Episode 05: Kate Duffy on Phantom Archives

Portrait of Nancy Luce. Photograph by Joseph W. Warren.
Portrait of Nancy Luce. Photograph by Joseph W. Warren. Original copy found in the Boston Public Library’s Collections.

How are artists and performers finding creative uses for archival materials? On our latest episode we’re joined by Kate Duffy, a doctoral candidate in American Studies at Brown who is also one of the creators of The Phantom Archive. Kate describes her interest in creating dreamlike spaces around archival materials, explains what she’s learned from nineteenth-century forms of entertainment like panoramas and magic shows, and introduces us to Mr. Crowley and Nancy Luce.

This episode is part of our series on the creators behind Gallery Lab, an exciting collection of pop-up exhibitions, performances, and other programming hosted by the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage (Brown University).

Kate Duffy is a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies at Brown University. Her focus is nineteenth-century American culture and the history of science. Right now she is working on a dissertation about phrenology. She also works in the world of museums and historic sites, most recently serving as a curatorial research fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. More information is on her web site at www.kateduffy.net.

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Episode 05: Kate Duffy on Phantom Archives by Public Work: a public humanities podcast

How are artists and performers finding creative uses for archival materials? On our latest episode we’re joined by Kate Duffy, a doctoral candidate in American Studies at Brown who is also one of the creators of The Phantom Archive.

Show Notes

The music on this episode is excerpted from the song “New Day” by Lee Rosevere (licensed via Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International).

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