Exhibit | Haggadah: Telling and Retelling the Story of Jewish Liberation 

Selections from the Dr. Steven Ungerleider Collection of Haggadot

The Dr. Steven Ungerleider Collection of Haggadot, presenting the text recited on the first two nights of the Jewish Passover, represents a remarkable array of geographic, linguistic, and temporal diversity. Encompassing more than four hundred years of Jewish culture, from the Ottoman Empire in 1505 to the State of Israel in the 1950s, the collection is comprised of haggadot from Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and the Near East. It incorporates a wide range of Jewish vernacular languages, from Yiddish and Ladino to Judeo-Italian and Judeo-Arabic in representative exemplars from Jewish communities across the globe, many long since dispersed.

The current exhibition, Haggadah: Telling and Retelling the Story of Jewish Liberation, highlights the breadth and depth of the Ungerleider Collection. This extraordinary gift to the University honors Dr. Steven Ungerleider’s father, Samuel Ungerleider, Jr. ‘39.

The exhibition will be on display in the lobby and main gallery of the John Hay Library from Monday, March 5, through Friday, June 15, 2018.

Dates: March 5 – June 15, 2018
Time: John Hay Library Hours
Location: Exhibition Gallery, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Familiar Wild Flowers

Common Scarlet Poppy or Red-Weed, 1895.

Familiar Wild Flowers (1897)                                                                                              F. Edward Hulme

Frederick Edward Hulme (1841–1909) was born in Hanley, Staffordshire, the son of an accomplished artist. He was a professor of drawing at King’s College London and a prolific writer on natural history, archeology, art instruction, flags of the world and other subjects. Familiar Wild Flowers was Hulme’s third publication and his most popular. Each volume contains 40 color plates and detailed descriptions with historical references for each flower. Eight of the nine volumes were published during his lifetime.

The author reveals the pleasure he took in his work in the preface to the first volume:

“The plants we have represented will be to many as old familiar friends, linked in their minds with sunny memories; and nothing that we can say or leave unsaid will either enhance or detract from their enjoyment. To those, however, who have yet to find in a new study this wealth of interest, we would venture to commend our pleasant labours, in the earnest hope that through them they may be led to enter for themselves on this enjoyable pursuit, and find, like ourselves, in the study of Nature an ever-increasing delight.”

Dates: March 5 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | #LibraryLove on Valentine’s Day

This Valentine’s Day–Wednesday, February 14–let us know what you love about the Library, enjoy some cookies, and write a love letter.

There will be cookies and a taped up heart in four library locations, along with sticky notes and pens. We invite you to write what you love about the Library on a sticky note and put it up on the wall with the heart. We’ll take some pictures and post them on Instagram @brownuniversitylibrary and Twitter @brownlibrary with #LibraryLove. We’d love to see your posts, too!

Each location will also have available complimentary greeting cards from the Friends of the Library collection. Please help yourself to a card, write a love letter, seal and address the envelope (you will need to know the address), and place it in the box near the cards. The Library will mail it for you!

Not on campus? Create a virtual heart-shaped love note here by clicking here!

The Library loves our Brown students and faculty, and we want to know what we’re doing that you love so we can keep it up. Thanks for taking part in #LibraryLove and Happy Valentine’s Day!

Date: Wednesday, February 14, 2018
Time: All day
Locations:

  • Rockefeller Library, Sorensen Family Reading Room
  • John Hay Library, First Floor Lounge
  • Sciences Library, Lobby
  • Orwig Music Library, Circulation Area

Exhibit | Greek Life – A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa at Brown

Greek Life – A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa at Brown
Selected Items On View From the Brown University Archives

For over 200 years Phi Beta Kappa has celebrated academic achievement and advocated for freedom of thought.  It is the oldest and most prestigious academic honors society in the United States.

The Rhode Island Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was founded at Brown University in 1830. Brown students elected to Phi Beta Kappa join a tradition that exemplifies the Phi Beta Kappa motto “Love of learning is the guide of life,” symbolized in the gold key.  Membership is diverse, connecting U.S. Presidents, Supreme Court Justices, Nobel Laureates, authors, diplomats, athletes, researchers, actors, and business leaders.

Dates: February 6 – March 30, 2018
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Lincoln Recordó en America Latina

LINCOLN RECORDÓ EN AMERICA LATINA

Selected Items on View at the John Hay Library:

“Canción a Abraham Lincoln” Lady’s Fan, c. 1865
Havana, Cuba
Brown University Library, Special Collections

Latin Americans observed, mourned and commemorated Abraham Lincoln’s life and legacy in a number of ways. Argentinians named a city in Buenos Aires Province for him. Statues of Lincoln can be found in Mexico, Cuba and Ecuador. Avenida Abraham Lincoln is a main thoroughfare in the city of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Shown here is a more personal object: a lady’s fan, thought to have been produced in Havana. It commemorates Lincoln’s life and assassination in both English and Spanish.

Vida de Abran Lincoln, décimo sesto presidente de los Estados Unidos
Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (1811–1888)
Nueva York, Estados Unidos: D. Appleton y Ca., 1866
Brown University Library, Special Collections

In May 1865, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento arrived in New York to take up his post as minister plenipotentiary to the United States from the newly reunified Argentine Republic. Arriving from a country in triumph to a country in deep mourning, Sarmiento heard a great deal and thought deeply about Lincoln, whose ideas about government he found engaging and with whom he felt he would have had much in common. Before the year was out, he had written a full length biography of the assassinated leader, whom he had never met, publishing it in his native Spanish in New York. “In the life of Lincoln,” Sarmiento wrote, “we find commonalities of existence in both Americas, and in the facts relating thereto must deduce lessons and useful warnings for our own government.”  The copy shown here was originally presented by Sarmiento, hot off the press, to the Library of Congress.

Dates: February 6 – 28, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Annual Address of the Carriers & Newsmen of the N.Y. Herald, 1851

 

Annual Address of the Carriers & Newsmen of the New York Herald:  On the Opening of the Year 1851

Carriers’ Addresses were published by newspapers and local newsboys delivered these greetings in verse each New Year’s Day to customers who understood that a tip was expected.  Lasting for more than two centuries in the United States, the custom originated in England and was introduced during colonial times.

The poems, often anonymous, describe the events of the past year, locally, regionally, and nationally, and end with a request for a gratuity for the faithful carrier. Often the poem referred to the carrier’s diligence and hardships during winter weather. Illustrated with wood-engravings and decorative borders, carriers’ addresses are distinctive examples of popular publishing in nineteenth century America.

Dates: January 5 – 31, 2018
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Works from Modern Architecture

Works from Modern Architecture: A Course with Dietrich Neumann 
On view, architectural models created by students in Professor Dietrich Neumann’s lecture course, “Modern Architecture,” which surveys the “classic” period of European and American modern architecture from the turn of the century to the 1950s.  Works are based on a building or industrial design object from the time period.
                                                                                                                                            Dates: December 20, 2017 – April 6, 2018
TimeJohn D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library Hours
Location: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Event | The Choreography of Things with Sydney Skybetter

On Thursday, December 7, 2017 at 12 p.m. in the Digital Scholarship Lab of the Rockefeller Library, Sydney Skybetter, Lecturer of Dance and Fellow of Public Humanities at Brown, will give a talk entitled, “The Choreography of Things.” This event is free and open to the public. A light reception will follow.

Skybetter will discuss his research into ways that movement generates meaning, for people and for machines. By tracing the commingling histories of dance notation and affective computing, exploring a gamut of emerging technologies (including drone swarms, artificial intelligence, self-driving cars and robots) and ranting about the premonitionary qualities of the movie Minority Report, Skybetter will argue for the importance of choreographic method and metaphor for our emerging technological future. 

Sydney Skybetter is a choreographer. Hailed by Dance Magazine as “One of the most influential people in dance today,” his work has been performed around the country at such venues as The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Boston Center for the Arts, Jacob’s Pillow and The Joyce Theater. He has consulted on issues of cultural change and technology for The National Ballet of Canada, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Hasbro, New York University and The University of Southern California, among others. A sought-after speaker, he lectures on everything from dance history to cultural futurism, most recently at Harvard University, South by Southwest Interactive, TEDx, Saatchi and Saatchi, Dance/USA, NYU and MVR5. He is a Public Humanities Fellow and Lecturer at Brown University, where he researches the problematics of human computer interfaces and mixed reality systems. He is the founder of the Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces (CRCI), which convenes ethnographers, anthropologists, speculative designers and performing artists to discuss the choreography of the Internet of Things. He produces shows at Joe’s Pub, SteelStacks and OBERON with DanceNOW[NYC], has served as a Grant Panelist for the National Endowment of the Arts, is a Curatorial Advisor for Fractured Atlas’ Exponential Creativity Fund, and is the winner of a RISCA Fellowship in Choreography from the State of Rhode Island. He received his MFA in Choreography from New York University.

www.skybetter.org

Date: Thursday, December 7, 2017
Time: 12 p.m.
Location: Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab, Rockefeller Library, 10 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | San Francisco General Hospital Pillowcase

From the Scott O’Hara Papers: SFGH Pillowcase

Scott O’Hara (1961–1998) was a sex radical, porn star, writer and publisher. Between 1983 and 1993, he performed in over twenty gay and bisexual adult films.  He also edited and published the quarterly sex-positive journal Steam and the short-lived cultural magazine Wilde.

O’Hara was hospitalized at San Francisco General Hospital with AIDS-related lymphoma in February 1998. He chose to leave the hospital on the afternoon of February 18, and he died at home that evening. He was thirty-six years old.

San Francisco General Hospital was at the forefront of the AIDS crisis. In January 1983, the hospital opened the first outpatient AIDS clinic, followed later that year by the first dedicated AIDS ward in the United States. The hospital became known for the “San Francisco model” of care, an approach to treatment that emphasized compassion and respect, centralized health and social services, and collaboration with community partners.

The pillowcase will be on view in recognition of World AIDS Day.

Dates: December 1 – 21, 2017
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence

Exhibit | Dancy Box by Caitlín R. Kiernan & Kathryn A. Pollnac

The Brown University Library recently acquired the papers of award-winning science fiction and dark fantasy writer Caitlin R. Kiernan.

“In April 2011, I wrote a story featuring my recurring character Dancy Flammarion. The story was titled “Bus Fair,” and it concerns Dancy having to play a riddle game with a werewolf to get back a cigar box containing her most precious possessions. The story became the basis for the first issue of Alabaster, the graphic novel series I scripted for Dark Horse Comics between 2011 and 2015.

In October and November of 2010, after I’d gotten the idea for “Bus Fair,” Kathryn and I created Dancy’s cigar box, because sometimes we do things like that. To pay bills, we auctioned it on eBay, where it brought a very respectable $785 from a longtime fan from Virginia. In July 2017, the fan offered to return the box to me, so that it could be kept with my papers at the John Hay Library. The New Testament in the box was donated by another fan (it had been her mother’s), and the cigar box itself was given to us by Kathryn’s cousin.”  —Caitlín R. Kiernan

The Dancy Box is currently on view.

Dates: November 3 – November 30, 2017
TimeJohn Hay Library Hours
Location: Second Floor Landing, John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street, Providence