Retweets, Shares, and Likes: Increasing the Impact of Research Through the Preservation and Sharing of Data

Justine Allen, Derya Akkaynak (from http://news.brown.edu/articles/2017/05/cuttlefish)

Last week, an article co-authored by Dr. Justine Allen appeared in the scientific journal The American Naturalist. Dr. Allen received her Ph.D. from Brown University in 2014, completing her graduate work under Professor Roger Hanlon at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA. The article describes the behaviors of two male cuttlefish fighting over a female mate, behaviors that were recorded on video and in photographs taken by the authors while on a dive off the coast of Turkey. The video has since been seen tens of thousands of times, demonstrating the impact of research through the preservation and sharing of data.

To view Dr. Allen and her co-authors’ data in the BDR please visit:

Akkaynak, Derya, and Allen, Justine J., “Dramatic fighting by male cuttlefish for a female mate” (2011). Data for Publications. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library.https://doi.org/10.7301/Z0PR7SX4.

In order to analyze the recorded behaviors, the researchers created a scoring guide to document the types and characteristics of the organisms involved and their actions and the duration of the actions at certain timestamps in the film footage and on each still image. Before Dr. Allen and her co-authors submitted their manuscript for peer review and publication, they reached out to Hope Lappen, Biomedical and Life Sciences Librarian, and Andrew Creamer, Scientific Data Management Librarian, to get help with their questions about copyright and licenses for publishing and distributing their data, and for assistance with curating and depositing the files (the video, images, and analysis data underlying their paper’s findings) into an online collection in the Library’s Brown Digital Repository (BDR).

The BDR is the Library’s platform for making digital collections available online. The BDR has a collection called “Data for Publications,” which is an online gallery for Brown researchers to preserve the supplementary materials accompanying their published articles or the data underlying their results and conclusions. The BDR also allows researchers to cite these materials and data in their publications and to make these files available to other researchers and the public online.

Andrew worked with Ann Caldwell, the Library’s Metadata Librarian and Head of Digital Production Services, to plan out the descriptive information for each catalog record associated with their data set and the minimum documentation necessary to interpret the data. This process is iterative and involves collaborating with the authors to collect these details and create their records in the BDR with the aim of facilitating search, discovery, access, and citation of these materials online. Ann’s staff also helped to convert the film and image file formats into ones that are appropriate for long-term preservation.

Upon deposit of the files in the Library’s BDR, Andrew and Ann work with Joseph Rhoads, the BDR’s Manager, and Ben Cail, the BDR’s programmer, to display the files according to the wishes of the researchers. For the cuttlefish paper, the authors wanted to be able to not only preserve the original video and image files in the BDR, but also to stream the video so that readers could view the video from its record the BDR.  After files are uploaded, Joseph and Ben provide the researchers with a URL and a unique identifier, called a digital object identifier (DOI), that they can use to cite these materials within their article so that reviewers of their paper or interested readers can have access to them. By depositing the data in the BDR and citing the data within the paper, the authors allow readers to learn more about the science and judge the rigor and validity of their published findings. This transparency can help move science forward.

So what is the big deal about making these materials public? In short, the answer is impact. Scientists want to spread knowledge and know that their research can resonate with the public. By depositing their video with the Library and citing and sharing their video, Dr. Allen and her co-authors were able to reach more people than they would have through the publication of their article alone. How many more people? One week after publication of the article, their cuttlefish video had been viewed by over 140,000 people online! In addition, the video had been reported on the websites and social media feeds of the New York Times, National Geographic, and Science and reported on the websites and on the Facebook and Twitter and similar social media feeds of media outlets in several countries, including Germany’s Der Spiegel. These posts have been shared, liked, and retweeted by people fascinated with the dramatic events the research team captured on film.

Dr. Allen and her co-authors are not alone. A team of Brown undergraduates led by Dean Adetunji, Associate Dean of the College for Undergraduate Research and Inclusive Science, have deposited the file of a video in the Library’s BDR on the science of seeing color that has also has had over 100,000 views. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the National Science Foundation including broader and societal impact among the review criteria it uses to evaluate grant proposals submitted by researchers. The Library’s BDR plays a crucial role in helping to preserve and disseminate the digital outputs of Brown’s research community, including their broader impact materials that they have created for educating students or the public about their research. Videos, images, software, and documents that could easily be lost after the publication of an article now get cataloged by the Library and put online and discovered, accessed, and cited by other researchers and the public.

Scalar: Writing Digital Scholarship | Curtis Fletcher

The Library is pleased to host three events in the series, Scalar: Writing Digital Scholarship, this April, 2017. All events will be held in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library.

Curtis Fletcher, Associate Director of the Polymathic Labs at USC Libraries and Co-PI on Scalar

On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 12 p.m., Curtis Fletcher, Associate Director of the Polymathic Labs at USC Libraries and Co-PI on Scalar, will give a talk entitled, “Beyond the Platform: Enabling and Supporting New Forms of Digital Scholarship.” A reception will follow the talk. Free and open to the public.

Beyond the Platform: Enabling and Supporting New Forms of Digital Scholarship

Fletcher will discuss his experience working on Scalar, an open source authoring and publishing platform designed for media-rich, born-digital scholarship. Highlighting specific Scalar projects, broader use cases, and ongoing development, he will discuss the ways in which the platform’s affordances attempt to move digital scholarly publishing beyond the linear ePub; how emerging scholarly workflows and practices for creating media-rich, archive-connected, scholarship have evolved alongside those affordances; and how the platform’s design relates to broader trends in digital scholarship and the digital humanities.

Curtis Fletcher

Curtis Fletcher is the Associate Director of the Polymathic Labs at USC Libraries and Co-PI on Scalar. His research spans the history of technology, the history of humanities education, science and technology studies, and visual studies. He specializes in digital research and writing in the humanities with particular expertise in new models for authoring, credentialing, and publishing born-digital, multimodal, humanities scholarship. Prior to his work at USC Libraries he was Associate Multimedia Editor for Urban History at Cambridge University Press; Administrative Assistant for the Center for Transformative Scholarship in the Digital Age at USC; and Project Manager for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture.

These events are part of the Library’s series, The Future of Scholarly Publishing, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Date: Thursday, April 27, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Previous events in the series:

On Thursday, April 13, Caroline Frank, Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies at Brown, gave a talk entitled,”Paths Across the Pacific: A Scalar Project of East-West Interaction,” during which she discussed her recent Scalar project, “Asia-Pacific in the Making of the Americas.” Professor Frank presented with collaborator Andrea Ledesma, a graduate student in American Studies.

On Tuesday, April 18, Elli Mylonas, Senior Digital Humanities Librarian, hosted an “Introduction to Scalar” workshop.

Event | Abby Smith Rumsey: “Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?”

Abby Smith Rumsey

On Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, writer and historian Abby Smith Rumsey will discuss “Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?” A reception will follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

Digital Memory: What Can We Afford to Lose?

Memory technologies from papyrus to print have given humans a unique survival advantage, allowing us to accumulate knowledge. These technologies shape our perception of history, time, and personal and cultural identity. Historian Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory is shaping the future of knowledge and the roles that libraries and archives play in the future of our collective memory.

Abby Smith Rumsey

Abby Smith Rumsey is a writer and historian focusing on the creation, preservation, and use of the cultural record in all media. She has written and lectured widely on digital preservation, online scholarship, the nature of evidence, the changing roles of libraries and archives, intellectual property policies in the digital age, and the impact of new information technologies on perceptions of history and time.

Rumsey served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and has advised universities and their research libraries on strategies to integrate digital information resources into existing collections and services.

For over a decade, Rumsey worked with the Library of Congress’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in development of a national strategy to identify, collect, and preserve digital content of long-term value. She was on the National Science Foundation’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access and was senior writer and editor of the task force’s second-year report, Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet: Ensuring Long- term Access to Digital Information. The Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access. She served on the ACLS Commission on Cyberinfrastructure for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Rumsey served as director of programs at the Council on Library and Information Resources and was responsible for projects that addressed the use and preservation of historical and cultural materials in all genres, formats, and media. She wrote, edited, and commissioned numerous reports on the challenges of migrating our shared intellectual and cultural heritage from paper, film, and audio formats to digital media; and on consequences such organizational disruptions, threats of information loss, and changing conceptions about intellectual property and the value inherent in information.

Prior to that, she managed programs at the Library of Congress relating to preservation of and access to cultural heritage collections. She curated several exhibitions, including the “Treasures of the Library of Congress,” “Living Traditions of Russian Faith: Books and Manuscripts of the Old Believers,” and contributed to the historic display of documents from classified Soviet archives, “Revelations from the Russian Archives.” She worked with former Soviet bloc governments and organizations directing programs to open up access to their libraries and archives.

Abby Smith Rumsey holds a BA from Radcliffe College and MA and PhD degrees in history from Harvard University, where she specialized in Early Modern Russia and intellectual history. She has been a Fulbright Fellow and taught at Harvard and Johns Hopkins Universities.

This event is part of the Library’s ongoing lecture series, “The Future of Scholarly Publishing.” Abby Smith Rumsey’s visit to Brown is co-sponsored by the John Carter Brown Library.

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence, RI

Event | “Retooling the Monograph: The Manifold Scholarship Project” with Matthew Gold and Douglas Armato

On Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Matthew K. Gold and Douglas Armato will discuss “Retooling the Monograph: The Manifold Scholarship Project.” A reception will follow the talk. The event is free and open to the public.

Retooling the Monograph: The Manifold Scholarship Project

How can we integrate today’s sprawling landscape of scholarly communication, stretching as it does from print monographs to ebooks to online journals to digital humanities projects to social media posts? How can scholarly communication reflect the way scholars increasingly work: collaborating on projects, sharing texts as they evolve, and creating digital archives of related resources?  Focusing on such challenges, the Co-PI’s of the Mellon Foundation-funded Manifold Scholarship project will discuss the concept, development, and upcoming launch of their networked, iterative publishing platform, which seeks to “transform scholarly publications into living digital works.”

Related events on March 1:

Gold will also discuss “Digital Humanities Pedagogy” at the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning. His presentation will begin at 2 p.m. and will cover the philosophy and praxis of digital teaching in the humanities and related social sciences. Please see the Sheridan Center’s website to learn more or register to attend the talk.

Additionally, Armato will discuss “How to Pitch Your Book” with graduate students at
4 p.m. in the new Wernig Graduate Student Reading Room at the Rockefeller Library. The informal and informative conversation will take place in the seminar space (Room 219) and will cover when to approach a press, what you should have for the pitch, and what you should NEVER EVER do. Space is limited, so register for the conversation today.

Matthew K. Gold

Matthew K. Gold

Matthew K. Gold is Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he holds teaching appointments in the Ph.D. Program in English, the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies, and the doctoral certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. He serves as Advisor to the Provost for Digital Initiatives, Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, and Director of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab. He edited Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minnesota, 2012) and, with Lauren F. Klein (with whom he is co- editor of the Debates in the Digital Humanities book series), recently co-edited Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016.

His collaborative digital humanities projects include Manifold Scholarship, Commons In A Box, Looking for Whitman, DH Box, and Social Paper. He is Vice President/President-Elect of the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Douglas Armato

Douglas Armato

Douglas Armato is Director of the University of Minnesota Press, where he also acquires books in philosophy, social theory, and digital media and culture. In a thirty-six year career in scholarly publishing, he has also worked at Columbia University Press, Basic Books, Louisiana State University Press, the University of Georgia Press, and the Johns Hopkins University Press. He served two terms on the Board of Directors of the Association of American University Presses and was also that organization’s President in 2005-2006. He was also a member of the steering committees of University Press Content Consortium and the Books at JSTOR initiative. In 2005, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota, he formulated the Mellon Foundation-funded Quadrant Initiative for collaborative scholarly research and publication. He is currently co-PI (with Matthew K. Gold) on a Mellon Foundation Grant to develop Manifold Scholarship, an online platform for networked, iterative scholarship. He has spoken widely on issues of scholarly communication and is often quoted in local and national media stories on scholarly publishing.

Date: Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Time: 12 p.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library; Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Sciences Library; Wernig Graduate Student Reading Room, Second Floor, Rockefeller Library

Commencement Forum | Word/Image/Text: Reading for the Philosophers’ Stone in Atalanta fugiens with Tara Nummedal

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Tara Nummedal, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department

The Library welcomes visitors to a Commencement Forum on Saturday, May 28, 2016 at 11 a.m. in the Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab and Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio at the Rockefeller Library.

As part of Brown University’s new Digital Publishing Initiative, Professor Tara Nummedal will present on her upcoming publishing project. Project Atalanta will bring a multimedia seventeenth century text to life in digital form. This innovative digital publication will produce a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of Michael Maier’s extraordinary text, Atalanta fugiens (1617/18): an alchemical emblem book that re-casts the myth of Atalanta—the fleet-footed virgin—as a series of fifty emblems. Comprised of text, image, and music, each individual emblem engages sound, sight, and intellect; read together, these emblems serve as an interlocking guide to alchemical theory and the production of the philosophers’ stone.

As a pilot project of the Digital Publishing Initiative, Project Atalanta seeks to bridge the gaps between the readers of today and their seventeenth century counterparts. By transforming the Atalanta fugiens into a dynamic digital object through the collaboration of historians, musicians, rare book curators, linguists, scientists, artists, and other scholars Project Atalanta reflects a dynamic, emergent form of interdisciplinary scholarship. The University Library invites visitors to come and hear about this unique multimedia text, and explore along with Professor Nummedal the implications of reading across time, cultures, and technologies.

Tara Nummedal is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department. She is the author of Alchemy and Authority in the Holy Roman Empire and is currently completing her second book, “The Lion’s Blood: Alchemy, Gender, and Apocalypse in Reformation Germany.” Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and, most recently, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She is Past President of the New England Renaissance Conference and a member of the editorial board of the journal Ambix. She teaches courses in early modern European history and the history of science.

Date: Saturday, May 28, 2016
Time: 11 a.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Tara Nummedal and Donna Bilak: “Tear the Books Apart: Atalanta fugiens in a Digital Age”

Atalanta emblem XI

On Thursday, April 21, 2016, at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, scholars Tara Nummedal and Donna Bilak will speak about their digital publication, Project Atalanta. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Recently chosen as one of two pilot projects for Brown’s Mellon-funded digital publishing initiative, Nummedal and Bilak’s publication will bring a multimedia seventeenth century text to life in digital form. The digital publication will produce a dynamic, enhanced digital edition of Michael Maier’s extraordinary text, Atalanta fugiens (1617/18). An alchemical emblem book, Maier’s Atalanta fugiens re-casts the myth of Atalanta—the fleet-footed virgin—as a series of fifty emblems that outline the creation of the philosopher’s stone. With its combination of text, image, and music, the Atalanta fugiens represents an early multimedia work. In Project Atalanta, this historic text will be represented in dynamic digital form and be accompanied by newly written scholarship that will help elucidate the Atalanta fugiens’ many layers. 

In this lunchtime talk, Nummedal and Bilak will discuss their work-in-progress, share insight into the world of seventeenth century emblem culture, and help build a foundation for an open dialogue about the processes, opportunities, and challenges of producing digitally rich scholarly products. 

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Tara Nummedal

Tara Nummedal is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department. She is the author of Alchemy and Authority in the Holy Roman Empire and is currently completing her second book, “The Lion’s Blood: Alchemy, Gender, and Apocalypse in Reformation Germany.” Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and, most recently, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She is Past President of the New England Renaissance Conference and a member of the editorial board of the journal Ambix. She teaches courses in early modern European history and the history of science.

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Donna Bilak

Donna Bilak is a lecturer at Columbia University in New York. Her research interests encompass early modern European history of science and alchemy, early modern emblem culture, as well as 19th-century jewelry history and technology. Dr. Bilak’s doctoral research reconstructed the life and times of a 17th-century Puritan alchemist who operated in England and America, and she was the 2013-14 Edelstein Postdoctoral Fellow at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia where her research focused on analysis of the Atalanta fugiens(1618), an alchemical emblem book that encodes laboratory technologies using music and images. Dr. Bilak has lectured extensively on the topics of early modern alchemy as well as jewelry history throughout North America and Europe​.

Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Bill Rankin on “The Map, the Grid, and the Politics of Space, 1915 – 2015”

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On Friday, April 8, 2016 at noon in the Population Studies and Training Center in Mencoff Hall, Bill Rankin, Assistant Professor of the History of Science at Yale University, will give a talk, “The Map, the Grid, and the Politics of Space, 1915 – 2015.”

This event is part of the Spatial Humanities Lecture Series and is sponsored by Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4), the Brown University Library, and the M. B. Mandeville Lectureship Fund. It is free and open to the public.

In the last hundred years, the authority of the representational map has been challenged from multiple directions. On the level of everyday spatial management, the god’s-eye view of the map has been supplemented and displaced by new kinds of coordinate systems that stitch together the urban and the territorial. On the level of spatial imagination, the one-size-fits-all topographic map has been upstaged by new forms of argumentative and activist cartography. This talk addresses both of these turns–the first historically, during World War I and the decades afterward; the second through Rankin’s own urban mapping work.

picture-20-1443225396Bill Rankin‘s research focuses on the relationship between science and space, from the territorial scale of states and globalization down to the scale of individual buildings. He is particularly interested in mapping, the environmental sciences and technology, architecture and urbanism, and methodological problems of digital scholarship, spatial history, and geographic analysis (including GIS). His forthcoming book, After the Map: Cartography, Navigation, and the Transformation of Territory in the Twentieth Century, is a history of the mapping sciences in the twentieth century. His work in cartography can be found at www.radicalcartography.net.

Date: Friday, April 8, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Population Studies and Training Center, Mencoff Hall, 68 Waterman Street, Providence

Event | Tom Elliott on “The Pleiades Gazetteer Data Model: Going Off-Road in the Spatial and Digital Humanities

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On Friday, March 25, 2016 at noon in the Digital Scholarship Lab at the Rockefeller Library, Tom Elliott, Associate Director for Digital Programs and Senior Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University, will discuss the Pleiades Gazetteer of the Ancient World, a community-built gazetteer and graph of ancient places.

Tom will unpack the Pleiades data model and the content curation process that supports it, highlighting the major decision points and criteria in its development history. A key theme of the talk will be conceptual flexibility and reinvention in a digital humanities project.

This event is part of the Spatial Humanities Lecture Series and is sponsored by Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences (S4), the Brown University Library, and the M. B. Mandeville Lectureship Fund. It is free and open to the public.

Pleiades publishes authoritative information about ancient places and spaces, providing unique services for finding, displaying, and reusing that information under open license. It publishes not just for individual human users, but also for search engines and for the widening array of computational research and visualization tools that support humanities teaching and research. It embraces the new paradigm of citizen humanities, encouraging contributions from any knowledgeable person and doing so in a context of pervasive peer review.

The project arose out of work on the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. It now provides open access to the most comprehensive geospatial dataset for antiquity available today; it serves as a key component of at least 40 other important digital humanities projects; and it constitutes a core resource for classroom activities focused on ancient geography.

Since its inception, Pleiades has been repeatedly been re-conceptualized in response to technical challenges and opportunities. The resulting digital publication can be hard to characterize by genre or function. Is it historical? Is it archaeological? Is it a GIS or a digital gazetteer? Is it an “Un-GIS”? A reference work? A controlled vocabulary? A Linked Data graph?

Tom Elliott

miniTom Elliott graduated from Duke University in 1989 with B.S. in Computer Science and a second major in Classical Studies. Following service as a Communications and Computer Systems Officer in the United States Air Force, he worked as a software developer and program manager for AEgis Research Corporation (now AEgis Technologies) on a number of visual and engineering simulation projects. He received his Ph.D. in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 2004, for research focused on the intersection of Roman documentary, administrative and geographic studies. His doctoral dissertation was entitled: Epigraphic Evidence for Boundary Disputes in the Early Roman Empire.

Tom has spent nearly two decades advancing the practice of digital humanities in ancient studies. In the late 1990s, he wrote database software that was used to prepare the alphabetical gazetteer and Map-by-Map Directory that accompanies the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World (Princeton, 2000). During that period he also started the EpiDoc Community, which creates standards-based tools and guidelines for the digital encoding of epigraphic and papyrological texts like those published in the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias 2007or by the Integrating Digital Papyrology project. In August 2000, he was appointed as Founding Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In February 2006, Tom stepped down from this position to assume full-time leadership of the Pleiades Project, which is developing an online workspace for ancient geography. In 2008, he brought this role with him to the Institute, where he is also responsible for developing and overseeing a spectrum of innovative digital projects and services.

Date: March 25, 2016
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | Candace Thille on “The Science of Learning, Technology, and the Role of Elite Universities in the Transformation of Higher Education”

cthilleOn Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 4 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab, Candace Thille, founding director of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University and at Stanford University, will give a talk, “The Science of Learning, Technology, and the Role of Elite Universities in the Transformation of Higher Education.” This event is free and open to the public.

Using intelligent tutoring systems, virtual laboratories, simulations, social psychological interventions, and frequent opportunities for assessment and feedback, The Open Learning Initiative (OLI), first at Carnegie Mellon University and now at Stanford University, has been creating and evaluating open web-based learning environments for over fourteen years. The OLI environments also serve as a laboratory for fundamental research on human learning. In her talk, Dr. Thille will discuss how the OLI makes use of expertise from the science of learning to produce high-quality learning environments and how studies of student use inform both the next iteration of the environment and advance underlying learning theory. She hopes for a lively discussion about the role of places such as Brown and Stanford – elite independent research universities that have a strong commitment to exceptional undergraduate instruction – in the transformation of higher education.

Candace Thille is the founding director of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University and at Stanford University. She is a senior research fellow in the Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her focus is in applying the results from research in the science of learning to the design and evaluation of open web-based learning environments and in using those environments to conduct research in human learning. Dr. Thille serves on the board of directors of the Association of American Colleges and Universities; as a fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education; on the Assessment 2020 Task Force of the American Board of Internal Medicine; on the advisory council for the Association of American Universities STEM initiative; on the advisory council for the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources. She served on the working group of the President¹s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) for the Obama Administration that produced the Engage to Excel report and on the U.S. Department of Education working group, co-authoring the 2010 and 2015 National Education Technology Plans.

Date: March 23, 2016
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation

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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. in Pembroke Hall, three academic publishing professionals will participate in a panel discussion entitled, “New Directions in Scholarly Publishing and the Challenges of Evaluation.” This lecture series is intended to engage Brown faculty and students in a conversation about changes in the field of scholarly communication in the twenty-first century and will complement the University’s initiative for digital scholarship, which was recently awarded a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

The panelists:

  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communications and managing editor of PMLA
  • Alison Mudditt, Director of the University of California Press
  • Tara McPherson, Founding Editor of Vectors, and creator of the new authoring platform, Scalar

The discussion will focus on the history and evolution of scholarly publishing, innovative publishing platforms, and how university presses can adapt to meet the needs of multimodal scholarship while continuing to provide the rigorous review processes that meet the needs of the scholarly community.

This lecture series is co-sponsored by the Brown University Library and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

Abstracts

Kathleen Fitzpatrick:
Focus will be on the MLA’s platforms for supporting new forms of scholarly communication, including the Commons and CORE, as well as MLA’s guidelines for evaluating digital scholarship for tenure and promotion.

Alison Mudditt:
Scholarly communication is increasingly in flux as the academic community, scholarly organizations and research funders question whether traditional publishing models and norms are still appropriate in an increasingly open and digital age. As a vitally important and distinctive vehicle for communication in the humanities, how can monographs not only be preserved but also reinvigorated as we move towards open, digital models? Open access has enormous potential to increase the reach and impact of scholarship, but it will have disruptive effects on established norms, and raises some key questions – especially in disciplines deeply invested in the slow forms of knowledge-making represented by the monograph. Speaker will address the barriers, sensitivities and practical challenges surrounding open access monographs, and about the ways in which UC Press is addressing them via its innovative Luminos program (www.luminosoa.org).

Tara McPherson:
What are the particular affordances of the digital for scholarly knowledge production today? How might we imagine scholarship differently if we move beyond a focus on text toward multimodal expression and design? What audiences might such work reach? This talk will explore how we might envision scholarship along multiple scales and in varied formats, paying particular attention to the ways in which scholarly evidence might be engaged anew through the possibilities of the digital archive. By taking up the specific case of the online platform Scalar, the speaker will approach these questions through concrete examples of digital scholarship today.

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Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association, where she serves as Managing Editor of PMLA and other MLA publications. She also holds an appointment as Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing.

Alison Mudditt

Alison Mudditt

Alison Mudditt has been Director of University of California Press since 2011, where she has focused on reshaping the Press’s strategy and structure to meet the needs of its diverse audiences in the digital age. Alison has twenty-five years experience in scholarly publishing which began at Blackwell in Oxford, UK, where she rose to become Publisher for the Humanities Division. In 1997, Alison moved to Taylor & Francis Inc. in Philadelphia as Publishing Director of the Behavioral Sciences Division. Alison joined SAGE in 2001 as Vice President and Editorial Director, and was appointed Executive Vice President in 2004 where she led the SAGE’s publishing programs across books, journals and digital during a period of tremendous growth. Alison is a regular speaker at industry meetings and is currently Vice Chair of the Scientific Publications Committee and member of the Open Science Committee of the American Heart Association, and member of the Board of Directors of K|N Consultants. She has also served on the Executive Council of the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the American Association of Publishers, and was Co-Chair of the Dean’s Leadership Council at California State University, Channel Islands.

TaraMcPherson

Tara McPherson

Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts and Director of the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Studies. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research engages the cultural dimensions of media, including the intersection of gender, race, affect and place. She has a particular interest in digital media. Here, her research focuses on the digital humanities, early software histories, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.

She is author of the award-winning Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Duke UP: 2003), co-editor of Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Duke UP: 2003) and of Transmedia Frictions: The Digital, The Arts + the Humanities (California, 2014), and editor of Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected, part of the MacArthur Foundation series on Digital Media and Learning (MIT Press, 2008.) She is currently completing a monograph about her lab’s work and process, Designing for Difference, for Harvard University Press. She is the Founding Editor of Vectors, www.vectorsjournal.org, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press, and is a founding editor of the MacArthur-supported International Journal of Learning and Media (launched by MIT Press in 2009.) She is the lead PI on the new authoring platform, Scalar, and for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, http://scalar.usc.edu/. Her research has been funded by the Mellon, Ford, Annenberg, and MacArthur Foundations, as well as by the NEH.

Date: March 21, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: The Cogut Center for the Humanities, Pembroke Hall, 172 Meeting Street, Providence