Li Wang, selected a number of Mo Yan’s works in Chinese and English translation for display in the Gardner Room (room 311) on the third floor of the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library.

Born in 1955 in a farmer’s family in Shandong province, Mo Yan (pseudonym of Guan Moye) wrote more than 30 novels and other books.  One of his best known novels, “Red Sorghum” (VHS copy available in the Library) was revised as a reward-winning movie in 1987, directed by Zhang Yimou.  A number of Mo Yan’s books have been translated into English, French, Spanish, German, and Swedish.

The Brown University Library’s English titles include Red Sorghum: A Novel of China (1993), The Garlic Ballads (1995), The Republic of Wine: A Novel (2000), Do Anything for A Laugh (2001), Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out: A Novel (2008).  The exhibit also features the Chinese works: Shifu, You’ll Shisan bu (十三步) (“Thirteen Steps”, 1989), Fengru feitun (丰乳肥臀) (“Big Breasts and Wide Hips”, 1996), Tanxiang xing (檀香刑) (“Sandalwood Death”, 2001), Muzhi kao (拇指铐) (“Thumb-cuffs”, 2008), and Wa (蛙) (“Frog”, 2009). Several English books that contain selected works by Mo Yan, and posters from the movie “Red Sorghum” in the magazine “Popular Cinema,” are also on display.

More works by Mo Yan will be added. The display is on view through October 19, between 9am and 5pm.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913

 

 

Brown University Library Opens The Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab!

Rendering of New Lab

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — This October, the Brown University Library celebrates the opening of The Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library. The Lab is made possible thanks to the generosity of Mr. Patrick Ma, P’14, who is based in Hong Kong, China, Brown Trustee Cathy Halstead, and an anonymous donor.

Installing a panel of the video wall

The Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab features a large scale visualization video wall comprised of twelve 55 inch high resolution LED screens, creating a 7 x 16 foot display with a combined resolution of over 24 megapixels, offering high quality viewing and analytical space not publicly available elsewhere on campus.  The Lab is also outfitted with a wide range of software for scholars across the disciplines, a surround sound audio system, video-conferencing capabilities, specialized lighting, and several individual touch screen monitors that can be used independently or linked to the video wall for collaborative display and interaction.

Finishing touches to video wall

Patrick Rashleigh, the Library’s newly appointed Data Visualization Coordinator, will oversee the operation of the Lab, provide instruction and outreach to faculty, students, and interdisciplinary campus groups and support individual and course-based visualization projects. Rashleigh previously served as the Faculty Technology Liaison for the Humanities in the Research and Instruction group at Wheaton College; and Senior New Media Coordinator for the Attorney General of Ontario.

View of Digital Scholarship Lab under construction

As Joukowsky Family University Librarian Harriette Hemmasi explained, “The Brown University Library is a physical and virtual space for experimentation, production, and processing of new knowledge. The new Lab will provide necessary tools for faculty and staff to explore and define scholarly forms beyond their current capabilities.”

More information about the Lab’s opening and programming will be available later this month.

The Brown University Library is home to more than 6.8 million print items, plus a multitude of electronic resources and expanding digital archives serving the teaching, research, and learning needs of Brown students and faculty, as well as scholars from around the country and the world. http://library.brown.edu/

Contact: Jennifer Braga |  401-863-6913