Event | Snapchat and the SnapMap: Collective, Ephemeral Stories about Public Events with Jill Rettberg

On Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 4 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Jill Rettberg will give a talk entitled, “Snapchat and the SnapMap: Collective, Ephemeral Stories about Public Events.” This event is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow the talk.

On Snapchat, you can view “Stories” about specific events or locations that consist of a sequence of snaps from different users. Some Stories are curated and carefully composed by Snapchat’s staff, like the Live Stories about Trump’s inauguration and the Women’s March the following day. Others are automatically generated, and and be viewed by browsing the SnapMap or doing a text search. The Stories are ephemeral, disappearing from the platform after 24 hours.

In this talk, Jill Walker Rettberg discusses these stories as public yet ephemeral media on a closed, proprietary platform. If, as Wendy Chun has argued, digital media are inherently ephemeral, then Snapchat is eminently digital. But we are used to public media being archived and accessible to researchers. What does it mean that Snapchat is creating curated and algorithmically generated stories about everyday and extraordinary events? How should we think about a new media genre that is seen by tens of millions of viewers, but that disappears after 24 hours? Should libraries be archiving this material?

Jill Walker Rettberg is professor of digital culture at the University of Bergen in Norway. Her main research topic has been storytelling and self-representation in social media, building upon a foundation of digital art, electronic literature and digital humanities. Her recent work has made use of digital methods to visualize network relationships in electronic literature and the digital humanities. Rettberg is currently focusing on visual technologies and machine vision and our relationship with them. She is a visiting scholar at MIT from August-December 2017, where she is writing a book titled Snapchat: Visual, Ephemeral and Conversational Social Media. It is under contract with Polity Press to be published in 2018 or 2019.

Professor Rettberg’s previous book Seeing Ourselves Through Technology: How We Use Selfies, Blogs and Wearable Devices to See and Shape Ourselves was published as an open access monograph by Palgrave in October 2014, and can be freely downloaded. Her book Blogging was published in a 2nd edition by Polity Press in 2014, and she has also co-edited an anthology of critical writing on World of Warcraft (MIT Press 2008).

Date: November 29, 2017
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Event | Combinatory Poetics in Electronic Literature and Cinema with Scott Rettberg

On Monday, November 20, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Scott Rettberg will give a talk entitled, “Combinatory Poetics in Electronic Literature and Cinema.” This event is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow the talk.

Aleatory and combinatory poetic methods have been an ongoing concern of the avant-garde stretching back to the early 20th century, and have crystallized as one of the main threads of practice in electronic literature. Scott Rettberg will discuss how an interest in combinatory poetics reflected first in projects such as the poetry generators “Frequency,” “Tokyo Garage,” and “After Parthenope” emerged in collaborations with Roderick Coover and Nick Montfort in the combinatory film “Three Rails Live” and subsequently with Coover the feature-length combinatory film “Toxi*City” and the new work-in-progress (recently filmed in Ireland) “Circe.”

Scott Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture in the Department of Linguistic, Literary, and Aesthetic Studies at the University of Bergen, Norway. He holds a Ph.D. in English and is the author or co-author of novel-length works of electronic literature including The Unknown, Kind of Blue, Implementation, Toxi*City, Hearts and Minds: The Interrogations Project·—winner of the 2016 Robert Coover award for a work of electronic literature—and others. His creative work has been exhibited online and at art venues around the world, including the Venice Biennale, the Nobel Peace Prize Forum, ISEA, the Santa Monica Museum in Barcelona, the Beall Center, the Slought Foundation, the Krannert Art Museum, and elsewhere. Rettberg is the cofounder and served as the first executive director of the nonprofit Electronic Literature Organization.

Date: November 20, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Rockefeller Library Space Closures | CNI-ARL Digital Scholarship Planning Workshop

From Wednesday, November 8 through Friday, November 10, 2017, the Brown University Library will host the CNI-ARL Digital Scholarship Planning Workshop at the Rockefeller Library. During this time, some of the spaces in the Rock will be unavailable.

You will be able to access the stacks in every area of the Rock. 

These spaces will be unavailable during the workshop:

Wednesday, November 8th:

  • Absolute Quiet Room and Side Room (all day)
  • Finn Reading Room (3 – 7 p.m.)

Thursday, November 9th:

  • Absolute Quiet Room and Side Room (all day)
  • Conference table area next to the art books on Level A (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Study area under the artichoke lights on Level A (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Room A42 on Level A (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Seminar Room 160 (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Consultation Room 158 (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Conference Room 134C (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Glass Conference Room 131 (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Glass Conference Room 133 (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Finn Reading Room (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
  • Sorensen Family Reading Room (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)

Friday, November 10th:

  • Absolute Quiet Room and Side Room (8 a.m. – 6 p.m.)
  • Conference table area next to the art books on Level A (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Study area under the artichoke lights on Level A (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Rom A42 on Level A (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Seminar Room 160 (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Consultation Room 158 (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Conference Room 134C (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Glass Conference Room 131 (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Glass Conference Room 133 (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Finn Reading Room (8 – 11 a.m.)
  • Sorensen Family Reading Room (8 – 11 a.m.)

The upper floors of the Rock will be completely open and available and the Rock will operate under its normal hours. All other libraries will be open as usual.

Thank you for your understanding!

Event | Stars in his pocket… : A Conversation with Samuel R. Delany & Kara Keeling

On Wednesday, November 8, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, join us for “Stars in his pocket… : A Conversation with Samuel R. Delany and Kara Keeling.” The event will include an exhibit of Samuel Delany’s works and manuscripts from the Library’s collection. Free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Sponsored by the Brown University Library, the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of Fine Arts, the Brown Arts Initiative Fitt Artist-in-Residence Grants Program, the Department of Modern Culture and Media, and the Department of English, this event is part of Samuel Delany’s residency at Brown from November 6 – 10, 2017.

Samuel R. Delany

Samuel Delany is a highly laureled writer of science fiction and cultural criticism, in which he explores questions of sexuality, gender, race, language, perception, and the fluctuating conceptions of “the human.” His prodigious literary talents are intimately informed by his experiences as a gay black man, the grandson of a freed slave and nephew of famous civil rights workers. He is also an acute observer of off-the-grid urban spaces, the textures of micro-neighborhoods, and queer locations.

Kara Keeling

Kara Keeling is Visiting Associate Professor of Modern Culture and Media. Keeling’s research has focused on African American film, theories of race, sexuality, and gender in cinema, critical theory, and cultural studies. Her current research involves issues of temporality, media and black and queer cultural politics; digital media, globalization, and difference; and Gilles Deleuze and liberation theory. Keeling’s book, The Witch’s Flight: The Cinematic, the Black Femme, and the Image of Common Sense (Duke University Press, 2007), explores the role of cinematic images in the construction and maintenance of hegemonic conceptions of the world and interrogates the complex relationships between cinematic visibility, minority politics, and the labor required to create and maintain alternative organizations of social life. She is co-editor (with Colin MacCabe and Cornel West) of a selection of writings by the late James A. Snead entitled European Pedigrees/ African Contagions: Racist Traces and Other Writing and author of several articles that have appeared in the journals Qui Parle, The Black ScholarWomen and Performance, and elsewhere.

Date: November 8, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, Second Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street

Panel | Providing Global and Open Access to Research Publications and Primary Research Materials

On Tuesday, October 31, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, come and celebrate International Open Access Week by attending a panel discussion and learning about two scholars who are providing global and open access online to research publications, primary data, and educational resources. The Open Access Movement encompasses making available online to the public research publications, resources, data, and tools that are free of many legal, financial (paywalls), and technical barriers and can be fully used, shared, and adapted. Light refreshments will be served.

Panelists:

  • James Green, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes Professor of Modern Latin American History and Director of the Brazil Initiative
  • Carlos Pittella, visiting scholar in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies

Panel Description:

Professor James Green

Professor Green will discuss Opening the Archives, a joint effort he is leading with the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, the Universidade Estadual de Maringá (Paraná, Brazil), and the Brazilian National Archives to digitize and index the U.S. government documents on Brazil between 1960-80 in the Library’s Digital Repository (BDR) and to make them available to the public on an open-access website.

 

 

Dr. Carlos Pitella

Dr. Pittella will discuss his project involving partnering with the Library’s Digital Repository (BDR) to disseminate and preserve access online to four open access, Portuguese and Brazilian Studies journals, including Pessoa Plural, an international journal dedicated to advancing criticism and scholarship on the poet Fernando Pessoa that is co-published by Brown, the University of Warwick, and the Universidad de los Andes.

Drs. Green and Pittella will provide models of ways that Brown students and faculty can partner with the Library on open access endeavors and raise awareness about the importance of open access to research publications and data on a global scale. Join us for this enlightening discussion!

Date: October 31, 2017
Time: 12 – 1 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street

Events | Mellon-Funded Digital Publishing Initiative Workshops

This fall, Brown University Library and the Program in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (REMS) will host a series of interactive, interdisciplinary workshops on digital humanities scholarship for undergraduates, featuring two pilot projects selected for Brown’s Digital Publishing Initiative, generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The REMS Program offers students many opportunities to work with centuries-old books and pictures in some very modern ways, uncovering exciting research questions in the humanities, history, and the social sciences along the way.

Books without Pages: Project Atalanta

The first workshop, “Books without Pages: Project Atalanta,” will take place on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 12 p.m. Project Atalanta brings to life in digital form a multimedia seventeenth-century text, Michael Maier’s alchemical emblem book, Atalanta fugiens. The publication will consist of a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of the early modern book, including recordings of its fifty fugues, as well as a critical anthology of media-rich interpretative essays. Associate Professor of History Tara Nummedal, Digital Scholarship Editor Allison Levy, and Designer for Online Publications Crystal Brusch, along with the graduate and undergraduate students who have been working on the project, will present material from the digital project in conjunction with an evaluation of the printed early modern book from the John Hay Library.

Journey into the New World and Other Tales of Forgotten (Early) Modern Media

The second workshop, “Journey into the New World and Other Tales of Forgotten (Early) Modern Media,” will take place on Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 12 p.m. Professor of Italian Studies Massimo Riva, Digital Scholarship Editor Allison Levy, and Designer for Online Publications Crystal Brusch will introduce undergraduates to the wonders of time travel by exploring several examples of analog media from the pre-digital age. How can popular forms of entertainment from centuries ago, such as the cosmorama, the magic lantern, or the “moving panorama,” help us better understand our own “brave new world” – our digital visual culture? This workshop will revolve around a set of digital simulations of eighteenth-century optical devices being designed for this project.

Both events will take place in the Digital Scholarship Lab on the first floor of Rockefeller Library. A short reception will follow.

Dates: October 26 and November 1, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street

Event | A Conversation about Stephen Mopope, Kiowa Artist

Mopope, Stephen, “Sun prayer” (1931). Stephen Mopope paintings of seven Native American subjects. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library.

On Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 2 p.m., the Library will host a talk with Kiowa elder Vanessa Paukeigope Jennings, granddaughter of Stephen Mopope (1898-1974), about her grandfather’s life and work. Seven original paintings by Stephen Mopope held in the collections of the Brown University Library will be on display for this event.

The talk will take place in the Lownes Room on the second floor of the John Hay Library. A reception will follow in the Hay Lobby.

Date: October 25, 2017
Time: 2 p.m.
Location: Lownes Room, Second Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street

Related event:

On Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. in room 015 at 85 Waterman Street, the Haffenreffer Museum will host a talk with Vanessa Jennings about her own work as an artist and designer in preserving Kiowa cultural traditions.

Event | Li Wang: A Trip to Cultural China 2017

Mt. Wutai, Buddhist sacred mountain

On Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, East Asian Curator Li Wang, Ph.D., will give a talk, “A Trip to Cultural China 2017.”

This is a new presentation on a series of talks in recent years at the Brown Library, sharing what Li has seen, heard, and experienced on his fruitful trips to China. The topic of this year is about “Cultural China,” in which he will focus on the pilgrimage tradition of Mt. Wutai, the primary Chinese Buddhist sacred mountain in Shanxi Province and the splendid cultural heritage of the Forbidden City in Beijing, as well as the fascinating art works of “China Museums Creativity” at the 2017 Beijing International Book Fair, the second largest book fair in the world, among other conferences and events he attended, and more.

This event is free and open to the public. Coffee and cookies will be served.

Date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Time: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Dante in Real Time

On Monday, December 4, 2017 at 12 p.m., the Brown University Library and the Program in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (REMS), as part of the Journeys to the Early Modern World in Brown’s Libraries fall series, will present an hour-long workshop, “Dante in Real Time,” designed to introduce undergraduates to the extraordinary possibilities for undertaking engaged research among our special collections.

Dante’s Divine Comedy recounts the poet’s journey through the afterlife and back. From hybrid beasts and fearsome devils to friends and foes, Dante’s world has inspired generations of readers to envision what lay beyond the known world.

In this hands-on workshop, Christopher Geissler, Director of the John Hay Library, and Zoe Langer, 2017 Hay Interdisciplinary Fellow, will view different responses to Dante’s poem, including sixteenth-century maps of Hell and illustrations by Gustave Doré. The Chambers Dante Collection allows us to experience Dante’s poem as its readers encountered it through the centuries and to see how REMS students, working closely with literature, languages, and book illustration, can discover remarkable questions lurking in very old books.

“Dante in Real Time” will take place at 12 p.m. in the Bopp Seminar Room on the third floor of the John Hay Library. A short reception will follow.

Date: Monday, December 4, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Bopp Seminar Room, Third Floor, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street

Event | The Choreography of Things with Sydney Skybetter

On Thursday, December 7, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, Sydney Skybetter, Lecturer of Dance and Fellow of Public Humanities at Brown, will give a talk entitled, “The Choreography of Things.” This event is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow.

Skybetter will discuss his research into ways that movement generates meaning, for people and for machines. By tracing the commingling histories of dance notation and affective computing, exploring a gamut of emerging technologies (including drone swarms, artificial intelligence, self-driving cars and robots) and ranting about the premonitionary qualities of the movie Minority Report, Skybetter will argue for the importance of choreographic method and metaphor for our emerging technological future. 

Sydney Skybetter is a choreographer. Hailed by Dance Magazine as “One of the most influential people in dance today,” his work has been performed around the country at such venues as The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Boston Center for the Arts, Jacob’s Pillow and The Joyce Theater. He has consulted on issues of cultural change and technology for The National Ballet of Canada, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Hasbro, New York University and The University of Southern California, among others. A sought-after speaker, he lectures on everything from dance history to cultural futurism, most recently at Harvard University, South by Southwest Interactive, TEDx, Saatchi and Saatchi, Dance/USA, NYU and MVR5. He is a Public Humanities Fellow and Lecturer at Brown University, where he researches the problematics of human computer interfaces and mixed reality systems. He is the founder of the Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces (CRCI), which convenes ethnographers, anthropologists, speculative designers and performing artists to discuss the choreography of the Internet of Things. He produces shows at Joe’s Pub, SteelStacks and OBERON with DanceNOW[NYC], has served as a Grant Panelist for the National Endowment of the Arts, is a Curatorial Advisor for Fractured Atlas’ Exponential Creativity Fund, and is the winner of a RISCA Fellowship in Choreography from the State of Rhode Island. He received his MFA in Choreography from New York University.

www.skybetter.org

Date: Thursday, December 7, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence